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AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  TEXTBOOK: MIKE BUSARELLO
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Highly concentrated population distribution

Highly concentrated population distribution | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  TEXTBOOK: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"Only 2% of Australia's population lives in the yellow area. "


Via Seth Dixon, Malmci@Spatialzone
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Ma. Caridad Benitez's curator insight, March 27, 9:01 AM

No hay cama Pa ' tanta Gente! 

Ms. Harrington's curator insight, March 30, 10:10 AM

What could explain the density of the white area? What is it about the yellow area that explains the lack of population?

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, April 13, 7:32 AM

While the rainfall map offers a lot of explanation for why Australia's population is concentrated in areas of significant rainfall, it is not a complete picture. There could be a number of other factors contributing to the clustered population of Australia. Northern Australia receives significant rainfall, but is sparsely populated so there must be other reasons. A map with more topography would help as it could show mountainous barriers which would hinder expansion or major rivers on which civilizations thrive. Similarly, a climatic map could reveal areas which are tropical and less conducive to large populations of a more temperate climate.

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Above Australia's Northern Territory

Above Australia's Northern Territory | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  TEXTBOOK: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Over half of Australia lies above the Tropic of Capricorn, but it is home to only five percent of the population. It is a frontier land with little infrastructure, populated by cattle barons, crocodile hunters and aboriginal tribes.

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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, September 17, 2013 9:36 PM

Remoteness and liveability

Geography Jordan & Danielle's curator insight, October 2, 2013 1:19 PM

This is a huge chunks of Australia but only a little amount of people live there.

Nick and Hayden's curator insight, October 2, 2013 1:21 PM

New territory in Australia!❤️❤️ 

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Pink Lakes

Pink Lakes | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  TEXTBOOK: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Photo by Jean Paul Ferrero/Ardea/Caters News (via Exposing the Truth   Lake Hillier is a pink-coloured lake on Middle Island in Western Australia. Middle island is the largest of the islands a...

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Marissa Roy's curator insight, December 11, 2013 10:56 AM

Lake Hillier in f Western Australia is one of the many you can find around the world. The pink color comes because of the high salinity composition. A particular algaes found in salt water then produce organic pigments with a reddish/pinkish coloration. It is mysterious and interesting, as we are not accustome to it.

megan b clement's curator insight, December 16, 2013 12:27 PM

This is a photo of a pink lake that really exists in Western Australia. The color of the lake is pink due to the high salinity composition and the lake is filled with algae that cause the water to turn a pink pigment. I never even heard of this before nor if i saw this picture think that this is one of many pink lakes that really exist.

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, April 14, 7:46 AM

These photos of Lake Hillier and the other pink lakes are very interesting. I had never heard of this particular geological/geographic event and the vivid pink water quite beautifully contrasts with the green forests and blue ocean. It is also surprising that the nature of this particular pink lake is still a mystery, probably because it has not been thoroughly tested. I imagine the reasons for its pink hue are similar to the other pink lakes around the world. It is unfortunate that in one of the photos, a road was built right through one of the pink lakes.

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Lurking in the Deep

Lurking in the Deep | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  TEXTBOOK: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Divers on Australia's Great Barrier Reef recently snapped rare pictures of a wobbegong, or carpet shark, swallowing a bamboo shark whole.

 

The diversity of life on this planet and the ecosystems which such creatures live in is something that continually leaves me in awe at the wonders of the natural world.


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Marissa Roy's curator insight, December 11, 2013 11:01 AM

Divers witnessed a Carpet Shark eating a bamboo shark whole! This was in the Great Barrier Reef which is home to so many diverse sea creatures. It is interesting that a shark would eat another shark, even if they were not the same type of shark.

Paige McClatchy's curator insight, December 14, 2013 6:12 PM

The Great Barrier Reef is a natural world wonder that needs to be protected. Even though it seems like Australia does a lot to protect its shores (a huge source of tourism) accidents, like the BP oil spill can happen, and even accidents far away can send shock waves to such a fragile ecosystem.

Cam E's curator insight, April 8, 1:18 PM

The Great Barrier Reef is one of the most biologically diverse regions in the world, and the ecosystem that exists there is extremely delicate, as well as extremely fantastic, as seen in this article.

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Island Biogeography

Part I, island biogeography in a World Regional context...click here to watch part II, why island biogeography matters in places that aren't on islands.  archived at: http://geographyeducation.org/2013/12/06/island-biogeography/


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Christian Allié's curator insight, December 7, 2013 8:17 AM

........""....

... Part I, island biogeography in a World Regional context..


....Part II, why island biogeography matters in places that aren't on islands.

Al Picozzi's curator insight, December 7, 2013 10:56 AM

I really could see the idea of island biogeography when looking at islands and the ocean and how they species could develop that way.  Until I saw this video I do not think I could have made that cross over to continents.  Now I do see it.  If we build something across an open plain it will effect how species roam the area.  I remeber seeing pictures of the Alaskan pipeline raised in certain area and could not until now figure out why.  Now I know it was done, at least partly for, environmental reasons. So animals could still travel under it in order to move about.  If not Alaska would have been cut in half and prevented the animals form moving across the pipeline.  So as nature effected the developement of species with the rising and falling of ocean levels and islands, human effect the developmentof species with roads, farms and cities to name just a few.

Maegan Connor's curator insight, December 8, 2013 11:35 AM

I find the island biogeography to be really awesome because it's as if the small South Pacific islands are a completely separate world in terms of the creatures that live in the isolated environments.  Growing up, the idea of the Komodo Dragon was terrifying and amazing because lizards are just supposed to be little, ugly reptiles and the existence of one large enough to eat us and named after the beasts in fairytales was fascinating.  In Rhode Island, there isn't much in terms of exotic wildlife but even the species throughtout the rest of the U.S. don't completely compare to the rare creatures on the islands that have adapted to the conditions of living on small pieces of land.

The land bridge is something I don't recall ever hearing of before and the way that it influences the animals' evolution and expansion is fascinating.  I think of it in terms of humans because when immigrants cross seas to go to different countries, they are forced to adapt and they're families evolve differently than they would have in their homeland. The land bridge provided similar challenges for the marsupials and reptiles that are/were located on the secluded islands.

Once again, I also find myself extremely annoyed with man's habit of killing off rare species for the selfish reasons of owning land and not being hunted by the animals whose land they've encroached upon.

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A new face of homelessness

A new face of homelessness | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  TEXTBOOK: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Families such as these are swelling the ranks of people forced to seek help from Australia's charities.

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Six-Legged Giant Finds Secret Hideaway, Hides For 80 Years

Six-Legged Giant Finds Secret Hideaway, Hides For 80 Years | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  TEXTBOOK: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
The insect is so large — as big as a human hand — it's been dubbed a "tree lobster." It was thought to be extinct, but some enterprising entomologists scoured a barren hunk of rock in the middle of the ocean and found surviving Lord Howe Island...

 

Island Biogeography is endlessly fascinating and provides some of the most striking species we have on Earth.  The physical habitat is fragmented and the genetic diversity is limited.  Within this context, species evolve to fill ecological niches within their particular locale.  This NPR article demonstrates the story of but one of these incredible species that never could have evolved on the continents.  In modern society, more extinctions are happening on islands than anywhere else as 'specialist' species are in greater competition with 'generalists.' 


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Meagan Harpin's curator insight, October 23, 2013 1:07 PM

Pictured above is what is left of a volcano called Ball's pyramid. It emerged from the ocean 7 million years ago and sits just off of Australia in the South Pacific. This rock also hides a secret, it is home to a six legged stick insect 12 centimeters long and the heaviest flightless stick insect in the world. If I had found those bugs I would not have been a happy camper!  

Cam E's curator insight, April 8, 1:20 PM

I wouldn't want to come across that in my bed at night! The Europeans called this thing the "Tree Lobster" in the past, and it seems to hold up. Is it possible that these critters exist only on this island? What movement in the past caused them to be isolated like this?

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, April 14, 8:01 AM

This article is an example of how the geographic isolation of islands provides allows for incredibly unique ecology. Additionally, it is an example of how globalization can have a damaging effect on these small islands. When rats were inadvertently introduced to Lord Howe Island in 1918, they wiped out the giant stick bug native to only that island, but somehow a small colony of the insect were still living on the small remnant of a volcanic island nearby. Rescued from extinction, ecologists must now find a way to reintroduce the insect into the wild, but will be met with resistance, not only from the rats, but from the people living on Lord Howe who understandably do not want a ton of gigantic insects climbing all over their homes.