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AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO
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GMO-Free Europe

GMO-Free Europe | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon, FCHSAPGEO
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Alison D. Gilbert's curator insight, February 5, 11:47 AM

Parts of Europe know to be GMO free. When will we?

Jason Wilhelm's curator insight, February 27, 8:25 AM

The GMO debate is raging throughout the world. Many believe that these crops have many harmful effects on the human body due their their altered genetic state. Thankfully, many countries are adopting a non-GMO attitude, as illustrated in the above map, so as to prevent the many poor side-effects they have.

Whitney Souery's curator insight, May 28, 3:44 PM

This map is the epitome of agricultural geography and the beginning of a series of questions such as why did all of Europe choose to be GMO-free? Or, does the proximity of European countries have to do with the fact that they share similar values (such as being GMO-free)? What does the EU have to do with this pattern? Because the EU chooses to be GMO-free, European countries are making a statement and consequently refining agricultural markets by refusing to import certain genetically modified foods. Agricultural geography thus shares some patterns across space- with all of Europe sharing simile agricultural policies. 

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How The Russians Saved America's Sunflower

It's one of the few food crops that actually originated in North America. But the sunflower was just a pretty diversion until Soviet breeders came up with oil-rich varieties that became a staple.

 

This podcast discusses the foods that are native to the U.S., diffusion of species and the advantages of sunflower oil in the making of potato chips.  All of these become salient points for enhancing spatial thinking, understanding geographic patterns and processes.  


Via Mr. David Burton, Seth Dixon
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Changes in Mortality: 1900 vs 2010

Changes in Mortality: 1900 vs 2010 | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
How we die (in one chart)...

 

This infographic shows the main causes of death in 1900 in the United States and compares that with the 2010 figures.  The United States, during that time underwent what many call the epidemiological transition (in essence, in developed societies we now die for different reason and generally live longer) What are the geographic factors that influence these shifts in the mortality rates?  What is better about society?  Has anything worsened?  How come?  


Via Seth Dixon
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Kim Vignale's comment, July 9, 2012 7:33 PM
In the 1900s, there were more "natural" caused illnesses but not enough medicine or technology to alleviate these diseases, hence, the greater mortality rate. Presently, medicine and technology has changed for the greater good. Many of the diseases are cured and more people living longer due to this. However, mortality caused by heart disease and cancer have increased in 2010; this is probably due to higher calorie diets and exposure to preservatives and radiation.
Don Brown Jr's comment, July 10, 2012 4:17 PM
Looking back and comparing the 1900’s to 2010, I think it is becoming quite evident that our surrounding environment and what we consume impacts our health. Honestly what kind of cancer are you not at risk of getting today? Factors can vary from the genetically altered food we consume, radiation emitted from our cell phones or even prolonged exposure to the sun. While combating harmful pathogens and bacteria may have been a critical health concern and challenge of the early 20th century, finding remedies to an increasingly toxic environment may characterize the medical needs of the 21st century.
Justin McCullough's curator insight, December 12, 2013 9:50 AM

The thing that is positive about this infograph on how we die, is that our mortality rate has indeed gone down a whole lot since 1900. As the article states, we have become more aware of the bacteria taht surrounds us and have learned to be more clean because of it. This has surely cut down the rate in which people die by infectious diseases. However, it is interesting to see that heart diseases remains in one of the top ways that we die, even to this day. Accident deaths have also significantly dropped, probably due to the safety measures taken in the workplaces, or the technological advances that have made fighting wars, less deadly than during the 1900s. 

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NYTimes Video: Cultivating Dinner

NYTimes Video: Cultivating Dinner | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Americans ate 475 million pounds of tilapia last year, making this once obscure African native the most popular farmed fish in the United States.

 

Industrial farming, human-introduced species, GMOs, outsourcing and environmental impacts are but some of the relevant themes from this video.  How are global taste buds reshaping the geographic landscape? 


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 25, 2013 6:04 AM

Industrial farming, human-introduced species, GMOs, outsourcing and environmental impacts are but some of the relevant themes from this video.  How are global taste buds reshaping the geographic landscape?


Tags: GMOsindustry, food, agriculture, agribusiness,

 

Cynthia Williams's curator insight, July 25, 2013 9:44 AM

My concern is how safe is bioengineered food?  How has its nutritional content been altered?  Until some of our questions about bioengineered food can be answered by the FDA and other government officials I remain leery about the potential side effects that might occur from eating it and wonder how nutritious it really is.

megan b clement's curator insight, December 15, 2013 10:59 PM
The video discusses how now alot of countries are industrially farm raising their fish. Tilapia is a perfect example Americans ate 475 million pounds of Tilapia last year. Ten years ago you would never even hear about Tilapia because it was not a popular fish. Times have changed how they raise them and then ship them out the video shows one of the farms where they grow the TIlapia.