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AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO
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The Strategic Importance of the Caspian Sea

"Stratfor Eurasia Analyst Eugene Chausovsky examines the Caspian Sea's large energy reserves and its conflicting maritime boundaries."


Via Seth Dixon, LEONARDO WILD
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 21, 1:58 PM

After the collapse of the Soviet Union, the world's largest lake went from having just two countries on its shores to five. Dividing the maritime borders has been especially difficult since the Caspian Sea has rich energy reserves and this lake will remain a place of strategic interest for many regional powers.  This video has been added to my ESRI StoryMap that spatially organizes place-based videos for the geography classroom.    


Tags: borders, political, geopolitics, Central Asia, energy, resources, Kazakhstan, Azerbaijan, Iran, Russiaeconomic, water.

Dean Haakenson's curator insight, November 2, 10:02 AM

Again, thanks, Seth!

 

Edelin Espino's curator insight, December 15, 4:32 PM

The Caspian Sea is in between of five countries; Russia Azerbaijan, Turkmenistan, Iran, and Kazakhstan which are in conflicts because of the large energy reserves and the maritime boundaries. It has oil and natural gas and that is one of the biggest conflicts for them because they are five countries so they want to share the same amount or probably one country wants more than the other

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Azerbaijan Is Rich. Now It Wants to Be Famous.

Azerbaijan Is Rich. Now It Wants to Be Famous. | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Oil-rich, velvet-rope-poor Azerbaijan, a country about the size of South Carolina on the Caspian Sea, would very much like to be the world’s next party capital.

Via Seth Dixon
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Al Picozzi's curator insight, October 20, 2013 1:43 PM

Much like Dubai they are using their oil wealth to build a city on the ocean.  Also they share a border with Iran, which makes the US even more interested in the area.  They also as of late have supported the US against Russia in the Syria conflict.  This small, but oil rich and strategically located country is getting involved in geo-politics and want to make sure people know its on the map.  Long a part of the USSR it is establishing itself as a country in the world and on its way to make its own idenity.  They are also looking to lay a gas pipeline that will just increase their standing in the economy of the area and the world.  They still have thier issues, Russia could flex its muscle in the area and there is the the ongoing conflict with Armenia over Nagorno-Karabakh.  Going to be an interesting time in this part of the world.

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, October 19, 8:09 PM

Azerbaijian's plans on becoming the next Dubai are interesting.  They are playing on their oil resources to help them become wealthier and more independent.  It will be cool to see the blueprints come to life and if they were accomplish they goals.

Shanelle Zaino's curator insight, October 21, 6:43 PM

It is nice to see countries prospering after the fall of the soviet union however I do not feel this is an original idea. Oil rich individuals creating  man-made islands founded on wealth and consumption. I believe this is more of the same. There is even talk that the Caspian Sea is not this color (pictured above) more of a brown from all the oil drilling that has provided the wealth to these individuals.

 

It seems we often hear of this area with new islands being created and many skyscrapers being built but nothing of real substance. I believe with great wealth comes responsibilities and these countries are not being very "responsible". With the amount of income that is flooding in, they have the ability to help so many people . People in their own regions with basic needs. It is just sad that while they search to build the highest skyscrapers in the world, people would benefit more from generosity.

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Technology and Tradition Collide: From Gender Bias to Sex Selection

Technology and Tradition Collide:  From Gender Bias to Sex Selection | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"Every year, as a result of prenatal sex selection, 1.5 million girls around the world are missing at birth.  How do we know these girls are missing if they were never born? Under normal circumstances, about 102 to 107 male babies are born for every 100 female babies born. This is called the sex ratio at birth, or SRB."

 


Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 25, 2013 3:23 PM

How do local cultures create these demographic statistics?  How do these demographic statistics impact local cultures? 


Tags: gender, technologyfolk culture, statistics, China, population.