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AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO
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Fertility Rates in Gapminder

Fertility Rates in Gapminder | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"CATHOLIC Argentina, Mexico & Phillippines have more babies born per woman than MUSLIM Indonesia, Iran & Turkey."


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Mathijs Booden's comment, September 28, 2013 12:03 PM
Any mention of Gapminder gets an upvote from me. One of the best resources in and outside of the classroom, period.
jon inge's curator insight, October 11, 2013 2:20 PM

awesome site for development economics

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 2, 3:15 PM

When watching the video it was apparetnt that for Iran during the 1950-early1970's there was an increase in fertility and then decreased to almost 1.32% in 2010. These facts were very interseting to see and the way that we as historians/ georgraphers can predict the future with the past facts.

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The World Religions Tree

The World Religions Tree | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

Dynamic infographic on world religions (don't be intimidated by the page being in Russian... The graphic is not).


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Ryan Randomname's curator insight, January 16, 9:32 AM

Khanh Fleshman's insight: This relates to Key Issue #1 because it shows the origins of each religion. Also, it shows the various relationships between religions. 

 

Vinay Penmetsa: This shows how a lot of religions are interconnected, and even if people think two religions are completely different, they might have similar roots, just like languages.

 

Graham Shroyer's religion: This relates to key issue 1 because it shows where religions originated and how they are all connected, like judaism and christianity.

 

Zahida Ashroff's Insight: This is relevant to Key Issue # 1 because it identifies the origions and relationships of the major world religions of today. These religious branches clearly show the relationships between majorly and minorly practiced religions.


Rishi Suresh:  This shows how, similiar to languages, many religions come in families and have distinct connections between them. 

Marcelle Searles's curator insight, January 25, 1:42 AM

fascinating infographic on world religions.

Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 9:06 AM

The immense tree of world religions is presented as a graphic to tell connections of world religions and how far they've broken and changed.

The movement of ideas and people have helped caused these breaks in the religion by bringing ideas to new people, mixing with the present culture, and going further from the hearth of the religion.

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Habemus papam: There is a new pope

Habemus papam: There is a new pope | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
(3rd UPDATE) The new leader of the world's 1.2 billion Catholics is expected to deliver a speech in an hour

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Maricarmen Husson's comment, March 14, 2013 5:42 AM
I'm so happy! The first Argentine Pope!
Al Picozzi's curator insight, July 10, 2013 12:44 PM

As a Catholic I see the need for tradition in culture.  Even as culture changes, I think there is still a place for it even in today's modern, fluid culture.  Tradition gives us a base to build a culture.  Yes cultures do change, but they have to start somewhere and traditions are the place to start.  Question, where would you be without some of your traditions? what would you miss?  We all start somewhere, after I was married and had kids, we started our own family traditions, but alot of them are based on older traditions,like a huge dinner at Christmas....mmm 5 courses and an expanding wasitline :).

Al Picozzi's comment, July 10, 2013 12:46 PM
I agree, there still is a place for tradition even in modern culture. We need somewhere to start and traditions are a good place.
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Virtual tour of the Haga Sophia

Virtual tour of the Haga Sophia | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

This is one of the more impressive cultural landmarks in the world, and an architectural marvel.  Studying the cultural landscape reveals that multiple 'layers' are superimposed one upon another.  This phenomenon, known as sequent occupance, is most plainly manifested in this site.  The Haga Sophia has been both a Christian and Muslim holy site, depending which political empire has controlled the city of Istanbul.       


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Brett Sinica's curator insight, October 29, 2013 1:26 PM

Turkey is a very unique country.  The land is spread among Europe, as well as Asia and the Middle East.  Its people are among many religions such as Christian and Muslim, and they speak various languages which show how diverse the region is.  Turkey acts almost like a bridge between the two continents and within its borders lie attributes that are hard to find anywhere else on earth.  What is strange about this specific site being the Haga Sophia is that it has been both a Christian and Muslim landmark.  In many other areas of the world, each religion holds authority to their respective traditions and structures.  Though the holy site in Istanbul shows how truely diverse the nation is and has been for its people and especially religions.

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Religious Geographies

Religious Geographies | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

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Jacob Ramsey's comment, September 1, 2013 7:42 PM
Its really interesting how a so many people can collaborate on one topic to bring not only the history of a ideal, but the true history of a long line of people that were a big part of the development of the west in the United States. We always learn about how this and that president did something to help the country expand but it would very interesting to see how we as a country grew from the influences of someone outside of our own society. And not only does this book offer maps but it also includes charts and timelines!
Kendall Belleville's comment, September 2, 2013 2:11 PM
It is really cool to see how much of tho religions are in the United States. it is really nice to see that people are being supportive of them. It is interesting that there are large areas of religion and then some areas have very little.
Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 28, 9:30 PM

This map conveys the population of Mormons in each state. The sizes of the states are presented as corresponding the the Mormon population in each. The map links to more than what it shows. When you ask why are so many Mormons in Utah you can look into the past of Utah and the past of Mormons and you will find that Mormons settled in Utah following one of their leaders. You can then even ask the question why are Mormons still migrating to Utah or the question why did they stay there. Human geography can help us find the answers to these questions. A shared ideology among the community. A lack of repercussion for being open about their belief. A sense of belonging. Family connections. Human Geography help us unravel these mysteries which were brought to our attention by a simple map.

Regional spaces of Mormon's (such as the rather Formal region of Utah) are shown through the map and show the distribution of Mormonism throughout the world.

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Happy Easter!

Happy Easter! | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 30, 2013 1:37 PM

This London Easter Egg/Globe is fantastic.  To those that celebrate it, Happy Easter! 

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U.S. Religion Map and Religious Populations

U.S. Religion Map and Religious Populations | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
The Pew U.S. Religious Landscape Study religion map diagrams which religions have the highest populations in each state.

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Travis Winger's curator insight, January 7, 7:14 PM

This shows how different cultures and religions have spread throughout America and how certain regions atract certain types of religion. This affects the areas culture and movement of people to certain areas.

Hye-Hyun Kang's curator insight, January 9, 9:13 PM

This shows how different religions have affected different states in the U.S. This affects certain areas in the states and their culture. 

Ryan Randomname's curator insight, January 16, 9:36 AM

Khanh Fleshman's insight: This relates to Key Issue #1 because it shows the distribution of religions on a national scale. It also  highlights the dominance of Christianity and Protestantism in the US.

 

Graham Shroyer's insight: This relates to key issue 1 because it shows the prevalence of christianity, a universalizing religion, in the US.

 

Vinay Penmetsa: This relates with the section, showing how Christianity is an universalizing religion, and its distribution in America.

 

Zahida Ashroff's Insight: This relates to Key Issue #1 because it shows the distribution and density of Protestants in the U.S. This map shows that the highest density of Protestants occur oin the South-Eastern region of the U.S.

 

Rishi Suresh: This relates to the distribution of denominations within America. It shows how the distribution is related to the patterns left by the original settlers.