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Damage from cancelled Canadian census as bad as feared

Damage from cancelled Canadian census as bad as feared | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
The cancellation of the mandatory long-form census has damaged research in key areas, from how immigrants are doing in the labour market to how the middle class is faring, while making it more difficult for cities to ensure taxpayer dollars are being spent wisely, planners and researchers say.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 2, 11:25 PM

Canada got rid of the mandatory census, and is discovering it can no longer know much about itself. 


Tag: Canada, populationcensus.

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Quebec Voters Say 'Non' to Separatists

Quebec Voters Say 'Non' to Separatists | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"Quebec voters gave a resounding no to the prospects of holding a third referendum on independence from Canada, handing the main separatist party in the French-speaking province one of its worst electoral defeats ever."  

 

Quebec, which is 80 percent French-speaking, has plenty of autonomy already. The province of 8.1 million sets its own income tax, has its own immigration policy favoring French speakers, and has legislation prioritizing French over English.  But many Quebecois have long dreamed of an independent Quebec, as they at times haven't felt respected and have worried about the survival of their language in English-speaking North America.

 

Tags: Canada, political, devolution.


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Alec Castagno's curator insight, September 23, 2014 11:14 AM

What started as an election focused on the Parti Quebecois "values", containing a questionable effort to outlaw Muslim head wear and other religious symbols, ended up turning to a matter of independence for province. Possibly riding on the coattails of the recent Scottish vote, the PQ ended up losing the election and their hold on the position of Premier. Quebec already enjoys a good amount of independence, and the election seems to show that for now its good enough for the people of Quebec. 

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 14, 2014 6:32 PM

The politics of Quebec are interesting to say the least. Originally founded by the French in the 17th century and then later conquered by the English in the late 18th century Canada is a nation with a mix if influences. While much of Canada today is something of a standard English colony Quebec has desperately hung on to it's French roots. In Quebec City their are laws ensuring that all store signs are in French, even making sure the font is large enough. In spite of their dogged interest in preserving their culture they've voted against spiting from the body of Canada repeatedly. This is largely because even the more die hard French Canadians know their small territory is unable to economically survive on its own.

Bob Beaven's curator insight, January 29, 2:57 PM

This article is interesting to me, due to the fact that part of my family is French Canadian.  I have always found it interesting how the Quebecois have tried to become their own country but could never quite pull it off.  In fact, I had a teacher in high school who was from the Canadian Mid-West and disliked French Canadians, however he said that although the French community is different from the rest of Canada, he believed that separation was not going to happen.  This article shows that the Parti Quebecois will, for the time being, have to regroup and "clean the salt from their wounds" from this defeat.  For now, it appears Quebec is not going anywhere.

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Crack Shack or Mansion?

Crack Shack or Mansion? | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Can you tell a Vancouver mansion from a crack shack?

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Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, November 20, 2013 4:31 PM


In this world any house can be held as a drug location. in the neighbor I live there was a house that broken into by the cops in which they found hundreds of pounds of drugs and none of the neighbors knew. We thought it was an abandoned home. a crack shack or mansion it is difficult to determine if it is or not.

Ryan G Soares's curator insight, December 3, 2013 10:58 AM

This I found to be very interesting. To me it was very sterotypical and much harder than I thought it would be. I figured it would be easy to depict a Mansion from a Crack Shack, but I guess I was wrong. Different areas different lifestyles.

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, January 25, 2014 9:55 AM

A fairly funny game that makes fun of the astronomical real estate prices in Vancouver, BC. I actually wasn't incredibly surprised as I've watched some HGTV. Since many of the shows are Canadian imports the extremely high priced homes in Vancouver and Toronto are often featured.

 

I guessed 10/16. The game should branch out to Toronto, we might've caught a glimpse of Rob Ford.

 

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Akimiski Island, Canada

Akimiski Island, Canada | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Scraped clean and weighted down for thousands of years by Pleistocene ice sheets, Akimiski Island in James Bay provides a case study of how Earth's land surfaces evolve following glaciation.

 

Tags: remote sensing, geospatial,Canada.


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Nathan Chasse's curator insight, January 25, 2014 10:18 AM

This image tells the story of Akimiski Island's recovery after the last Ice Age, when it was covered with glaciers so large they sunk the island. The layered scarring on highlighted in the lower image was caused by waves as the island rebounded and rose along with the rising oceans as glaciers melted.

 

I wonder what forces are at work to raise the elevation of the island, possibly just decompression from the millions of pounds of pressure the island was under during the Ice Age.

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When it comes to geography, are we lost in the world?

When it comes to geography, are we lost in the world? | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Geography contributes to a sense of identity on a personal level and collectively as a nation. So what does it mean when we don’t know where Africa or Europe is on a map?

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 18, 2013 9:59 AM

This article by the chair of the Canadian Council for Geographic Education shows how the decline in student's geographic knowledge is linked to it's erosion within the curriculum.  In an era of globalization, geographic knowledge and spatial thinking becomes all the more essential. 


Tags: geography education, geo-inspiration.


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The 10 Stories You Missed in 2012

The 10 Stories You Missed in 2012 | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
2012 has had many stories around the globe have grabbed the headlines with their shocking tales.  Some of the most important shifts in the world however are incremental processes that happen slowly...

 

This article from Foreign Policy shares some great global stories that may end up impacting the coming years as well:  

 

1) India and Pakistan start trading more

2) Brazil becomes an immigration destination

3) Inuits strike it rich

4) A tropical disease nearly eradicated

5) The copyright wars go 3-D

6) The end of the Indian call center (Philippines)

7) Hong Kong fights back

8) Moscow on the Med (Cyprus)

9) Oil discoveries in Central Africa

10) Island dispute between Iran and UAE


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Kristen McDaniel's curator insight, January 4, 2013 9:57 AM

What was missed in the news?  Take a look at some of the stories from around the world!

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Why Canada needs a flood of immigrants

Why Canada needs a flood of immigrants | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"Between now and 2021, a million jobs are expected to go unfilled across Canada. Ottawa is making reforms to the immigration system but isn't going far enough. We need to radically boost immigration numbers. With the right people, Canada can be an innovative world power. Without them, we'll drain away our potential."  This article clearly articulates some of the economic ramifications of the later stages of the demographic transition and some of the difficulties that are associated with a declining internal population. 


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Kendra King's curator insight, January 28, 2:16 PM

The article makes a strong case for Canada to increase their immigrant quota. According to the article, by 2021 one million jobs will be vacant. Since the population of the country is only 34 million, simple math dictates that a lack of supply means the country needs to turn outward. Admittedly, a mass increase in people won’t solve the problem entirely. However, the article goes on to explain how “innovations” occur more when people of different backgrounds work together. Looking at the United States, many of our start-up companies have immigrants on the board of them. So, immigrants will do more than just fill the one million open jobs. All this means that no Canadian can really be angry at immigrants for “taking their jobs,” which one of the immigrants interviewed for this article (Keiron Tanner) said was his experience thus far. So in one way an economic justification is a good way to go because of the clear need that no one can really argue about.

However, an economics justification really needs to be implemented in a manner that continues to support the strength of the aforementioned argument. Even though more people are needed, the government is assigning immigrants temporary visas, thereby giving the impression that these people are just going to leave. Yet Mr. Tanner, the immigrant mentioned earlier, wanted to become a permanent resident. He said “he knew…this (Canada) is where I would be staying.” Yet, what happens if the Government doesn’t get back to him before his visa runs out? The article mentioned an increase in immigration workers would be need to help process all of this information. I am thinking that if there aren’t enough government workers to keep up with the increase in immigrants, some will just let their visas expire and stay illegally like some people in the United States. When this happens more economics arguments will be thrown around, but this time in a negative light because now the immigrants aren’t paying taxes. Furthermore, other arguments, like the legality of the workers, will be put into the mix as well.    

Another issue in framing the immigration problem solely on economics is that it underscores the human nature of this issue. People often do not adapt to change well. I imagine Canadians’ won’t either, especially given how proud they are of their heritage. I remember learning in French class years ago that they had their own committee called the Académie Française who review the language to get rid of words that aren’t French sounding enough. What happens with the language they guard when it is mixed with the language of their new immigrants? A business owner in Steinbach claimed he just hired workers who all spoke German, so his workers could just keep speaking German and language wouldn’t be an issue. Yet the langue could still mix as people try adopting to their new home. Their language won't be immune to change. I also wonder how citizens will react to the new comers when it comes to other values. Do all the teachers react empathetically to the students who did not want to take yoga for reasons related to culture like Mr. Klassen? Or were the students just lucky he gets the final say because he is the superintendent? All of these questions eluded to the point that conflicts will arise. I just hope it isn’t  pushed aside as a minor issue like this article does on numerous occasions or seen as a one way equation in which only the immigrants need to adjust (i.e. section on Mr. & Ms. Lima).  

Overall, keeping the American notion of immigration in mind while I follow this topic will be interesting. Canada doesn’t exactly have a border issue like we do. The country is smaller, their government reacts differently, and their values are different too. Still though some human psychology is just universal (i.e. difficulty with change). Immigration is therefore bound to affect Canadians' in a different manner, but just how differently is the question.

Kendra King's curator insight, January 28, 7:50 PM

The article makes a strong case for Canada to increase their immigrant quota. According to the article, by 2021 one million jobs will be vacant. Since the population of the country is only 34 million, simple math dictates that a lack of supply means the country needs to turn outward. Admittedly, a mass increase in people won’t solve the problem entirely. However, the article goes on to explain how “innovations” occur more when people of different backgrounds work together. Looking at the United States, many of our startup companies have immigrants on the board of them. So, immigrants will do more than just fill the one million open jobs. All this means that no Canadian can really be angry at immigrants for “taking their jobs,” which one of the immigrants interviewed for this article (Keiron Tanner) said was his experience thus far. So in one way an economic justification is a good way to go because of the clear need that no one can really argue about.

 

However, an economics justification really needs to be implemented in a manner that continues to support the strength of the aforementioned argument. Even though more people are needed, the government is assigning immigrants temporary visas, thereby giving the impression that these people are just going to leave. Yet Mr. Tanner, the immigrant mentioned earlier, wanted to become a permeant resident. He said “he knew…this (Canada) is where I would be staying.” Yet, what happens if the Government doesn’t get back to him before his visa runs out? The article mention an increase in immigration workers would be need to help process all of this information. I am thinking that if there aren’t enough government workers to keep up with the increase in immigrants, some will just let their visas expire and stay illegally like some people in the United States. When this happens more economics arguments will be thrown around, but this time in a negative light because now the immigrants aren’t paying taxes. Furthermore, other arguments, like the legality of the workers, will be put into the mix as well.    

 

Another issue in framing the immigration problem solely on economics is that it underscores the human nature of this issue. People often do not adapt to change well. I imagine Canadians’ won’t either, especially given how proud they are of their heritage. I remember learning in French class years ago that they had their own committee called the Académie Française who review the language to get rid of words that aren’t French sounding enough. What happens with the language they guard when it is mixed with the language of their new immigrants? A business owner in Steinbach claimed he just hired workers who all spoke German, so his workers could just keep speaking German and language wouldn’t be an issue. Yet the langue could still mix as people try adopting to their new home. I also wonder how citizens will react to the new comers when it comes to other values. Do all the teachers react empathetically to the students who did not want to take yoga for reasons related to culture like Mr. Klassen? Or were the students just lucky he gets the final say because he is the superintendent? All of these questions eluded to the point that conflicts will arise. I just hope it isn’t  pushed aside as a minor issue like this article does on numerous occasions or seen as a one way equation in which only the immigrants need to adjust (i.e. section on Mr. & Ms. Lima).  

 

Overall, keeping the American notion of immigration in mind while I follow this topic will be interesting. Canada doesn’t exactly have a border issue like we do. The country is smaller, their government reacts differently, and their values are different too. Still though some human phycology is just universal (i.e. difficulty with change). Immigration is therefore bound to affect Canadian’s in a different manner, but just how differently is the question? 

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Human Landscapes of Canada

Human Landscapes of Canada | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Canada is a massive country, yet it has one of the lowest population densities in the world. Despite this, Canadians have made a wide impact on their land, much of it visible from aerial and satellite photography. Hydroelectric facilities, roads, mines, farms, ports, resource exploration, logging, canals, cities, and towns have altered much of the landscape over the years.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 10, 4:39 PM

This is a great set of images showing the human impact on the environment, with a special nod to our neighbors for the north.  These images have an artistic beauty and I hope every geographer maintains a sense of wonder at the details and beauty of the Earth. 


TagsCanada, images, art, remote sensing, land use, landscape

Bharat Employment's curator insight, February 23, 1:02 AM
http://www.bharatemployment.com/
Vincent Lahondère's curator insight, March 8, 11:20 AM

Un vrai plaisir

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Bizarre Borders


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Alec Castagno's curator insight, October 5, 2014 8:45 PM

This video shows how political geography does not always match up perfectly with physical geography, showing how the "no-touching zone" between the US and Canada has led to several border irregularities. It's very interesting to see how a seemingly straight border on a map is actually an odd and irregular jagged line that defines the political boundary. 

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, January 29, 6:31 PM

Craziest thing I've ever seen!  The poor kids on Robert's Island that has to cross through Canada to go to school.  I think it's crazy that the borders were defined when they didn't even have a complete map.  Taking a guess obviously didn't work out.  It seems very difficult to define a border.  

WILBERT DE JESUS's curator insight, February 12, 6:39 PM

Sometimes borders between frendly neighbours like Canada and USA are less protected than borders between countries with conflicts.

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Toronto at Night

Toronto at Night | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 17, 2013 3:10 PM

Ironically, some land use patterns become more visible as the sun goes down.  There are some sharp borders in this image of Toronto that was taken by the Canadian astronaut, Chris Hadfield and it is a wonderful teaching image. 


Questions to ponder: Why is there such sharp divisions between the illuminated and obscure portions of the image?  What does this sharp division say about the land use patterns?  Would we see this pattern in the United States?  Why or why not?  What urban model(s) can help explain the spatial layout of Toronto? 


Tags: urban, planning, remote sensing, geospatial, Canada, models, unit 7 cities.

Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, April 17, 2013 3:45 PM

What urban model is this?

Demitre Athwal's curator insight, April 24, 2013 10:06 AM

The other city that never sleeps

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Recycling Awareness Campaign


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 31, 2013 1:18 PM

I've posted on this topic now, so regular readers will know that I love a good flashmob that changes our perception of public places.  This flashmob from Quebec makes me wonder, "if there were a bottle on the ground, would I pick it up and recycle it?"  I'd like to think that I would, but the numbers show that most people would just walk right on by.  For more of my favorite flashmobs in public places, see http://geographyeducation.org/whats-new/articles/place-and-flash-mobs/  

Trisha Klancar's curator insight, August 21, 2013 10:07 AM

I love this...We are in Quebec City..this is in Montreal but it is the same. Very little recycling is done...people in homes do it then in the news we hear how it sits outside and rots, rusts or is wasted as the recylcing plant can not handle the amount it receives.This fact causes people to be upset and then to junk what they have.

Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, December 17, 2013 5:50 PM

I have to confess that I probably wouldn't pick up a bottle in a public place because I would be worried with germs. I most definately would at work or somewhere I was fimilar with or had a sink available to wash my hands. I probably sound like a germ nut but you never know. I think when people are fimilar with an area or care about the appearance of a place they are more likely to pick it up. I did appreciate the cheers after the lady picked it up. 

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Impacts of the Demographic Transition

Impacts of the Demographic Transition | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
A look at how the notion of family is evolving in this country. 

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megan b clement's comment, December 16, 2013 12:35 AM
This article talks about how the new Canadian Family. How the traditional family used to have children and people were getting married. Now people not only do not necessarily get married, but they also may not even have children either. It just shows how times and the people are changing from the older and more traditional days.
Nathan Chasse's curator insight, January 25, 2014 10:35 AM

This infographic is showing a shift which has occured over the last several decades from larger, traditional families to smaller, multicultural, non-traditional families. This infographic concerns Canada, but the reduced birthrate is a problem for many developed countries in Europe as well. While the multi-cultural and same-sex families likely have no negative effects, the rise in lone parent families is problematic as single parents have an increased financial burden while raising children. The low birthrate, when lower than replacement level (2.0 per woman), will likely lead to a stalling economy to be outpaced by growing nations.

Paige Therien's curator insight, February 3, 2014 12:45 PM

How exactly will a shifting family demographic affect us?  We can only speculate.  This phenomenon happening in Canada is also happening in most developed like the United States and Japan.  The problem with analyzing specific demographics like this one, is that they are taken out of cultural (local and global) context.  There are many things that may be influencing the familial demographic shift.  More people are moving into cities, where life is busy, fast-paced, "anonymous", and space-limited.  Having kids does not seem very conducive in this setting.  Are we as humans actually creating issues for ourselves?  Are we creating different meanings for "family"?  Are we adapting to our ever-changing world?  This issue will prove to be a mix of all of these things.  ...Maybe there is even an unseen, unfelt ecological and physiological cue to stop procreating when there are too many within a population?  However people who do not want children, have to ask themselves "why?"  Is being selfish really worth removing humans that much further from the natural harmony of the world?

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The 10 Stories You Missed in 2012

The 10 Stories You Missed in 2012 | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
2012 has had many stories around the globe have grabbed the headlines with their shocking tales.  Some of the most important shifts in the world however are incremental processes that happen slowly...

 

This article from Foreign Policy shares some great global stories that may end up impacting the coming years as well:  

 

1) India and Pakistan start trading more

2) Brazil becomes an immigration destination

3) Inuits strike it rich

4) A tropical disease nearly eradicated

5) The copyright wars go 3-D

6) The end of the Indian call center (Philippines)

7) Hong Kong fights back

8) Moscow on the Med (Cyprus)

9) Oil discoveries in Central Africa

10) Island dispute between Iran and UAE


Via Seth Dixon
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Kristen McDaniel's curator insight, January 4, 2013 9:57 AM

What was missed in the news?  Take a look at some of the stories from around the world!