AP HUMAN GEOGRAPH...
Follow
Find tag "English"
4.0K views | +1 today
AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Textbooks from Leadership Think Tank
Scoop.it!

Geography Game

Geography Game | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

Via Gust MEES, Aki Puustinen
more...
Gust MEES's curator insight, July 12, 9:31 AM

Try it out!

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Textbooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

A tour of the British Isles in accents

Got the audio here - http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p01slnp5 The person doing the voice is Andrew Jack who is a dialect coach.

 

Tags: language, culture, English, UK.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Sascha Humphrey's curator insight, April 6, 1:33 AM

He's really quite good, and the seamless change of dialect is quite impressive!

Michael MacNeil's curator insight, April 6, 8:32 AM

The diversity of the English language is amazing.  Even in the "motherland" it changes from location to location...aye bay goom.

Melissa Marshall's curator insight, April 9, 7:19 PM

This is a really interesting video for understanding regional dialect differences!

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Textbooks from SoRo class
Scoop.it!

Lexical Distance Among the Languages of Europe

Lexical Distance Among the Languages of Europe | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

  This chart shows the lexical distance — that is, the degree of overall vocabulary divergence — among the major languages of Europe. The size of each circle represents the number of speakers ...

 

And yes, English has its deepest roots in German...the French aspects were tacked on after the Norman Conquest.


Via Seth Dixon, Clairelouise
more...
ethanrobert's curator insight, March 19, 7:20 AM

This is a wonderful map that truly shows language families and their roots. In Europe, I was rather surprised when I seen that the Romance branch was much larger than that of the Germanic. All of the ancient Germanic groups such as the Jutes, Angols, and the Saxons were well versed in combat. Considering they conquered much of Western Europe, how is it that the Romance group is bigger than the Germanic? Also, in Eastern Europe, the Albanian language has no reason to exist. In a region dominated by the Slavic group with no environmental barriers, the Albanian language should not exist.~Ethan.

Arya Okten's curator insight, March 27, 7:33 PM

Unit II

Ness Crouch's curator insight, March 28, 5:43 PM

This isn't my normal area of interest but I found this fascinating!

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Textbooks from Interesting - fun facts and more
Scoop.it!

25 English Language Oddities - Listverse

25 English Language Oddities - Listverse | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Many cultures find that English might possibly be one of the most difficult languages to learn. Not, in fact, for its words, but for the fact that it has s

Via QuizFortune
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Textbooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

17th century London visualized

"Six students from De Montfort University have created a stellar 3D representation of 17th century London, as it existed before The Great Fire of 1666. The three-minute video provides a realistic animation of Tudor London, and particularly a section called Pudding Lane where the fire started. As Londonist notes, “Although most of the buildings are conjectural, the students used a realistic street pattern [taken from historical maps] and even included the hanging signs of genuine inns and businesses” mentioned in diaries from the period."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
harish magan's comment, November 6, 2013 10:02 AM
Great Source for studies.
Tony Aguilar's curator insight, November 7, 2013 11:53 PM

London in the 1700's was a chacterised by buildings that were very tighly packed together with obviously little fire code. There buildings are similiar to other communities thrughout Europe and areas in Switzerland. This remake of the past gives the student an animated journey into an  England that once was before the fire. It appears preindustrial revolution and shows how the economy was run by individual businesses and markets, its always interesting to look into the past and see the way the same cities exist today. Most importantly we learn and have the best fire codes possible

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 16, 2013 8:24 AM

For someone who loves history as much as i do this was a real treat. It honest makes you feel as if you could hop on a plane and travel there right now. Also as someone who has walked the streets of london you can see glimpses of these times within the architechture and the city planning. Great video really makes me nostalgic for a time in which was way before myself.

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Textbooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Geography/Common Core Webinar

Geography/Common Core Webinar | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"If you're concerned about Common Core and how geography fits in then don't miss this informative event. We'll dive into resources that were designed to expand the definition of text, show the alignment between the ELA common core standards and Geography for Life along with suggesting teaching ideas. This presentation will focus on the ELA and Geography Interconnections document that was created to support educators. The session will also highlight the National Geographic Common Core website and the resources available. Join us for a look into Common Core Standards and Geography Education!"


Via Seth Dixon
more...
leon portman's curator insight, August 27, 2013 11:28 AM

!

Kelsea Messina's curator insight, August 29, 2013 5:18 PM

professional development!

ParentPreppers's curator insight, August 31, 2013 4:28 AM

Looks interesting...

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Textbooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

What Do We Mean by 'Reading' Maps?

What Do We Mean by 'Reading' Maps? | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
The common-core standards present an ambiguous message on how to draw information from maps and charts, Phil Gersmehl says.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
mufidmmn's comment, July 24, 2013 1:08 AM
ngapain itu ya
Taryn Coxall's curator insight, August 5, 2013 6:38 PM

This is a resource i feel would be relevant to those students who struggle to be egaged in their reading

This can be used on readers on many different level

the reading maps foccus on language arts, Its description is communicated through charts, graphs, and maps intead of normal paragraphs and text

Shelby Porter's comment, September 30, 2013 8:19 AM
I feel the skill of reading a map is very important, but it becoming less prevalent in classrooms. Teachers may find it more difficult to teach and therefore are not going in depth with it. I remember as a child in grade school we would color maps or have to find where the states are. We never were taught how to fully understand the uses of a map and all the different ways they are used and how to read them. It is becoming a lost skill in a world that needs to be more appreciative of geography.
Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Textbooks from HMHS History
Scoop.it!

Maps of Panem - The Hunger Games

Maps of Panem - The Hunger Games | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
From The Hunger Games trilogy: different perspectives on the country of Panem.

Via Seth Dixon, Michael Miller
more...
Chris Scott's curator insight, July 2, 2013 8:02 AM

As I looked at this map, it amazes me at how the post-apocalyptic North America could look like. I read the books and I actually did not think of some of North America being partially submerged.

 

Cam E's curator insight, January 28, 9:50 AM

An interesting imagination of the Districts in the Hunger Games and where they might be in North America (excluding Cental American and the Carribean). All of these seem to come from some sort of common sense perspective based on the actual products from each region. We can see that the region which produces Electronics would be the geographical equivilent to California, which is well known for their technology within the Silicon Valley region. Some of these regions elude my minimal knowledge in Geography, and I can only guess at their purpose. Could the Luxury Item District be a tongue-in cheek joke about Las Vegas? Or even Hollywood? The "Peacekeepers" district being centered somewhat near Texas and the border with Mexico makes me wonder if it's placed there because of our border fence with Mexico.

Gabbie J's curator insight, May 9, 5:16 PM

If you have ever read the Hunger Games series , then you were probably curious on where the districts are located. These are some interpretations that other people have made to try and fulfill the Hunger Games fans needs for a conclusion . You could even see what district you would live in if you lived in Panem. 

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Textbooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The United States of YA

The United States of YA | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
A while back, I posted in the forums asking for people to help me find a YA book for every single state in the US.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
SchoolandUniversity's comment, February 15, 2013 11:17 PM
The United States of YA. Hey guys! This isn't an official challenge, but I really wanted to do it.
Lori Johnson's comment, February 16, 2013 6:49 AM
My favorites on the list: Under the Blood Red Sun, Deadline, The Fault in our Stars, and Dairy Queen.
Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, February 16, 2013 4:37 PM

This is for all you avid readers out there!

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Textbooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Back to School with Google Earth

Back to School with Google Earth | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Amazing things about Google Earth - news, features, tips, technology, and applications...

 

If you've never seen the Google Earth Blog, this post is a good primer to the educational possibilities that this technology opens up to teachers.  It is not just for geography teachers; it can be a visualization tool for any subject that has real-world applications that take place somewhere. 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Lindsey Robinson's comment, August 27, 2012 2:22 PM
Google Earth is an amazing way to teach children of all ages (and adults for that matter) about the geography of the Earth. It is such an abstract way of conveying geographic concepts. What an amazing teaching tool....and as an added bonus, it's FREE!!
Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Textbooks from Teachers Toolbox
Scoop.it!

WATCH: Yup, The English Language Is Insane

WATCH: Yup, The English Language Is Insane | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Seriously, what is with the English language? Why is the plural of box boxes, but the plural of ox oxen? It makes no sense, people!

ASAP Thought's poem "English is Crazy" helps us break down all the ways English is well, insane. Grammar...

Via Ms. Harrington
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Textbooks from teaching and technology
Scoop.it!

European word translator

European word translator | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Translate any word from English to more than 30 other European languages, on a map

Via Seth Dixon, The Rice Process
more...
Melissa Marshall's curator insight, April 9, 7:23 PM

This is a fantastic resource for seeing how words have changed according to geography. Type a word into the box and see it translated directly on to a map in more than 30 languages. Great for teaching kids about regions of language, or asking how they think a certain country came to use a certain word. 

Mick D Kirkov's curator insight, April 11, 12:43 AM

Haha, hehe, hihi, or Ho-ho-ho! Maybe even huhuhuy!

Helen Rowling's curator insight, April 17, 1:57 PM

English; Toursim; Geography

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Textbooks from HISTORY RESEARCHER
Scoop.it!

World Interactive Map

World Interactive Map | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

Via Gust MEES, GSeremetakis
more...
Training in Business's curator insight, January 28, 4:31 PM

World Interactive Map 

 

Karleen Vaughn's curator insight, January 29, 1:20 PM

Saving this for my Social Studies classes ;)

Agueda Fernández's curator insight, January 30, 6:09 AM

Fantástico mapa interactivo muy útil para trabajo en aula.

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Textbooks from Human Geography Too
Scoop.it!

History of the English Language

History of the English Language | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"What we know as the English Language today has evolved over thousands of years, influenced by migrating tribes, conquering armies and peaceful trade. Do you know the origins of the language you speak? Have a look at this detailed infographic from  Brighton School of Business and Management."


Via Seth Dixon, Scarpaci Human Geography
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 12, 2013 7:26 AM

Languages, just like cultures, are incredibly dynamic and have changed over time.  Many people like to imagine an older version of their own culture of "how it used to be" or even "how it's always was."  This is an illusion though, to pretend as though cultural change is something new.  This fantasy allows for people to nostalgically yearn for what once was, even if that perceived pristine past was but a fleeting moment in history that was shaped by many other peoples, places and times. 


Tags: English, language, culture, infographic, historical.

Christian Allié's comment, July 2, 2013 1:41 AM
Interesting scale.....thanks!
joelle's comment, July 2, 2013 7:31 AM
:-)
Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Textbooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The Geography and Literacy Connection

The Geography and Literacy Connection | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"What do you think of when you hear the word literacy? Depending on what you teach, chances are geography is not the first thought that comes to mind. But believe it or not, geography and literacy naturally share many similarities. And you can deepen students’ learning in both geography and literacy when they are integrated in the curriculum."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Tony Aguilar's curator insight, November 3, 2013 9:49 PM

The geography and literacy connection helps new generation student apply common core to better be prepared in the 21st century for vocation and keen awareness of geopgraphy, history and the world around them. Common core allows them to apply critical thinking and connections to the wolrd around them including a thurough understanding of geopgraphy. History and geography are being integrated to apply a different way of preparing students and creating a better awareness of changes in our world. literacy will not only be focused on reading but studying and analyzing data and statistics that help them become better integrated in the world around them.

Ana Melo's curator insight, November 4, 2013 6:41 AM

Geography provides a lot of fundamental knowledge and gives you also a sense of place, which I find very relevant in times of globalization where you belong everywhere and nowhere simultaneously.

Chris Cividino's curator insight, November 7, 2013 9:06 PM

Understanding key terminology in geography is paramount to demonstrating deep knowledge of geographical concepts.

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Textbooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Maps as a Common Core Reading Tool

Maps as a Common Core Reading Tool | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
"Did you know know that there are some excellent reading opportunities in Story Maps? This map serves as a table of contents for using Story Maps with Common Core Reading Standards.  Reinventing the wheel isn't necessary with so many great maps and data sources that will help us teaching reading, writing and thinking with engaging content and little effort."
Via Seth Dixon
more...
Duke No Limit's curator insight, August 12, 2013 4:53 PM

wow very interesting

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, August 13, 2013 2:39 PM

Very important way of communication!

John Slifko's curator insight, August 13, 2013 3:23 PM

Increasinglly the historiography of Freemasonry will be mpaced by he discipiine of historical geogrphy combining empirical data, place and narrative drama and code. 


Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Textbooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Diagon Alley in Google StreetView

Diagon Alley in Google StreetView | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 9, 2013 6:15 PM

If you can't go to London and take the Warner Bros. studio tour, this is the next best thing: Diagon Alley in Street View.  This is some mapping to inspire your Harry Potter fans and possibly tie some English Language Arts will geospatial tools. 


Tags: mappinggoogle, funvirtual tours, EnglishLondon.

Maegan Anderson's comment, July 10, 2013 11:59 PM
This is interesting. Wish I could get there. :)
trampolinecalf's comment, September 26, 2013 11:55 PM
nice
Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Textbooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Google Lit Trips


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 16, 2013 4:09 PM

Google Earth is a great teaching tool for geographers, but it is also a way to bring geography and spatial thinking to other disciplines.  Google Lit Trips makes the journeys that take place in literature (both fiction and non-fiction) all the more real by mapping out the movements as a KML file that can be viewed in Google Earth.  By embedding pictures, websites, videos and text into the path, this becomes an incredibly interactive resource for teachers of all levels. 


Tags: google, virtual tours, English, edtech.

Ann-Laure Liéval's curator insight, March 17, 2013 4:51 AM

Utiliser Google Earth pour cartographier l'itinéraire de personnages de fiction, afin de mêler géographie et littérature. 

GoogleLitTrips Reading List's comment, March 19, 2013 7:30 PM
I'm very appreciative. Thanks! Jerome, GoogleLitTrips.com
Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Textbooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Linguistic Geography: My Fair Lady

This is a most decidedly dated reference for pop culture, but a great movie for making explicit the idea that the way we speak is connected to where we've lived (also a good clip to show class differences as well as gender norms). The clip highlights many principles and patterns for understanding the geography of languages.

 

Tags: Language, class, gender, culture, historical, London, unit 3 culture and place.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
João Carreira's comment, September 4, 2012 10:24 AM
...Even as portuguese, I apreceated it very much. Thank you.
Don Brown Jr's comment, September 6, 2012 6:30 AM
This movie clip does demonstrate how language is connected not only to space and location but individual or group experiences as well. The languages used by the upper and lower orders in addressing each other or an “outsider” are very distinct within this film. Therefore if you’re socioeconomic status effects the way you speak then perhaps the type of langue you use can indicate what different social groups within a society consider comical or entertaining such as dance and music?
Jess Pitrone's comment, April 29, 2013 6:18 PM
My Fair Lady has always been one of my favorite movies, and it really sparked my interest in linguistics and accents. Not only does your accent define where you’re from physically, but it defines where you’re from socially, as well. While Eliza Doolittle is from the same country, region, and city as Prof Higgins and the people coming out of the theater, she sounds completely different. Right away, her speech gives away what kind of social background she comes from.
Similarly to the “When did Americans lose their British accents?” article, this article helps relay how accents can help define a physical area, and it also shows a connection between accent and economics. Accent is both a cultural and an economic part of geography.
Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Textbooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Google Lit Trips

Google Lit Trips | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

Google Earth is a great teaching tool for geographers, but it is also a way to bring geography and spatial thinking to other disciplines.  Google Lit Tips marks the journeys that take place in literature (both fiction and non-fiction) all the more real by mapping out the movements as a KML file that can be viewed in Google Earth.  By embedding pictures, websites, videos and text into the path, this becomes an incredibly interactive resource for teachers of all levels.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Robin Manning's comment, May 3, 2012 3:02 PM
I make my students do one of these for their Spring Book Project - very fun.