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AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO
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Boston's unnatural shoreline

Boston's unnatural shoreline | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Today's 100-year storm surge could be tomorrow's high tide.

Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 5, 2013 3:05 PM

This set of maps and articles help to explain why sea level rise is such an issue for many major metropolitan areas.  In coastal cities with substantial economic development, much of the current coastal areas where once underwater until landfill projects filled in the bay.  During storm surges (or if and when sea levels rise) these will be the first places to flood.  


Tags: disasters, water, physical, Boston, weather and climate.

Charlotte Hoarau's curator insight, February 6, 2013 5:57 AM

Surging sea represented on an imagery background layer.

Color ramp should be graduated.

James Hobson's curator insight, September 10, 3:18 PM

Here's somehing to "Swett" over for those who live along the coast:

"Coastal cities are now living in what Brian Swett calls a “post-Sandy environment.” In this new reality, there is no more denying the specter of sea-level rise or punting on plans to prepare for it. And there is no more need to talk of climate change in abstract predictions and science-speak. We now know exactly what it could look like."

Keep in mind that as globalization expands, urbanizaion does as well, putting more and more people at this type of risk.

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Red Sox Radio Rivalry | Bostonography

Red Sox Radio Rivalry | Bostonography | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

A fun visualization about the geography of sports fans, specifically where can you get a radio signal for games for the Red Sox or Yankees games.  


Via Seth Dixon
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Brett Sinica's curator insight, September 27, 2013 12:16 PM

Now this is very interesting.  First of all I live along the coast of Eastern Connecticut, which essentially is a battleground between New York and Boston.  Sure there is Patriots and Jets/Giants, Celtics and Knicks, but nothing is comparable to the Red Sox and Yankees rivalry.  Fortunately my area is covered by the New York radio stations, as well as the Boston stations, but in an area where you're either "for them or for us" it's almost a judgement depending on which team you favor.  Growing up it was always fun to have half your friends root for the Red Sox, and half for the Yankees.  Yet as I've grown older I've realized it's much more geographical and territorial than I had ever thought.  Hands down, the best rivalry in American sports, and I'm lucky enough to be right in the middle of it.

James Hobson's curator insight, September 15, 9:15 AM

(North America topic 1)
This map of Red Sex vs. Yankees radio coverage caught my eye for 2 reasons. First, the general divide between radio broadcasts seems mostly identical to a map I've seen about fans by county and city. I wonder if the fans caused the coverage, OR if the coverage made the fans?? Hmm...

Also, I couldn't help but notice the uncannily-large Yankee coverage area posted right in the middle of Rhode Island. I'd think that Hartford would have a larger circle.

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Historic USGS Maps of New England & New York

Historic USGS Maps of New England & New York | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
This historical collection of USGS 15 minute topographic maps dates from the 1890s to the 1950s. Geographic coverage is complete for New Hampshire and nearly complete for the rest of New England.

 

This is a great warehouse of historical maps of New England.  The picture above what is today South Providence and Cranston, but in 1894 the area around the lakes was a part of the City of Cranston.  Why would the city of Cranston 'lose' territory?  When did this happen?  This is just one example of the questions in historical geography that this resource can inspire.


Via Seth Dixon
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