AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO
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Language: The cornerstone of national identity

Language: The cornerstone of national identity | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"Of the national identity attributes included in the Pew Research Center survey, language far and away is seen as the most critical to national identity. Majorities in each of the 14 countries polled say it is very important to speak the native language to be considered a true member of the nation."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 2, 3:22 PM

Most Europeans see language as a strong prerequisite to be a part of the "national identity."  Immigration has put a strain on cultural identities that are often very political. A majority of European agree on the link between language and national identity, but not surprisingly, the older Europeans and those on the political right feel more strongly about the importance of speaking the national language to truly 'belong.'

 

Tags: language, culturepolitical, Europe, migration, ethnicity.

Colby Selph 's curator insight, March 10, 10:15 AM
Language is someones culture and everyone should be able to carry their culture to new places like luggage and try to implement their culture in new places.
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Germany reunified 26 years ago, but some divisions are still strong

Germany reunified 26 years ago, but some divisions are still strong | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"While 75 percent of Germans who live in the east said that they considered their country's reunification a success, only half of western Germans agreed. With eastern and western Germans blaming each other for past mistakes over the past two years, that frustration has likely increased. Younger citizens, especially — who do not usually identify themselves with their area of origin as strongly anymore — have grown worried about the persistent skepticism on both sides. But where do those divisions come from? And how different are eastern and western Germany today?"


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 4, 2016 5:04 PM

This series of 10 maps (and 1 satellite image) highlights many of the cultural and economic divisions between East and West, despite efforts to in the last 26 years to smooth out these discrepancies. The social geographies imposed by the Iron Curtain and the Berlin Wall are still being felt from this relic border and will for years to come. 

 

Tags: Germany, industry, laboreconomichistorical, politicalborders.

Jeremy Hansen's curator insight, November 1, 2016 11:25 AM
Seth Dixon's insight: This series of 10 maps (and 1 satellite image) highlights many of the cultural and economic divisions between East and West, despite efforts to in the last 26 years to smooth out these discrepancies. The social geographies imposed by the Iron Curtain and the Berlin Wall are still being felt from this relic border and will for years to come.
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Thousands Leave Norwegian Church as Online Registration Backfires

Thousands Leave Norwegian Church as Online Registration Backfires | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"15,035 people have 'unsubscribed' from the church since Monday."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 22, 2016 1:40 PM

Europe, the most developed region in the world, is also the most secular region today.  During colonial times, Europeans were spreading Christianity across the globe, but now Christianity is becoming more a part of Europe's historical landscape.  Secularization can be seen as either the cause or the effect of several other European trends such as declining fertility rates.  Today Europeans have stopped attending mass en masse, and many cathedrals sit empty.  This example for Norway has an amusing twist, but it is rooted in a powerful cultural shift. 

 

Questions to Ponder: What are other signs of secularization on the cultural landscape?  What would you do with a former sacred site (and an architectural treasure) that is can't be maintained?

 

Tags: culturepopular culture, religion, ChristianityNorway, Europe.

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The Vatican’s Gallery of Maps Comes Back to Life

The Vatican’s Gallery of Maps Comes Back to Life | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
In the 16th century, Pope Gregory assigned the monk and geographer Ignazio Danti to carry out the project. In turn, Danti hired several artistic stars of the day and up-and-comers as well to illustrate the maps, including Girolamo Muziano, Cesare Nebbia and the Flemish brothers Matthijs and Paul Bril. The Brils excelled at landscape paintings—an essential skill for the work.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 3, 2016 12:01 PM

This 4-year restoration project is a great cultural revival, but it also reveals the importance of geographic information.  The Vatican was a great medieval seat of both religious authority and political power.  This attracted prominent visitors from all over Europe and the map gallery served to convey geographic information about the Italian peninsula.  

 

Tagsart, Italy, historical, Europe, religiontourism, Christianity.

Loreto Vargas's curator insight, August 6, 2016 6:30 PM
Wonderful and amazing
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Brexit: Reaction and the Aftermath

Brexit: Reaction and the Aftermath | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"The reactions to the Brexit have come in from all corners.  Since this was so shocking, newspapers articles that are insightful are using hyperbole in their titles to get our attention (Britain just killed globalization as we know it–Washington Post; Will Brexit mark the end of the age of globalization?–LA Times).  There have also been some excellent political cartoons and memes, so I wanted to archive a few of them here."  

 

Tags: Europe, supranationalism, globalization, economic, political, images.


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MsPerry's curator insight, June 29, 2016 11:29 AM
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UN News - ‘Unprecedented’ 65 million people displaced by war and persecution in 2015 – UN

UN News - ‘Unprecedented’ 65 million people displaced by war and persecution in 2015 – UN | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
The number of people displaced from their homes due to conflict and persecution last year exceeded 60 million for the first time in United Nations history, a tally greater than the population of the United Kingdom, or of Canada, Australia and New Zealand combined, says a new report released on World Refugee Day today.

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Dustin Fowler's curator insight, June 20, 2016 5:32 PM
We have more displaced people today than we did after World War II (well, we do have about twice as many people on earth).  This is huge news, and there seems to be no real end to the problem, only the looming uncertainty as to how the world will handle and respond to the growing numbers of those without homes.  Out of every 113 people on earth, one of them is a refugee.  The issue of how to handle migration issues today is the very heart of the difference between how liberals and conservatives feel is the best way to make the world a better place.  
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FORMER CATALAN MP: Here's why Catalonia should secede from Spain, and why it won't

FORMER CATALAN MP: Here's why Catalonia should secede from Spain, and why it won't | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"What a non-independent people fear most is the possibility of being swallowed up by the dominant alien culture in their midst, and that's the likely outcome for Catalans under the Spanish rule. Don’t be surprised if they increasingly opt out of Spain and choose outright independence instead...there will never ever be a self-defeating Spanish government willing to risk losing Catalonia: 16% of its population, 19% of its G.D.P., 24% of its exports, a net provider of 20 billion euros ($22.3 billion) in siphoned taxes every year."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 16, 2016 11:03 AM

This op-ed piece is overtly pro-Catalonian independence so there is no attempt to be fair and balanced, but that bias is a strength because it so clearly frames the political and cultural issues from a Catalonian Nationalist perspective. This article is a great way to show students how some members of a particular group that is seeking greater autonomy or independence perceives the relationship between their region and the larger state.


Questions to Ponder: How might a representative of the Spanish government frame the debate differently? What are key reasons that the author does not envision full Catalonian independence soon? How would you frame the issues? What other example do you think is analogous to this political situation?

Tags: op-ed, Catalonia, Spain, political, devolution, autonomyEurope, culture.

Bridgitte's curator insight, March 2, 2016 9:24 AM

This op-ed piece is overtly pro-Catalonian independence so there is no attempt to be fair and balanced, but that bias is a strength because it so clearly frames the political and cultural issues from a Catalonian Nationalist perspective. This article is a great way to show students how some members of a particular group that is seeking greater autonomy or independence perceives the relationship between their region and the larger state.


Questions to Ponder: How might a representative of the Spanish government frame the debate differently? What are key reasons that the author does not envision full Catalonian independence soon? How would you frame the issues? What other example do you think is analogous to this political situation?

Tags: op-ed, Catalonia, Spain, political, devolution, autonomy, Europe, culture.

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The Origin of Krampus, Europe's Evil Twist on Santa

The Origin of Krampus, Europe's Evil Twist on Santa | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
The mythical holiday beast is once again on the prowl, but beware, he's making his way across the Atlantic

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 4, 2015 4:12 PM

Questions to Ponder: So what kind of cultural diffusion is this?  Expansion diffusion, contagious diffusion, stimulus diffusion or hierarchical diffusion?  Why so?

 

Is this more as a pop culture phenomenon or a revitalization of a folk cultural tradition?  How come?

 

Tags: religion, Europeculture, historical.

Kevin Nguyen's curator insight, December 7, 2015 11:35 AM

Very interesting opposite of Saint Nick that came from a lore displaying Satan figure. I've never heard of this Krampus character but from the origins of it, the character makes it feel very mysterious and give a little spookiness to the holidays. In addition, it gives refugees the chance to explore European culture as a way to adapt to different culture. 

Sarah Cannon's curator insight, December 16, 2015 4:29 PM

With new movies always coming out, its nice to hear films that are based on true stories or myths come to the theaters. Krampus is a movie that came out recently and is based on a myth that originated in Austria. This is scary tail of a beastly creature coming out Christmas and deals with the bad kids. Krampus is known to beat bad kids with birch branches or to be taken to his lair to be eaten or tortured. An interesting myth, people always look at Christmas as a good time with family.

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Is it time to scrap "Eastern Europe"?

"Europe’s divisions are indeed grave. But counting the ex-communist countries as a single category is outdated and damaging "


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Vermont Social Studies's curator insight, October 6, 2015 8:47 AM

Danube Europe? Roma Europe? Scared of Russia Europe? Solvent Europe? Could be a great learning exercise to have your students decide and justify the best new term.

Matthew Richmond's curator insight, November 4, 2015 7:15 PM

I don't know what else you'd want to call the region. Western Asia? Western Russia? I understand that the culture isn't particularly what one would think of when they think "Europe". Regions are like nicknames, you don't get to pick your own (unless you're Howard Stern).

Kevin Nguyen's curator insight, December 7, 2015 11:53 AM

It's true the term Eastern Europe is very outdated because borders are constantly changing. Also different ethnic groups and geographic differences that make up the region divide the west and east. However, some countries such as Greece wants to be more Europe and the countries surrounding it are not really "western". So by labeling countries by fixed region is not very accurate in terms of where they are located on the map.

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The threat to France’s Jews

The threat to France’s Jews | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Official figures indicate that over the last two decades the number of antisemitic acts has tripled. Between January and July 2014 official figures show that there were 527 violent antisemitic acts in France as opposed to 276 for the same period in 2013. Meanwhile half of all racist attacks in France take Jews as their target, even though they number less than 1% of the population.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 19, 2015 9:27 AM

This great, but sobering article was written in January 2015, and unfortunately, the situation has not improved.  There is a lot of demographic changes and migration happening in the Western World right now, and this is but one component to larger forces reshaping the Europe.  Today many in the French Jewish community are now asking the uncomfortable question: is it time to leave France for good?  Antisemitism is not a thing of the past relegated to the World War II chapter of our history textbooks; many French Jewish families were originally from North Africa before they fled in the 1950s and 60s.  Now, France is Israel's largest source of migrants and Europe as a whole has a rapidly declining Jewish population (UPDATE: here is a video showing the French Prime Minister vowing to stop the rise of anti-Semitism in in France).    

 

Tags: Judaism, religion, Europe, migration, Israel,  France, racism, conflict.

Chris Costa's curator insight, October 5, 2015 2:44 PM

It's saddening to see the persistence of such antiquated hatred in the 21st century; for a self-proclaimed age of enlightenment, we continue to act very ignorantly. France has long since prided itself on the ideas of equality and freedom that it put forward to the world during their tumultuous revolution, but that is not being reflected in both its treatment of Muslims and, particularly, its Jewish minority. The fact that 1% of the nation's population accounts for over half of its racist attacks is a jaw-dropping statistic, and indictment of a lack of tolerance as a whole in French society. I often read of the frustration of French Muslims- many of whom are of Algerian descent- who feel ostracized in the nation they call home. A Franco-muslim soccer player, Karim Benzema, summed up this sentiment when he said, "When I am playing well, I am French. When I'm playing poorly, I'm "just" a Muslim." I must imagine that the Jewish population feels much the same way; to feel such open discrimination must make one feel like an outsider in your own home. I hope that the current French Prime Minister, who has said that they plan to take a much firmer stand against this anti-semitism, stays true to their word and takes the necessary measures to insure the safety of ALL French citizens.

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, October 9, 2015 6:18 AM

The mass migration of Jews from Europe is an underreported story in the United States. Many people wrongly assume that Anti-Semitism  ended when the allies emerged victorious over Hitler and his Third Reich. However, the recent rash of religiously motivated attacks against Jews is demonstrating that the historical strand of Anti-Semitism still exists in Europe.  The number of attacks on Jews in France over the past few years is staggering and shocking. The people of France should feel ashamed that such acts are occurring in a nation that prides itself on the rights of man. The problem is much broader than just the tragic events in France. Anti-Semitism is on the rise in many European nations. I would shutter to think that the Western World is entering another period of violence and hatred directed and aimed at the Jewish community. Europe must act fast, or we may end up with an entire continent without a Jewish population.

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Why is EU free movement so important?

Why is EU free movement so important? | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Where did the idea of free movement of people come from? The precursor to the EU was formed as European leaders came together in the wake of the Second World War, wanting to prevent another catastrophic war. The idea was that allowing people to move across the continent - from countries where there were no jobs to countries where there were labour shortages - would not only boost European growth, but would help prevent war by getting people to mix more across borders.

"The founding fathers of the European Community wanted it to be a construct that also had a political integration and for that you needed people to move because the minute people crossed boundaries and borders, you had deeper integration… So it was both a social as well as an economic aim.

 

Tags: Europe, supranationalism, economic, mobility, political, states, migration.


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Stephen Zimmett's curator insight, August 15, 2015 11:39 AM
A great read
Mark Hathaway's curator insight, October 9, 2015 6:57 AM

Immigration is a major source of tension within Europe. The influx of immigrants into Europe has led to a nativist backlash in many nations. The free movement of people is a bedrock principle of the European Union. In the aftermath of the Second World War, the leaders of Europe hoped that the open borders policy would  prevent another costly war by allowing people to move to were there were jobs were located. The mixing of cultures would also prevent war. People would develop an understanding of other cultures, which would make the possibility of war more remote. The leaders did not account for the strong nativist strand that often runs through many nations. The UK is threating to withdraw from the EU over this immigration issue. While immigration on the United States gets much of the attention, a more serous crises is actually occurring in Europe.

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Pressed by Debt Crisis, Doctors Leave Greece in Droves

Pressed by Debt Crisis, Doctors Leave Greece in Droves | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Greece is losing professionals as they flee for more stable employment elsewhere, and the health care sector has been particularly hard hit.

 

Tags: Greece, Europe, migration, supranationalism, currency, economic.


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cantatapledge's comment, July 3, 2015 6:34 AM
Thats brilliant
Mark Hathaway's curator insight, October 9, 2015 6:45 AM

The economic troubles in Greece have dominated the headlines in Europe and the United States over the past few years. One major consequence of the continuing economic struggle is the fleeing of talented individuals from the nation of Greece. One of the hardest hit sectors in the Greek economy, is the heath care sector. Trained medical professionals are fleeing Greece in droves for better economic opportunities  elsewhere. The consequences of this mass migration from Greece can not be overstated. A nation needs talented people in order to survive. The loss of talented professionals sends a bad message to the rest of the country. The message sent to the people is basically, our nation is no longer viable enough to keep our most talented people living here.  This trend will likely continue as the Greek government has yet to come up with a viable solution to their debt crises.

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Tourism in Belfast, Ireland

"Belfast has been coming into its own in the last few years, developing a vibrant restaurant scene, award-winning architecture and a new cosmopolitanism."

 

Tags: Ireland, culture, architecture, tourism, Europe.


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 19, 2015 1:56 PM

Have you ever wondered why Northern Ireland a part of the U.K.?  Read this article from the Economist

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Belgium and the Netherlands Swap Land, and Remain Friends

Belgium and the Netherlands Swap Land, and Remain Friends | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
The discovery of a headless corpse in the Netherlands helped Belgium and its bigger Dutch neighbor resolve a property squabble that began in 1961.

 

In a region that has long known geopolitical and linguistic squabbles, and where Belgium has lived in the shadow of its neighbor, the land swap was anything but inevitable. In 1961, when the Meuse was reconfigured to aid navigation, it had the side effect of pushing three pieces of land onto the wrong side of the river. The uninhabited area subsequently gained a reputation for lawlessness, wild parties and prostitution.

 

Tags: borders, political, territoriality, Belgium, Netherlands, unit 4 political, Europe.


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Bratislava EU meeting: Merkel says bloc in 'critical situation'

Bratislava EU meeting: Merkel says bloc in 'critical situation' | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
The EU is in a "critical situation", the German chancellor says, as leaders meet to discuss ways to regain trust after the UK's vote to leave the bloc.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 19, 2016 5:08 PM

Some of this article is focused on the micro-issues of the day, but the larger issues of what is the proper role for an economic supranational organization is front and center.  Should the EU have a military headquarters?  How should the member states respond to the underlying tensions in the Union?  Attached is a video showing residents of EU countries with a wide range of opinions about the organization and what it's future should be and another video about the major topics on the table.  Given that the politicians there are balancing personal, national, and European interests, it is a sticky wicket (if British phrases are still allowed, even if they are the only member state not invited to the summit).   

 

Tags: Europe, supranationalism, economic, political, video.

Danielle Adams's curator insight, September 19, 2016 5:18 PM
Geo 152
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Why Italy’s 'Fertility Day' is backfiring

Why Italy’s 'Fertility Day' is backfiring | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"Facing a low fertility rate (1.4), Italy is holding its first 'Fertility Day' on Sept. 22, which will emphasize 'the beauty of motherhood and fatherhood' and host roundtable discussions on fertility and reproductive health. That may seem inoffensive, but the country’s health department is trying to raise awareness with an ad campaign that’s striking many as misguided and, worse, sexist and alarmist."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 2, 2016 8:47 AM

This pro-natalist campaign designed by the health ministry has received near universal criticism (in an attempt to see other perspectives, I searched for a more positive or even neutral article on the topic and came up empty-handed).  Italy's Prime Minister openly scoffed at the premise of the campaign, and many pundits argue that it shames and pressures women into thinking about personal choices of childbearing as if they were communal responsibilities.  Unlike the infamous 'Do it For Denmark' advertisements that were filled with playful innuendos, or Singapore's 'Maybe Baby' which highlights the joys of parenthood, this one has more overtones of duty and plays on fear more than those other pro-natalist campaigns.      

 

Tags:  ItalyEurope, declining populations, population, demographic transition model, modelsunit 2 population. 

 

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, September 5, 2016 7:28 AM
Preliminary - population
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Flags of Europe Explained

Fifty minutes of flags! All the flags of Europe from the Nordics to the Balkans. All the segments are here, some with some errors fixed. Enjoy Thank you s

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Dustin Fowler's curator insight, July 5, 2016 7:30 PM
I admit that I have not watched this in its entirety (or even its majority), but I wanted to share, because I find it fascinating, and I feel like you need to know it's there!  I look forward to watching more of it in the near future! 
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In stunning decision, Britain votes to leave the E.U.

In stunning decision, Britain votes to leave the E.U. | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
The country opted to become the first ever to leave the 28-member bloc in a result that will send economic and political shockwaves across the globe.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 24, 2016 9:05 AM

The foundations of the European Union have their historical roots in World War II.  To ensure that European countries stop attacking each other, they knit their economies together and cooperated more on political and economic policies.   

The UK has narrowly voted to leave the European Union (52%-48%).  The Brexit (Britain + Exit) was expected to be close, but shows discontent with London.  The ‘Remain’ campaign dominated in London, Scotland and Northern Ireland while the ‘Leave’ campaign found its strength across England and Wales (see maps). 

The fallout of this vote is big and far-reaching.  The first global reaction was financial panic as numerous stock exchanges plummeted.  UK Prime Minister David Cameron will resign.  Already Spain is calling for joint control of Gibraltar (which they’ve wanted anyway) and using this as an opportunity to advance a Spanish agenda.  Many in Scotland chose to stay in the UK in part because they wanted Scotland to remain in the EU.  Another referendum on Scottish Independence feels eminent at this point.       

Still confused?  Here are answers to 9 frequently asked questions about the Brexit as well as a good overview from on the economic issues from the Economist.

   

Tags: Europe, supranationalism, economic, political.

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Amid economic concerns, the U.K. considers an EU exit

"The U.K. has been a member of the European Union for more than 40 years, but that partnership might come to an end amid British concerns over eurozone turmoil and the ongoing refugee crisis. British voters will soon hold a referendum to decide whether or not to exit the EU. Judy Woodruff talks to Steven Erlanger of the New York Times for the possible implications of a U.K.-EU split."

Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks's insight:

The European Union at one time seemed as though it would continue to further and further integrate European politics and economics.  With talk of possibly leaving the EU and a referendum on whether the UK should stay in the EU or not, the EU offered some extra special exemptions for the UK.  For a more shorter video on this topic, see this TestTube video.    

 

Tags: Europe, supranationalism, economic, political.

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ismokuhanen's curator insight, March 27, 2016 7:30 AM

The European Union at one time seemed as though it would continue to further and further integrate European politics and economics.  With talk of possibly leaving the EU and a referendum on whether the UK should stay in the EU or not, the EU offered some extra special exemptions for the UK.  For a more shorter video on this topic, see this TestTube video.    

 

Tags: Europe, supranationalism, economic, political.

MsPerry's curator insight, March 31, 2016 12:56 PM

The European Union at one time seemed as though it would continue to further and further integrate European politics and economics.  With talk of possibly leaving the EU and a referendum on whether the UK should stay in the EU or not, the EU offered some extra special exemptions for the UK.  For a more shorter video on this topic, see this TestTube video.    

 

Tags: Europe, supranationalism, economic, political.

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Catalonia independence: Parliament votes to start secession from Spain

Catalonia independence: Parliament votes to start secession from Spain | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
The Spanish region of Catalonia adopts a resolution supporting independence from Spain, but Spain's PM says his government will challenge it.

 

Tags: Catalonia, Spain, political, devolution, autonomy, Europe, culture.


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Kevin Nguyen's curator insight, December 7, 2015 11:45 AM

I've never heard of this country until recently when I came across a video on youtube about it. In my opinion, Catalonia has the right to secede from Spain because there are many ethnic group wanting their own dependence around the world and it doesn't feel like it's a part of another country. However, it all comes down to politics and Spain wants as much territory as it can get. Plus Catalonia is doing pretty for itself and the Spanish definitely want a part of that.

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 13, 2015 1:25 PM

the Catalonia independence movement is just a small part of a large number of regions which were once autonomous and wish to be again. with so many of these areas in Europe the independence movements are finding hard to get support from other nations.

Raymond Dolloff's curator insight, December 15, 2015 1:29 AM

Challenging succession is a difficult task. First of all, there has to be a vote by the people and there has to be a strong driving force to get a positive outcome on the vote. The Prime Minister of Spain claims he will try to block it by filing a suit with the Constitutional Court. Succession of a country faces many hurdles especially if it does not have a strong vote to succeed and the opposition vote is strong.

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Catalonia independence: Parliament votes to start secession from Spain

Catalonia independence: Parliament votes to start secession from Spain | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
The Spanish region of Catalonia adopts a resolution supporting independence from Spain, but Spain's PM says his government will challenge it.


Tags: Catalonia, Spain, political, devolution, autonomy, Europe, culture.


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Kevin Nguyen's curator insight, December 7, 2015 11:45 AM

I've never heard of this country until recently when I came across a video on youtube about it. In my opinion, Catalonia has the right to secede from Spain because there are many ethnic group wanting their own dependence around the world and it doesn't feel like it's a part of another country. However, it all comes down to politics and Spain wants as much territory as it can get. Plus Catalonia is doing pretty for itself and the Spanish definitely want a part of that.

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 13, 2015 1:25 PM

the Catalonia independence movement is just a small part of a large number of regions which were once autonomous and wish to be again. with so many of these areas in Europe the independence movements are finding hard to get support from other nations.

Raymond Dolloff's curator insight, December 15, 2015 1:29 AM

Challenging succession is a difficult task. First of all, there has to be a vote by the people and there has to be a strong driving force to get a positive outcome on the vote. The Prime Minister of Spain claims he will try to block it by filing a suit with the Constitutional Court. Succession of a country faces many hurdles especially if it does not have a strong vote to succeed and the opposition vote is strong.

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Migrant crisis: Neighbours squabble after Croatia U-turn

Migrant crisis: Neighbours squabble after Croatia U-turn | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Croatia reverses its policy on allowing in migrants and instead transports hundreds northwards, angering Hungary and Slovenia.

Via Seth Dixon
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Mark Hathaway's curator insight, October 9, 2015 9:58 AM

The influx of Syrian refuges has caused a major controversy  in Europe. The crises has ripped open the hotly debated topic of immigration into Europe. Many nations are refusing to take the refuges in. Hungary and Slovenia have been two of the most vocal opponents of letting migrants and refuges into Europe. They are continuing to hold to their closed borders policy. Both nations have become angered by the Croatian governments recent decision to reverse course and allow refuges into their country. This topic will continue to be debated in Europe. In the United States the issue of Syrian refuges has also become a political issue. President Obamas decision to take in some refuges has caused a political controversy to erupt. Some on the right, including Donald Trump have come out against opening American borders to the refuges.

Matthew Richmond's curator insight, October 26, 2015 1:02 PM

Croatia has reversed it's policy on the current migrant problem in Europe and the middle east. This is just a deplorable situation that seems to have no end in sight. While I understand the argument that other Islamic countries should be willing to take them, the current status quo simply can't be allowed to continue any longer.

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 13, 2015 2:08 PM

of course Croatia has decided to let people through. they can only suffer if they try to stop migrants at their border, especially when the migrants are trying to get to countries to the north. if we compare the cost of trying and failing to keep out migrants and the cost of busing them to the northern boarder, we may find that the cost is smaller when they simply bus the migrants to the boarder and forget about them.

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Geography & Current Events
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Map: The fall of the Soviet Union made the world more wooded

Map: The fall of the Soviet Union made the world more wooded | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
How politics shaped nature in eastern Europe.

Via Mr. David Burton
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Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Navigate
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4 Maps Crucial to Understanding Europe's Population Shift

4 Maps Crucial to Understanding Europe's Population Shift | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Despite economic growth in Central and Eastern Europe, the continent is still migrating to the Northwest.

Via Seth Dixon, Bonnie Bracey Sutton, Suvi Salo
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Sally Egan's curator insight, November 23, 2015 6:42 PM

These contemporary maps help undetrstand the changing global population distribution.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 7, 2015 4:53 PM

The two maps that received my attention the most was 'No Work for the Young' and "Big City Drain.' It bothers me to read that the young population of European citizens is out of work, even the cities that do well. Stockholm, a well off country has a you unemployment rate of 30 percent, and Sheffield is 35 percent, that is huge! As for Big City Drain, although Europe's cities are growing, it is because of immigrants from other countries and migrants from that country moving to another part, just to find better work. Having immigrants does not help a particular countries population. Also the fact that since big cities are more expensive, people will leave the big cities such as London and Paris to find cheaper means of living. 

Raymond Dolloff's curator insight, December 15, 2015 1:01 AM

Population shifts are an important part of determining migrating trends of a population. Are they going to more urban areas? Are they going to suburban areas?  These maps can help understand the questions regarding where the higher population trends are and what countries are seeing a drop in their population to people moving to new places and creating new lives.

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Mrs. Watson's Class
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5 ways Europe is trying to convince its citizens to make more babies

5 ways Europe is trying to convince its citizens to make more babies | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
In Denmark, teachers encourage their students to someday make babies as well as practice safe sex.

Via Nancy Watson
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