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AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  TEXTBOOK: MIKE BUSARELLO
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The World's Largest Trees

"The world's second-largest known tree, the President, in Sequoia National Park is photographed by National Geographic magazine photographer Michael 'Nick' Nichols for the December 2012 issue."


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Hemant Galviya's curator insight, April 16, 11:55 PM

hiiiiiiiiiiii

Miroslav Sopko's curator insight, April 18, 8:44 AM

Najväčšie stromy sveta.

Basant Kerketta's curator insight, April 21, 1:26 AM

Magnificent !!!

These kind must be saved.

Wish I could plant and replicate this size and height here in my home town.

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MOOC on Water

"Water is an essential theme in social studies, science, and geography. Whether teaching about natural or human systems, water is part of the story. This course, framed around California's Education and the Environment Initiative (EEI), focuses on ocean and freshwater topics and strategies for teaching environmental topics in Grades 4-8. Resources and support are provided for how to use EEI to implement Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts and Literacy."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 6, 2013 5:27 AM

This new MOOC on water resources in California is project supported by National Geographic Education and Annenberg Learner.  This is a course is designed to span the disciplines and create an awareness in students about environmental issues that impact them. 


Tags: consumptionCalifornia, water, environment, resources, environment depend.

Top Free Classes's curator insight, September 9, 2013 9:45 PM

Starts in October.

Ana Cristina Gil's curator insight, October 12, 2013 3:53 PM

I find this video very informative because I didn’t know, that they have this type of course. I feel this course should be teach in every classroom around the United States, because is not only the adult that needs to learn how to protect the environment. We also need to educate our children because they are the future of America.  I think that by taking this class people will learn which places have the more environmental problem, and by becoming more aware of the issue , we all together will find the solution.

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Mapping Your Trips

Mapping Your Trips | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  TEXTBOOK: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"The following pictures are all embedded in this ArcGIS Online map that I created as a part of the T3G institute in Redlands CA on the ESRI campus."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 19, 2013 11:33 PM

For me exploring the neighborhoods of Redlands was incredibly nostalgic since it reminds me so much of the part of Burbank that I grew up in, but haven’t had much opportunity to visit since.  I left  Burbank, CA when I 11 and the next year the city’s landscapes became the set for the TV show “The Wonder Years.”  I was 12 just like Kevin Arnold was, and despite a serious lack of Winnie Cooper in my youth, the show still resonates with me as does the Southern California landscape.

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California Declares War on Suburbia

California Declares War on Suburbia | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  TEXTBOOK: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
In The Wall Street Journal, Wendell Cox writes that government planners intend to herd millions of new state residents into densely packed urban corridors. It won't save the planet but will make traffic even worse.

 

This is a article/video against many of the regulations that embody the 'Smart Growth' movement that would serve as a good ideological counterweight to many of the other sources that are available.  Would more dense neighborhoods create transit problems?


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Successful Implosion of South Bay Power Plant on Saturday morning

Successful Implosion of South Bay Power Plant on Saturday morning | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  TEXTBOOK: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
The South Bay Power Plant was imploded Saturday Feb 2, 2013
to clear the way for development along Chula Vista's bayfront.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 3, 2013 11:49 AM

This powerplant was demolished primarily because of location (watch the cool videos of the implosion).  The electrical powerplant provided energy for the region, but it's location right on the San Diego Bay doesn't line up with current land uses.  When the area's economy was focused more on manufacturing, this was seen an ideal way to use the wetlands on the bay.  Today our city planning priorites has shifted.  First, how we view wetlands has changed and we no longer see them as "wasted" space.  Second, an attractive waterfront that can be used to generate tourism is seen as a greater economic priority today than it was 50 years ago.  

 

Tags: location, planning, economic, space, industry, California


Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, November 20, 2013 12:59 PM

 


It seems that getting rid of this power plant was a great step for the city of San Diego. This plant was doing no good for them because it was taking space that could have been used to attract people from all over the world they could have added a many stores and other cool things that would create hundreds of jobs for local people who are struggling to make ends meet. The explosions were cool it was amazing how they feel in a line back to back. The explosion was a success for the city of San Diego. With all this new space available more people are going to invest in the city in which it will become much more popular than what it is now. 

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Boontling: A Lost American Language

Boontling: A Lost American Language | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  TEXTBOOK: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Watch the video Boontling: A Lost American Language on Yahoo! Screen

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 12, 2013 1:53 PM

In Booneville, CA, local residents literally created their own language over 150 years ago and had it was locally accepted enough to be taught within the school district.  This language of Boontling (Boont Lingo) but one that the younger generation has not fully adopted, but is still spoken by the older residents. 


Tags: folk culture, language, culture, rural, unit 3 culture, California.

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NOAA Environmental Visualization Laboratory - Santa Ana Winds Pummel Southern California

NOAA Environmental Visualization Laboratory - Santa Ana Winds Pummel Southern California | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  TEXTBOOK: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

The high winds that are funneled through the mountain passes of Southern California, commonly called the Santa Anas, were especially intense this last week.  These winds are even more frequent and intense during the La Niña fall and winters due to the dry air that sits over the Southwest. This image uses the NOAA’s North America Model (from December 1, 2011 at 0600z) to visualize wind speed and direction. The lightest blue to white colors represent the strongest winds – up to 80 mph. The flow vectors show the direction the winds are blowing. The highest winds can be seen blowing in between the San Gabriel Mountains.


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The world's oldest living tree

The world's oldest living tree | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  TEXTBOOK: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
At 4,841 years old, this ancient bristlecone pine is the oldest known non-clonal organism on Earth. Located in the White Mountains of California, in Inyo National Forest, Methuselah's exact location is kept a close secret in order to protect it from the public. (An older specimen named Prometheus, which was about 4,900 years old, was cut down by a researcher in 1964 with the U.S. Forest Service's permission.) Today you can visit the grove where Methuselah hides, but you'll have to guess at which tree it is. Could this one be it?

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 31, 11:44 AM

I freely admit that I have a strange fascination with the twists and turns in a majestic tree; I find that they are great reminders of the wonders and beauty to be found on Earth. 


Tags: biogeography, environmentecology, historical, California.

Beatrice Do's curator insight, January 31, 12:40 PM

the exact location is kept a close secret O_O

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, February 5, 4:17 PM

After reading this article, I am pleased to know that the world oldest non-clonal organism is located in California. It is amazing that a tree could still stand after almost 5,000 years. Hopefully, people do not destroy this tree, as it is fascinating. 

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Out of nowhere: U football player comes from dusty California outpost

Out of nowhere: U football player comes from dusty California outpost | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  TEXTBOOK: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

Cedric Thompson retraced some of the steps that led him from L.A. to a dusty California outpost to, finally, the Gophers football team.


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Courtney Burns's curator insight, September 19, 2013 2:20 PM

It is amazing how much the location of where you live can influence your life. Thompson traveled all over the place and each place had a huge impact on his life. His whole life could have been different if he had lived elsewhere. For example if he stayed in L.A who knows if he would have ended up getting involved in gangs or even been killed like some of his family members. Then again if he hadn't lived in Bombay would he ever have found that motivation to work hard. He didn't think so. His area even had an impact on him being recruited, because not many people thought to recruit a kid from Bombay. The area you live in really can have a huge role in who you become. Fortunately Thompson was able to use his experience to change his life and even his families future for the better. Such an amazing story and it is all due to where a person lived. 

Shelby Porter's curator insight, September 26, 2013 6:13 AM

This is such an inspiring story, and it's crazy to think that everything he has become is due to where he grew up. If this man had not gone to Bombay Beach his life would be very different. He probably would have gotten involved with gangs and never seen his full potential. Attending high school in such a remote area encouraged him to better his life so he could get out of there. Being bored all the time, he became a workout fiend and his father made him become a better student. Being from such a remote area also intrigued the Minnesota college scout. The choices Cedric made in his life as to where he would live, whether in Bombay Beach or the Minnesota college campus have drastically changed his life forever. 

megan b clement's comment, December 15, 2013 9:20 PM
Cedric wanted more for himself and his life. He commuted hours away from home in order to stay away from the gangs and violence that surrounded him back home. So he endured the long travel inorder to better his life. He also was an exceptional football player. He felt he had no choice and it pushed him even harder because he wanted an out from that life he had at home. He wanted better for him and his family.
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Yosemite’s Iconic El Capitan Mapped in High-Resolution 3D

Yosemite’s Iconic El Capitan Mapped in High-Resolution 3D | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  TEXTBOOK: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
New geologic map helps scientists understand ancient volcano’s roots and contemporary rock falls.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 13, 2013 5:06 AM

On a personal note, my very first globe and National Geographic magazines were given to me by my grandparents who noticed I had an affinity for all things geographic.  They lived just outside Yosemite Park and they made sure I explored it frequently while I was growing up so I have a soft spot for this particular national park.  My grandmother informed me that El Capitan was the largest single piece of granite on Earth and my skeptical 3rd grade mind replied, "Is that a fact or an opinion?"  Informal geographic education had a greater impact on my educational path than the formal K-12 curriculum.  Without those simple nudges, I doubt I would be a geographer today.  


Tags: Californiaphysical, geomorphology, erosion, landforms.

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Downtown LA: Always Changing

Downtown LA: Always Changing | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  TEXTBOOK: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"The Los Angeles of America’s imagination is rarely downtown Los Angeles. When we envision L.A., we think of the beach, 15 miles away, or the starred sidewalk of Hollywood, or the sprawling suburbs of the San Fernando Valley. While not the center of our Los Angeles, downtown Los Angeles is nonetheless visible —it is a backdrop to films and television shows set in L.A., and, just as frequently, serves as Any City, U.S.A., easily transformed into New York City, Washington, D.C., and the generic cities of car, cell phone, or drug store commercials."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 11, 2013 7:54 AM

This AAG annual meeting will be in Los Angeles this year, and geographer Jennifer Mapes gives readers a virtual walking tour of downtown LA before thousands of geographers converge on the city.


Tags: Los Angeles, AAG, urban, landscape.

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California-Mexico Border: Dreams of a Transnational Metropolis

California-Mexico Border: Dreams of a Transnational Metropolis | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  TEXTBOOK: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"A basic truth about the cultural geography of the California border [is this]—two very different city-building traditions come crashing into each other at one of the most contentious international boundary lines on the planet. In this collision, in the shocking contrast of landscapes, lies one critical ingredient of the border’s place identity."


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Ann-Laure Liéval's curator insight, January 27, 2013 3:29 AM

Les territoires de la mondialisation: les frontières. Une frontière qui se ferme et pourtant, une urbanisation continue mais contrastée. 

Emma Lafleur's curator insight, February 7, 2013 2:45 PM

It is interesting to see how this border has transformed from a fence to a guideline and back over time. Researchers of these two cities can learn a lot about how the events of one country affect the other country, such as in the case of 9/11. This place is also a great place to study culture because it is here where researchers can study a melding of two cultures in action. Overall, this area gives great insight into how two bordering countries affect each other politically, economically, socially, and culturally.

Al Picozzi's curator insight, September 23, 2013 6:46 AM

Also have heard stories of Tijuana...you know what happens there stays there.  Much like the Kennedy's in the US, Tijuana got its initial fame and wealth from the alcohol trade when the US started prohibition in the 1920, albeit the Kennedy family did it illegally with bootlegging.  Interesting contrast of building styles and cutures.  The space on the map makes this area what it is.  Without San Diego, Tijuana wouldn't be the same and San Diego wouldn't be the same without Tijuana.  This area also shows a contrast with the Canadian border.  Little or no fences on that border, but here, there are two in some spots, an old onecand a new post 9/11 one.  Why here then are there fences?  Culture too different?  Is it for racial reasons?  Is it just the drug trade and cartels that are all over the area the reason?  Is it US drug policy that makes the fence necessary?  Is it the US policy on immigration that the the fence a necessity?  Is it the worse economic conditions in Mexico or the violence that is forcing the people to run across the border?  Lots of questions and right now it looks like nobody has any real answers.   

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Visualizing Seismic Waves

Movie showing ground motion of four earthquakes propagating across a high density seismic array in Long Beach, California. Data was recorded by NodalSeismic,...

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 21, 2012 6:56 AM

Seismic activity is to be expected in the Los Angeles region as the major hazard threat in the area.  This area has a great number of sensors which now allows us to visualize seismic waves better than ever before.  This video show 4 earthquakes (starting at 0:45, 2:20, 6:00, and 8:35).  For more information on the science behind this clip, read the adptly named blog, The Trembling Earth.


Tags: visualization, disasters, physical, Los Angeles.