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One Place, Two Names

One Place, Two Names | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
The government of the People’s Republic of China calls the country’s westernmost region Xinjiang, but the people who have lived there for centuries refer to their home as Eastern Turkistan. Many times when two groups do not refer to a place by the same name, it points to a cultural or political conflict, as is the case here.

Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 15, 11:23 AM

Multiple names on the map can hint at bigger cultural and political fault lines.  Is it Londonderry or just Derry?  The Sea of Japan or the East Sea?  This article I wrote for the National Geographic Education Blog is on the always simmering tensions in the China's westernmost province.  


TagsCentral Asia, toponyms, culture, political, conflictgovernance, China, East Asia, religionIslam, landscape.

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, April 15, 1:09 PM

This is definitely not the first time a dynamic like this happens and it will not be the last.  Whenever a country tries to incorporate a territory inhabited by a people with a different culture than their own into their sphere friction occurs.  Just like in Africa after the Berlin Conference, the Europeans experienced most resistance due to splitting up ethnic groups or making them live within the same realm as an enemy or outside group.  The indigenous people of Xinjiang, China are not Han Chinese.  They speak and identify more with a Turkish identity.  It is not hard to see that there is a big conflict of interest in the Northwestern corridor of China.

Bob Beaven's curator insight, April 16, 2:06 PM

This blog is interesting as it shows that China is not afraid of suppressing ethnic minorities to advance its goals.  As a social studies education major, with a focus in history, this reminds me of the USSR of old in a way.  Both countries contain ethnic minorities that are marginalized and discriminated against.  China's treatment of the people in Xinjiang or Eastern Turkistan as the natives call it is horrible.  The Communist Government is creating a culture that will push back, increasingly aggressively to the it.  If China doesn't handle this situation wisely, a Chechnya type situation could arise in the region.  China should do its best to prevent this, as this could be detrimental as the country would have to fight insurgents in its borders and it could become a target of the world wide Jihad of radicals in the Middle East.  As interesting as this article is, I actually never heard of this region, unlike Tibet which I learned about in High School.  However, as I said before this region has the possibility to influence the globe and China's reaction also plays into this situation.

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Japan's Disappearing Villages

Japan's Disappearing Villages | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
In the small town of Nagoro, population 35, one woman is trying to save her village from extinction by creating life-sized dolls for every inhabitant who either dies or moves away.

Via Seth Dixon
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Edgar Manasseh Jr.'s curator insight, April 12, 3:53 PM

Okay very creepy but the woman trying to save her village from extinction due to  urban migration. It kind of reminds of me a Native American tribe in a similar fashion because it shows the power and history of the village and the connection it has with her. So by creating life sized dolls for the people who either died or moved away kind of creates a certain spirit of that person in whom stays behind with her, leaving the village the same, even if its actually not their physically but spiritually the tradition of their place still remains and the history would continue to live on very deep and interesting.

Bob Beaven's curator insight, April 16, 2:13 PM

I was both slightly creeped out by this article, as well as moved by it.  Urbanization has been increasingly going on in Japan.  In fact, when I think of the country, I think of the hustle and crowds of Tokyo.  Another factor playing into Japan's villages disappearing is that the birth rates in Japan are very low, in fact the country is losing population due to the fact that more people are dying than being born.  Viewing this town, it was pretty sad to see the dolls recreating scenes that living people once did in this town.  It is also eery because these dolls stay in the same position doing the same thing forever, it is kind of like a museum of what life was once like in a dying town.  It must be a hard thing to see happening to a place where one's family have lived for generations. 

 

Lora Tortolani's curator insight, April 20, 1:43 PM

Due to urban migration, this village of Nagoro is said to be one of 10,000 small towns that will disappear in Japan.  I've been to some small towns in Japan and can say there is so much more culture in these villages than there is in the big cities.  I got a totally different feeling in my sole than when I ended my trip in Tokyo.  While both parts of the country have its pros and cons, it is terrible to think that these villages will be defeated to the rise of urbanism.   

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China’s Pearl River Delta overtakes Tokyo as world’s largest megacity

China’s Pearl River Delta overtakes Tokyo as world’s largest megacity | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Several hundred million more people are expected to move to cities in East Asia over the next 20 years as economies shift from agriculture to manufacturing and services, according to a World Bank report

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Seth Forman's curator insight, March 23, 4:46 PM

Summary: This article talks about population density in the Chinese pearl river delta. It compares population density to other places as well as talking about how factors like urbanization effect population density.

 

Insight: This article is significant because it shows that even today physical geography can lead to urbanization and still effect population density.  

 

 

Louis Mazza's curator insight, March 26, 2:16 PM

Tokyo has been overtaken as the world’s largest megacity by China’s Pearl River Delta. The Megacity, Pearl River Delta, covers most of China’s manufacturing hotspots including cities of Shenzhen, Guangzhou, Foshan and Dongguan. This megacity now houses more people than in Canada, Argentina, or Australia. Over the next 20 years several million more people are expected to move to these East Asian Cities. The kind of urbanization that took place in Europe and Americas are starting to develop in East Asia. East Asia already contains 8 megacities and 123 cities with a population between 1-10 million people.

Dawn Haas Tache's curator insight, April 8, 12:39 PM

APHG- HW Option 7

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Hong Kong’s umbrella revolution

Hong Kong’s umbrella revolution | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
The story behind the Hong Kong pro-democracy protests

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Giselle Figueroa's curator insight, October 8, 2014 2:52 PM

What caught my attention was the name that this protest has ("umbrella revolution”). After investigating I could find why this protest has that name, the reason is  because the people who are protesting  used umbrellas to protect themselves from tear gas.The Occupy Central movement ( which is  a civil disobedience campaign initiated by Benny Tai Yiu-ting, Associate Professor of Law at the University of Hong Kong , and advocated by Occupy Central with Love and Peace) threatens to block financial and commercial center of Hong Kong if their demands are neglected: the resignation of the Chief Executive, Leung Chun-ying and the possibility of holding truly democratic elections in 2017. If none of the parties can agree I think there will be any solution for both parties and this will continue.

Edelin Espino's curator insight, October 10, 2014 2:56 PM

The umbrella revolution in Hong Kong is simply that Protestants are using all kind of tools to block the tear gas that the police are pulling them. Protests in Hong Kong are to change some of the rules that Beijing has also want Leung Chun-ying resign his position. The vast majority of the protesters are young and who began the protests were also young people who are fighting for the good of their city.

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China publishes new map

China publishes new map | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
China has published a new map of the entire country including the islands in the South China Sea (West Philippine Sea) in order to "better show" its territorial claim over the region.

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Alec Castagno's curator insight, December 17, 2014 10:50 PM

The new map published by the Chinese government is a clear message of what they feel are their territorial boundaries. In areas that are contested between China and other countries, the map makes a bold claim that these areas belong to China. Chinese activities in these disputed areas match up with the attitude conveyed by this map.

Jason Schneider's curator insight, April 2, 9:44 PM

Not only does China have a strong economic system and the high population in the world, but they also claim South China Sea. Also since they are wealthy, then they hire maritime security to make sure other areas such as the Philippines and Malaysia don't attempt to take over China's seas. Also, the Philippines attempts to battle China over oil and natural gases but they fail against China because China's more populated than the Philippines. The main point of this map is to show how much of the ocean and sea China claims and they claim about 18% of water out of their land population.

David Lizotte's curator insight, April 23, 1:09 PM

This map exemplifies how different countries have differing impressions of land/territory that they own. China views itself as this image depicted above. They honestly believe it. As ridiculous as it sounds I do understand why. China owns this region of the world and will continue to do so. They are claiming land and even forming new land throughout the South China Sea. What is important about the creating of land mass is that China then controls 200 nautical miles around whatever they construct. There is nothing the neighboring countries in the region can do about it. China knows it is a dominant military power and intimidates other countries.

For example, the island of Taiwan is claimed by China as a province. China does not recognize the "Republic of China" (ROC) which governs Taiwan and used to govern mainland China prior to the Chinese Civil War. China has even threatened the island with military use if the people openly declare a massive independent movement. There is a lot more to this history, more than a scoop can provide for, however in a nutshell, Taiwan is China's and will continue to be so. 

In another region of China bordering India and Pakistan, which conveys the expansive territory China covers as a country and its various neighboring countries, China is yet claiming another piece of land. As if the dispute between India and Pakistan was not great enough the two countries also differ over territory just north of the Kashmir border region. China also believes this territory is theirs, now making the land up for grabs between the three nations. China may or may not have historical ties that link it to this piece of land. But in either case it certainly views this territory as an area of land that is open for taking, in that it could eventually claim the territory as a whole. What would Pakistan and India do? These two countries have enough going on. 

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Military Shift For Japan?

Military Shift For Japan? | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"Citing threats from China and North Korea, a government-appointed panel is urging Japan to reinterpret its pacifist constitution to allow the use of military force to defend other countries."


Via Seth Dixon, Leigha Tew
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Bob Beaven's curator insight, April 16, 2:27 PM

Japan was once one of the great military powers in the world, and during World War II, they proved that they were a ferocious, determined foe who would not surrender easily.  Following the end of WWII, the Americans were determined that Japan would never again be able to wage large scale war again.  Fast forward to the present, where the two countries are now great allies and are fearful of Chinese and North Korean power and Japan still has its hands tied behind its back, metaphorically speaking.  Japan now wants its military to be more active so it can take part in UN Peacekeeping missions world wide and it also wants to give the United States help throughout the world.  I believe that this would be a beneficial thing and so does the United States.  The Chinese are not so enthused about Japan's increasingly militaristic attitude due to the fact that the two nations are age old rivals.  I think it will be interesting to observe what happens, as Japan wants to break free of its restraints so to say, in order to take a more active role in the world.  However, China shouldn't be as worried as they seem to be because Japan's population is highly aging, they are not the same country they were in the WWII Era, and neither is China.

Lora Tortolani's curator insight, April 20, 2:08 PM

Since World War II, Japan has stayed behind the scenes and committed to be a peaceful country under Article 9 of the constitution.  Recent threats have seemed to open the eyes of Japanese military and they are considering to "make more international contributions by deepening its relations with the U.S. and expanding its ties with countries other than America."  America of course supports the decision and hopes that it will take on some of its military burden.  This change will not only strengthen the military, but also Japan's economy.

David Lizotte's curator insight, April 23, 1:42 PM

This is an extremely important event in Japanese history. What's neat is how America is in support of japan having a great military role both nationally and internationally. Yes, it is up to the Japanese to deliberate and set forth this plan, so one will see what comes of it. I believe they will decide engaging in the constructing of a greater military force will be the way to go. It makes sense.

This article was very suggestive in referring to the growing threats that exist in the East China Sea. If Japan wants to increase its military power and become a player in defense of itself and other countries then the situation must be worsening. North Korea and China has been growing and are now a threat to Japan, which in a way makes them a threat to America too (which is no secret). Now, Japan is saying the expansion of a military is strictly for defense and they do not want to engage in any war. And by "they"/"Japan"  I mean the Prime Minister Shinzo Abe.

He does not want a military appearance that existed prior and during WWII. 

America benefits from this greatly. Yes the Pacific Ocean is a pretty big buffer between China and America however the presence of Japan acts as a buffer too. If Japan were to increase its military they would prove to be an even bigger buffer. Japan and America would be able to work in unison against Chinese and North Korean threats. Perhaps America would even gain more intelligence on the region, if they haven't gotten top of the line intelligence already. Japan wants to be able to protect itself from said threats. By doing so it would act as an initial first line of defense for America. 

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Eyewitness video of 2011 Tsunami

"This video captures some amazing footage of the 2011 tsunami in Japan."

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Mary Rack's comment, August 17, 2013 10:28 AM
I kept wondering what happened to the people filming & watching in the next few hours. How long before they were rescued? Where did they go then? I wish there were a way to find out. Since we have the video maybe we can get some information about them.
Sally Egan's curator insight, August 19, 2013 6:46 PM

Wow... nothing yu read or study can inform like the real footage.

 

gina lockton's curator insight, August 27, 2013 6:01 AM

Biophysical Geography - check this out!

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In China, one-child policy compounds loss of child for parents

In China, one-child policy compounds loss of child for parents | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
One-child policy leaves some parents childless, hopeless and facing financial ruin in old age.

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Antonio Martinez's comment, September 12, 2013 3:36 PM
I can understand why this law is enforced. The obvious reason is that China has an unusually high population compared to other countries. Although, this law definitely has it's downsides. One being that if your child dies such as in the car accident in the beginning of the article, then you will be childless for the rest of your life.
jacob benner's comment, September 14, 2013 5:11 PM
China is overpopulated and it its becoming a problem, but by forcing parents to only have one child is leading to other problems. The childless parents describe there life to be empty and full of depression and without their child they are running into financial issues. Most of the time it is to late for the parents to have another child.
Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 15, 2014 5:43 PM

I understand the issues China is having with their large population but the one-child policy hurts the average family. Problems occur when a family can only have one child. If anything were to happen to that child, whether he/she dies young, runs away or gets thrown in prison. That can leave the parents vulnerable later in life. When the parents become elderly they may not have a child to take care of them. China must find another way to control their population. 

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Assessing the Validity of Online Sources

Assessing the Validity of Online Sources | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

This is a fabulous map---but is the statement true?

 


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Melissa Marie Falco-Dargitz's curator insight, November 23, 2014 10:15 AM

The statement is true. When the populations of the countries highlighted are combined, 51% of the world’s population lives in the circle. But, this is a claim that could be easily just put out there. We have to look at where the information comes from. In this day and age, it is easy to manipulate numbers, images and ideas. The media has become spin masters.

Jason Schneider's curator insight, April 2, 9:40 PM

This is a debatable map but I agree that there are more people living in the southeast area of Asia than people living outside of it. However, I also believe that the differentiation in populations is not that far off. I think China is more specific in the southeastern part of Asia because it has the highest population than any other country in the world. Also, Indonesia has the highest Islamic population in the world in comparison to other countries. As an added bonus, all of these countries in southeast Asia such as India, Malaysia, Japan, Taiwan and the Philippines are popular for its increase in manufacturing companies higher than any other region in the world throughout the past century.

Lora Tortolani's curator insight, April 20, 2:12 PM

After discussing this picture in class, I know that the statement is true.  I find it incredible that the majority of the world's population lives inside that circle.  I can't even imagine how condense living space must be.  I again am finding myself very fortunate to live where and how I do. 

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China's Water Crisis

China's Water Crisis | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
For years, China claimed to hold an estimated 50000 rivers within its borders. Now, more than half of them have abruptly vanished.

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Paige Therien's curator insight, April 26, 2014 12:04 AM

China is attributing the disappearance of over 50 percent of their country's rivers to inaccurate sources; more effective technologies today give an accurate picture of China's waterways compared to the former data based off of sources from the  1950's.  While it is probably true to some extent that previous numbers were off, there still needs to be much concern for the state of China's current waterways and why waterways that once existed have disappeared.

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 3, 2014 4:48 PM

Cutting corners in safety and cleanliness has caused pollution in the rivers. All the money they saved cutting corners now has to be invested in diverting clean water to northern areas of the country. I hope someday they realize that you cannot do things super cheaply without paying for it in another area.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 9:41 PM

What has happened to these rivers? Are they purposely being depleted from China? How do they expect to supply water for their residents if they are building things over these used-to-be rivers?

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Life in North Korea

"David Guttenfelder, chief Asia photographer for the Associated Press wire service, sent these photos from North Korea straight to his Instagram account (in real time), a significant feat in a country where access is strictly controlled and where very few have Internet access."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 4, 2013 2:27 PM

On a side note, last week I posted about the joint South Korean/North Korea Industrial complex, essentially saying that as long as that remains open, this war talk from North Korea is all bravado.  Well, that industrial complex is now shut down


TagsNorth Korea.

Alec Castagno's curator insight, December 17, 2014 3:49 PM

These pictures offer a glimpse into North Korea, and show how outdated and old the country looks. The roads are mostly empty and any artwork is obvious pro-Kim propaganda. Some pictures feature caricatures of American soldiers, showing how they are used as a common enemy for the people to rally against. 

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Japan's Geographic Challenge

Stratfor examines Japan's primary geographic challenge of sustaining its large population with little arable land and few natural resources. For more analysi...

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Kevin Cournoyer's comment, May 1, 2013 12:51 AM
Unlike other larger, more geographically diverse countries, Japan is faced with the problem of a general lack of farmable land and natural resources. The fact that the country is itself an island does not make things any easier for it in an economic sense. The way the country is divided up also makes for a difficult political situation, as mountain ranges create division, and therefore, political disunity.
The proximity of the Korean peninsula and China to Japan is also important to examine. Whenever Japan wishes to acquire natural resources and other economically beneficial materials, Korea is the conduit through which Japan tends to invade the mainland, usually China. Because of this, we can see how Japan’s geographic location may cause strained relationships with its neighbors, both politically and economically. Alienating two of its closest neighbors would clearly be a disastrous move for Japan, but it may be seen as necessary due to its unfortunate geographic location.
Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, November 27, 2013 5:31 PM

It would make sense to me that for a place like Japan to sustain itself successfully, it would have to have some help from other areas with more resources.  Again with the concept- people don't choose to be born, or where they are born... To be born in Japan is as unchosen by that person as it would be in any other country.  I don't think people should have to pay for resources that they do not have available, especially because they are on an island/island chain that simply doesn't have what they need.  I am really repulsed by the bartering system because of absolute indication of beyond excessive surplus and profit and greed and all that garbage that humanity reeks of.  Yeah some people are happy, but we could be completely unburdened of all negativity if we banded together to rid the world of negativity itself.  I know that Japan would be happy to receive everything that they need for no cost, but I also know that many people would be willing to work, and more willing to work, if they didn't have expenses to pay for... it would really be serving their life's purpose as a component of humankind if they worked to help others, rather than to pay their monthly rent.  I don't have a clue how I would go about organizing a movement to transform this idea into a reality, but I'll work on that.  In the mean time, I would advise supranationalism for Japan, and hope that with the alliance of other countries, they can band together and make deals that work for the greater good of their country, population, and the world.

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, April 10, 2014 10:58 AM

This short video did a great job in explaining why Japan became expansionist in the decades leading up to WW II.  The mountainous nature of the islands and lack of arable land challenges Japan to provide food for its people.  To understand Japan you must understand her geography, this helps to understand why a country acted the way it did in the past and can be a predictor of future actions. 

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Struggle For Smarts? How Eastern And Western Cultures Tackle Learning

Struggle For Smarts? How Eastern And Western Cultures Tackle Learning | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
For the most part in American culture, intellectual struggle in school children is seen as an indicator of weakness, while in Eastern cultures it is not only tolerated, it is often used to measure emotional strength.

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Malcolm Haines's curator insight, September 21, 2014 12:20 AM

This is an important time in world history for learning how we all learn. Ultimately East vs West on the cultural field will no longer apply.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 17, 2014 5:31 PM

Today the a lot of focus is being spent on the differences between western and eastern education. A large catalyst in this research is the rise of East Asian economies and the fear many in the west have that their nations are quickly becoming the new under dogs. While their is a difference in education methods one must also wonder if it partially comes down to the government and cultural importance placed on education. During the Cold War America placed a ton of interest and support on our education but after peace came our nation education declined across the board. This might be similar in East Asia while in stead of seeking to overcome the Russians they are seeking to over come their current place in the global community.

Lora Tortolani's curator insight, April 20, 2:25 PM

I actually feel this is a great way to teach students, we just aren’t used to it in America.  The students who already know what they’re doing should be helping those who struggle.  When we boast about how well someone does at something, it can actually discourage the student who doesn’t understand.  It is definitely a tricky situation to be in, but I can understand why.

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New Images Show China Literally Gaining Ground in South China Sea

New Images Show China Literally Gaining Ground in South China Sea | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Satellite photos show the speed, scale and ambition China has exerted to assert ownership over South China Sea islands, far from the mainland.

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Marc Meynardi's curator insight, April 13, 2:40 AM

Suprisingly, the other countries dont show a lot of concerns.

Norka McAlister's curator insight, April 15, 10:06 PM

China is a powerful country with a population of 1.357 billion people. China as a regional hegemony, the more land means expansion of territorial control on the region and projecting sea power on international waters. However the main reason why China, the Philippines, and other countries are trying to claim these islands is due to the oil and natural gas exploitation in the South China Sea. Even when geopolitical conflicts between Philippines and other countries arise, any of these countries will have to form powerful armies in order to fight against China. The U.S. would be the only country that could pursue different strategies and mediate agreements between China’s neighbors. However, through military intimidation, China would overpower any country that tried to claim these islands as part of their territory. 

Lora Tortolani's curator insight, April 20, 1:37 PM

China has its hopes on securing the land that is rich in oil to bring prosperity to the country.  China is building a great wall of sand and seems as though they are not fearful of others stopping it even though China has been warned that these actions create tension from Taiwan, the Philippines, and Vietnam.  

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China building 'great wall of sand' in South China Sea

China building 'great wall of sand' in South China Sea | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
The scale of China's land reclamation in the South China Sea is leading to "serious questions" on its intentions, a top US official says.


China is building artificial land by pumping sand on to live coral reefs - some of them submerged - and paving over them with concrete. China has now created over 4sq/km (1.5 sq miles) of artificial landmass.  China is creating a great wall of sand with dredges and bulldozers over the course of months.


Tags: borders, political, conflict, water, China, East Asia.


Via Seth Dixon
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PIRatE Lab's curator insight, April 3, 10:45 AM

In addition to the original BBC article, here is another article from the Telegraph with some aerial imagery showing the extent of this geo-engineering project.  This has plenty of geopolitical implications and the United States government is on record saying that it is "concerned."

Danielle Lip's curator insight, April 6, 9:16 PM

Pumping in sand to cover coral reef and create more land is a very inventive way to make new territory, using concrete and placing bulldozers and other machinery is helping China gain more land and gain more access in the South China Sea yet this who pumping is making people question and causing places such as the Philippines to  file complaints saying they will not be associated with the whole plan that China has. Why is China exactly pumping sand and spreading concrete over the live coral reefs? Does China know they are killing live animals and plants underneath the sea? 

While looking into the matter I found that China believed the whole act of reclaiming land to be "entirely within China's sovereignty and are totally justifiable". Now people all over the world are focused on land and power, not about other social matters. This land pumping is not only causing conflict but it is creating more opportunity to better work and living conditions.

Bob Beaven's curator insight, April 16, 2:41 PM

China is a large and powerful nation that is not afraid of flexing military muscle to its smaller neighbors.  The developments of China building artificial land to strengthen its claim in the region shows how determined the country is to have its claims honored.  It also shows that China will stop at nothing to have regions were resources could be to aid in the countries economic growth.  However, China is causing a great deal of controversy through its actions.  Also, China's neighbors are becoming increasingly frustrated with the large nation, yet they are all much smaller nations that really can't prevent the Chinese from doing what they want, especially with China declaring it won't listen to what the UN has to say.  China is a country that is not afraid of strongman politics to get what it wants.

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The Political Geography of Hong Kong's Protests

The Political Geography of Hong Kong's Protests | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
The territory's residents are demanding democracy in city intersections, not central squares.

 

The significance of the protests, which have brought tens of thousands into the streets, lies not only in what protesters are demanding but also in where they're demanding it—and where they're not. Consider that pro-democracy demonstrations in Hong Kong typically happen in Victoria Park, which is about two and a half miles from Central District and which hosts the annual June 4 candlelight vigil commemorating the 1989 Tiananmen Square crackdown in Beijing. This time around, however, few police or protesters have ventured there.

The unpredictable, spontaneous geography of the protests is important precisely because it transcends the status quo. It is a testament to how serious these demonstrations are that they refuse to be contained.

Tags: political, conflict, governance, China, East Asia.


Via Seth Dixon, Jodi Esaili
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Alec Castagno's curator insight, October 7, 2014 10:02 AM

The increased visibility of the internet and globalization has made large scale demonstration not only a good way to show civil discontent but the preferred method of increasing awareness of an issues across the world. Because Hong Kong is such an integrated part of global economy, they can stage these massive protests without too much fear of violent police reaction, as the world will be quick to condemn such action as soon as it happens. While the protests started as a student movement, it has now spread throughout the city and both younger and older people, students and professionals, have begun to participate. This popular participation shows how serious these issues are to the people of Hong Kong.

Chandler and Zane's curator insight, October 16, 2014 4:44 PM

Political: There have been lots of protest lately in China. Chief executive CY Leung announced that he is planning to shut down Hong Kong's  central district. People are not happy with this and the protest are becoming very big for this little island. 

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 13, 2014 2:43 PM

The seemingly random geography of protests shows an inability to be contained and how demographics play a key role in these protests. The protests have broken up into multiple smaller groups, blocking off intersections, and popping up in different locations that are not traditionally used for protesting. Instead of amassing in one large group, the protesters are using an almost guerrilla-like tactic by breaking into smaller numbers that are harder to disband or predict. While protests were traditionally held in Victoria Park, these groups are popping up in all sorts of locations, including residential, school, tourist, and shopping locations. Many college and high school aged children are joining the fray, which is why protests are occurring in areas synonymous with students and younger demographics. Families are also getting involved, which is why some are in residential areas. It is evident that people from all different demographics support democracy.  

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Protesters defiant amid Hong Kong stand-off

Protesters defiant amid Hong Kong stand-off | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"Tensions escalated on Sunday when the broader Occupy Central protest movement threw its weight behind student-led protests, bringing forward a mass civil disobedience campaign due to start on Wednesday.  China's leaders must be sitting uncomfortably in Beijing.

As long as the protests continue, there is a chance they will spread to the mainland, where many are unhappy with one-party rule.  But if the protesters hold their ground, how far will Beijing allow events to spiral before getting directly involved?"


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Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, October 6, 2014 5:42 AM

Protesters defiant amid Hong Kong stand-off

Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, October 6, 2014 3:36 PM

Seeing all of these protesters laying across the highway caught my interest.  These people are serious about what they want with their elections and it is not have their candidates picked out for them.  People are taking over roads, shopping malls, schools, whereever they can go to prove their point.  They know that the amount of police forces is not enough to stop them.  Although for the most part other countries are staying out of the business of China Britain is supporting the protests as long as they stay within the rules of protesting.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, October 6, 2014 3:42 PM

It will definitely be interesting to see how far this political protest goes and how far the Chinese Government will go to stop this. China in some ways is a victim of its own success, in the past China would have been able to simply throw its military might on the political dissidents and silence all opposition but how possible is that today? Now China is a global economic power and the Western World's view on China matters, not wanting to risk trade problems China is showing far more caution this time around. While China is reaping the rewards of its world position without doubt China is also missing some of the benefits of the Bamboo Curtain.

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China's territorial claims

One of the geography videos embedded in this interactive map: http://bit.ly/KDY6C2


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Kaitlin Young's curator insight, November 20, 2014 8:44 AM
The People's Republic of China is beginning to frighten its neighbors by flexing its growing power in regards to territorial claims. While China chose to keep to its self during the major periods of world colonialism, it is now considering the benefits of enlarging its borders. Since China is much larger with a more powerful economy and military than its neighbors, countries such as Malaysia and Indonesia risk a lot by fighting China's claims. Oil plays in the South China Sea are causing multiple countries to argue over territory. Whether or not China is willing to spark war within the region to claim natural resources crucial to its growth as a world power is yet to be seen.
Alec Castagno's curator insight, December 17, 2014 3:28 PM

China has a history of imperialism and expansion, and their recent economic gains show it may be considering taking steps in that direction again. The country is in border disputes in at least three different regions with seven countries or more. China appears very bold by claiming desire the control an area that is already disputed between five countries, and is much further away from China than it is the other countries.

John Nieuwendyk's curator insight, December 17, 2014 5:24 PM

China is imposing these territorial claims as it is a benefit for their economy. That being said this can cause geo-political tensions that can have detrimental effects on how one country trades with another. 

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In the East China Sea, a Far Bigger Test of Power Looms

In the East China Sea, a Far Bigger Test of Power Looms | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
In an era when the United States has been focused on new forms of conflict, the dangerous contest suddenly erupting in the East China Sea seems almost like a throwback to the Cold War.

Via Seth Dixon
Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks's insight:

China has been very aggressive in how they assert their territorial claims in both the South and East China Sea.  China is claiming control of the airspace of the East China Sea and the Senkaku Islands. While the U.S. government rejects this claim, they are encouraging commercial airlines to comply with China's request that all flight is this zone submit their flight plans to the Chinese government.  Japan, on the other hand, does not want the Chinese to have this as a symbolic victory that would further legitimize their political control over this space. 


1.Why does China care so much about some minor islands? 







2.Why would other countries not want to accept China's territorial assertions? 

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Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 9:29 PM

There will always be problems with every country. China needs to focus on their new issues and deal with them properly.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 9:38 PM

There will always be problems with every country. China needs to focus on their new issues and deal with them properly.

Alec Castagno's curator insight, December 17, 2014 5:35 PM

As China grows more aggressive in its territorial claims, Japan and South Korea are both adjusting their militaries to fit the situation. Both countries are expanding their military presence throughout the disputed region as they worry about China's expansion. The article states that China may be attempting to push American presence further away from their shores, and explains the increasing tensions between the two.

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Wedding, Gangnam Style: S. Korea attracts affluent Chinese

Wedding, Gangnam Style: S. Korea attracts affluent Chinese | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

South Korea's tourism ministry estimates that more than 2.5 million Chinese visitors spent an average of $2,150 per person in 2012, more than any other nationality. That's helping companies such as iWedding, which is the largest of the South Korean wedding planners hosting Chinese tourists, to flourish.

 

"Chinese look up to South Korea for its sophisticated urban culture, style and beauty," said Song Sung-uk, professor of South Korean pop culture studies at the Catholic University of Korea in Seoul. "Rather than visiting traditional palaces or shopping for antiques, they would rather go to Gangnam to experience state-of-the-art shopping malls."


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Al Picozzi's curator insight, November 17, 2013 1:28 PM

Seems that the Chiese are skipping over their ally to head to South Korea for a better time.  Seems that international isolation really does have an effect on the domestic life, and toursim, in North Korea.  They really also want to just go shopping somewhere new and modern and see what just might be avaliable in their neighbor to the south.  Guess this time they won't be invading South Korea with an army, as in 1950, but with tourists.

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 23, 2014 1:23 PM

I found this article very interesting because it seems so elegant for this new bride to have pictures takend and she has this new place where her and her husband are going to be getting married and then the article talks about where the best place is to go when these celebrations are happening. US Today talks about how it is not an elegant hillside or an ancient monument or even ruins that the newlyweds swarm to but the tony Seoul district made globally famous by South Korean rapper PSY's "Gangnam Style." "Helping shape that image is the popularity of South Korean cosmetics and fashion and the many South Korean stars whose looks are widely copied in China."

Jared Medeiros's curator insight, April 22, 7:22 PM

I am amazed that the Chinese look up to anyone about anything.  They always seem to think that they reign supreme in just about everything and that they are the center of the universe.  To hear people say that they look up to South Korea for fasion and beauty is astounding.  China has the best of both worlds when it comes to history and modernity, and there are so many vibrant up and coming areas of China that it is shocking to see them look up to another country.

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Beijing's Pollution

Beijing's Pollution | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

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Jacob Crowell's curator insight, November 24, 2014 2:21 PM

Great picture to show the two sectors of China's society. In Beijing we see the combination of industry and post industrialized. 

Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, November 24, 2014 11:40 PM

This picture taken by a photographer with the perfect lighting is brilliant....that is, if you're into deceiving people that the pollution from these power plants stays away from the higher class businesses and residences.  Looking at this picture you see the smoke coming from the power plant in China far in the distance creating a yellowish hue that could be thought to be from the sun.  Then closer in the scene we see what appears to be businesses and potentially some peoples homes.  This area is in a totally different color from the yellow we see to be associated with the pollution from the power plant.  Here we see a blue, commonly associated with clean water, covering the entirety of this area.  With the difference in colors these places seem to be as different as possible from each other.  In reality though, smog doesn't just stay in one area of the city where it is produced, but spreads throughout the entirety of a city.  There are no restraints on where the pollution can and can't be, it is free flowing into communities where people work and live.  If you're trying to sell a house here this picture wouldn't be a bad idea to use, although most natives aren't oblivious to what is really going on.

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, December 15, 2014 8:00 PM

This picture is interesting to say the least, it depicts two different cities, even though it is the same city. the picture does a good job at showing the major problem that pollution is causing to Beijing. While showing a smog surrounded city behind a clean, yet clouded looking city, drives this point of pollution home and raises the question is putting large factories and toxic fumes in the air, more important than the well being of your citizens?

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This little piggy is going to China

This little piggy is going to China | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

This photoblog will also link you to a full article and video that explains how the American pork industry is supplying China's demand for protein as globalization forces (among others) has led the Chinese consumers to eat 10% more meat than they did just 5 years ago.  WHat impact will this have on American agriculture?  How to we explain fo the rise in meat demand in China?    


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Adrian Bahan (MNPS)'s curator insight, March 7, 2013 8:28 PM

Read the linked article. How is China dealing with its increasing appitite for meat?

Paige McClatchy's curator insight, December 14, 2013 5:30 PM

Chinese farmers cannot keep with with Chinese demand from pork, so America is stepping in to fill the gap. The globalization of American pork seems like it would benefit American farmers and Chinese consumers, but the environmental cost of raising so many extra pigs on American land must be considered, as well as transportation costs to ship it to China.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 15, 2014 1:35 PM

We never focus on the goods leaving the United States and being imported to China. American pork is filling the demand in China and because globalization has made it cheap to ship exports, China is responding by eating more pork because it is affordable. This is important in keeping American exporting business afloat. There are plenty of pigs in the US to provide large numbers to foreign countries. I also find it interesting that what Americans would consider a staple of so called "Chinese food" is being exported from the US. 

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Where North Korea wants to Attack!

From the NY Times: "North Korea, which seemed to be running out of tubs to thump, found a new target for its ire in a propaganda video released Saturday on Uriminzokkiri, a government Web site.

To a soundtrack of fervent synthesizers and inspirational light rock, the video announces that North Korea will aim nuclear weapons (that it may, or may not, be able to launch) at Washington, D.C., Los Angeles, Honolulu and… Colorado Springs, Co.

The unorthodox move — apparently an attempt to target the North American Aerospace Defense Command, or Norad, and the United States Air Force Academy — is compounded by the fact that Pyongyang does not quite know where the city is. The map shown in the video places it somewhere in Louisiana."


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Louis Culotta's curator insight, April 22, 2013 3:13 PM

After watching this video it makes it really hard to believe any of this is possible at all to anyone in the world watching it, other than making the people of North Korea believe it to keep up moral in the contry itself.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 9:35 PM

We watched this video in class and its just absurd. North Korea has no idea what they are doing and what are they going to attack? Nuclear weapons are no joke but this video is pretty funny.

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 13, 2014 2:24 PM

North Korea uses propaganda videos in order to convince its citizens that they are in fact, the biggest and baddest. This video is supposed to show North Koreans that they should not fear the United States because they (might?) have nuclear missiles that can potentially reach American soil, specifically DC, Los Angeles, Hawaii, and Colorado Springs (though they depict Norad as being in Louisiana, not Colorado). North Korea's policies regarding outside media keep the people dependent on the government as a source of information. While the United States is quite sure that North Korea cannot in fact reach the United States, the idea is still unnerving. As military technologies develop, physical geography may no longer be a form of defense, 

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China's one-child policy creates massive gender imbalance

The Chinese government says its so-called "one-child policy" has succeeded in reining in its population. But more than three decades after the policy's imple...

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Christina Dadaian's comment, July 5, 2013 4:13 PM
They'll have to balance out eventually. Either that or have the entire population suffer. It may take time but I imagine that things will correct themselves before it's too late.
Brooklyn McKenzie's comment, August 2, 2013 12:14 PM
It's kind of sad. I hope that those four brothers will some day find the love of their life. It must be pretty sad to see happy couples when you're single. Maybe one day things will even out.
Shelby Porter's curator insight, September 21, 2013 5:28 PM

This video gives a summary of the extreme consequences the "one-child policy" China has set in place. There are so many more men than women now, many are left to be bachelors for life. Many Chinese women are moving into the city looking for a rich and powerful man, and they succeed because there men are eager to marry. The Chinese have always had a preference for male children over female children. Now that the difference in population in so high, the government has made it illegal for doctors to tell parents the sex of their child before birth. This is a great example of the different kinds of culture that exist on the other side of the world. 

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My escape from North Korea

"As a child growing up in North Korea, Hyeonseo Lee thought her country was 'the best on the planet.' It wasn't until the famine of the 90s that she began to to wonder. She escaped the country at 14, to begin a life in hiding, as a refugee in China. Hers is a harrowing, personal tale of survival and hope."


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윤지현's curator insight, November 6, 2014 6:59 PM

I have ever met a person who escaped from North Korea. Her story was like a very scary movie. If I become a teacher in the future, I will do my best to a student from North Korea.

서병기's curator insight, November 6, 2014 7:00 PM

Because of the tragedies of history, there are still scattered family both in South and North Korea. Please hope for the unification of the Korean Peninsula.

Julia Kang's curator insight, November 6, 2014 8:45 PM

So many North Koreans are suffering from poverty. They do not have any food and we should pay more attention to them. This video was quite interesting!