AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO
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AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO
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Muslim Pilgrims Are Taking "Hajj Selfies" And Clerics Are Not Happy

Muslim Pilgrims Are Taking "Hajj Selfies" And Clerics Are Not Happy | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Clerics are reportedly condemning the latest "selfie fever" at Islam's holiest sites.

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Incredible photos show mountains of plastic bottles washed in Maldives

Incredible photos show mountains of plastic bottles washed in Maldives | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Award-winning filmmaker Alison Teal, 27, from Hawaii, visited Thilafushi – or Trash Island - an artificial island created as a municipal landfill situated to the west of Malé. 

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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, October 2, 2014 6:17 PM

Option topic:  Marine Environments and management 

dilaycock's curator insight, October 3, 2014 8:07 PM

Oh wow. Such a disjuncture between what we imagine and the reality. I'm in a school where many of the students are beach-goers and surfers. These images should make them angry and get them thinking (and hopefully, acting).

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Beautiful Physical Landscapes

"#TheRidge is the brand new film from Danny Macaskill... For the first time in one of his films Danny climbs aboard a mountain bike and returns to his native home of the Isle of Skye in Scotland to take on a death-defying ride along the notorious Cuillin Ridgeline."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 3, 2014 3:41 PM

I loved Danny Macaskill's earlier video in Scotland's cultural landscapes, and this extreme sports clip is infused with gorgeous physical landscapes.  


Tag: Scotland, sport, landscape.

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, October 6, 2014 5:37 AM

Beautiful Physical Landscapes

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, October 19, 2014 7:37 PM

Engage boys with Landforms and Landscapes - intro video!

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Evidence of climate change: 35,000 walrus gather on north-west Alaska.

Evidence of climate change: 35,000 walrus gather on north-west Alaska. | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

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Geography Soup

"A great resource full of great links to accompany the Geography Soup channel on Vimeo."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 3, 2014 7:19 PM

Geography Soup is a Vimeo channel designed to include interesting videos that are laden with geographic content in them.  This powerpoint slideshow has resources designed to help you get the most flavor and substance out of these (and any other) video resources.  This is especially great for K-12 students, physical and regional geography.


Tags: K12, video.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, October 1, 2014 11:22 PM

Course resource

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Capital of Latin America

Capital of Latin America | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"I often ask students and audiences a quirky question: "What is the capital of Latin America?" Of course, it is a region of a couple dozen sovereign countries and the colonies of several empires, so there is no real capital. But if there were, I assert, it would be MIA: Miami International Airport. Specifically, the American Airlines hub at MIA is the nexus of most of the hemisphere, as illustrated in this 2002 route map."


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Rachel Phillips's curator insight, April 16, 2015 5:23 PM

Miami being the "capital of Latin America", is something that I never, at all would have ever thought of, because, well, it isn't really in Latin America. But, seeing this chart of the MIA really makes me think, and Miami being the "capital" now makes a lot of sense.  There are so many more flights from MIA connecting to places in Latin America than to other parts of the US, and even other parts of the world. It's a little crazy to think that this airport is the "hub" of Latin America.

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Fans in London dreaming of an NFL team of their own

Fans in London dreaming of an NFL team of their own | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
With three regular-season NFL games in London this year, American football fever is cresting across the Atlanic
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Why can’t we do it peacefully?

Why can’t we do it peacefully? | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
AFRICA embraces more than a thousand ethnic groups and languages lumped crudely together by colonial mapmakers. So it is surprising that bids for secession have...

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The myth of religious violence

The myth of religious violence | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
The popular belief that religion is the cause of the world’s bloodiest conflicts is central to our modern conviction that faith and politics should never mix. But, Karen Armstrong writes, the messy history of their separation suggests it was never so simple

 

After a bumpy beginning, secularism has undoubtedly been valuable to the west, but we would be wrong to regard it as a universal law. It emerged as a particular and unique feature of the historical process in Europe; it was an evolutionary adaptation to a very specific set of circumstances. In a different environment, modernity may well take other forms. Many secular thinkers now regard “religion” as inherently belligerent and intolerant, and an irrational, backward and violent “other” to the peaceable and humane liberal state – an attitude with an unfortunate echo of the colonialist view of indigenous peoples as hopelessly “primitive”, mired in their benighted religious beliefs. There are consequences to our failure to understand that our secularism, and its understanding of the role of religion, is exceptional. When secularisation has been applied by force, it has provoked a fundamentalist reaction – and history shows that fundamentalist movements which come under attack invariably grow even more extreme. The fruits of this error are on display across the Middle East: when we look with horror upon the travesty of Isis, we would be wise to acknowledge that its barbaric violence may be, at least in part, the offspring of policies guided by our disdain.

 

Tags: religion, culture, conflict, political, geopolitics.


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Edelin Espino's curator insight, December 5, 2014 12:13 PM

I would say that Religious Has nothing to do with war but there has been several religious problems in this world, so when it comes to war and religious I don't even know what to think, since God means peace no war. Religious is now separate from political issues, and this is perhaps a good idea but again, I don't know what to think about it.

Evan Margiotta's curator insight, March 19, 2015 5:12 PM

This is a very intelligent article about the problems of secularism in our modern world. "An attitude with an unfortunate echo of the colonialist view of indigenous peoples" has an incredibly sardonic feeling to it. Secularism has been a favorite mindset of Americans in recent years. This is a great mistake in my opinion. Religion is such an easy thing to stereotype and Americans have done just that. Unit 3 Culture

Molly McComb's curator insight, May 27, 2015 10:55 AM

This article talks about religious violence, but especially Jihad. ISIS is ripping through Syria and they are quoting the Quran everytime they behead or kill someone. Islam has been a huge influence in warfare since the beginning of time. 

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Integrating Geography and History

Integrating Geography and History | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

""This 18-stanza poem by Kit Salter, beautifully captures the importance of geographic thinking in any history/social studies curriculum.  This was shared by Dr. Vernon Domingo and the slides of his keynote address titled, Integrating Geography and History are available here."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 26, 2014 1:48 PM

It was my privilege to hear my good friend and fellow geo-evangelist, Dr. Vernon Domingo share ideas on the importance of integrating geographic analysis in historical inquiry.  He shared a fabulous poem by Kit Salter, one of the pioneers in the Network of Geographic Alliances.  I'll only share the first stanza here:


    How can there be a separate scene,
    For history without place
    How can there be events in time,
    For which there is no space?


Tags: geo-inspiration, geography educationspatial, historical.

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Sierra Leone widens Ebola quarantine

Sierra Leone widens Ebola quarantine | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"Sierra Leone's President Ernest Bai Koroma has widened a quarantine to include another one million people in an attempt to curb the spread of Ebola."


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Sahara Desert Formed 7 Million Years Ago, New Study Suggests - Sci-News.com

Sahara Desert Formed 7 Million Years Ago, New Study Suggests - Sci-News.com | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Sci-News.com Sahara Desert Formed 7 Million Years Ago, New Study Suggests Sci-News.com A series of climate simulations, co-led by Dr Camille Contoux of the Bjerknes Center for Climate Research in Bergen, Norway, suggests that the desertification of...

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Demographic Transition Model

Demographic Transition Model | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
A page to help you understand the Demographic Transition Model

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The Most Complex International Borders in the World

"In this video I look at some of the most complex international border. Of course, there are more complex borders in the world, but this video looks at some of my favourites."


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ELAdvocacy's curator insight, October 3, 2014 9:40 AM

There are so many reasons our immigrant students come to the United States.  Some stories are so complex and painful it can be extremely difficult for Americans to understand.

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, October 3, 2014 10:21 PM

Interesting!

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, October 6, 2014 5:39 AM

The Most Complex International Borders in the World

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Why Japanese consumers pay $14 for pork chops that cost you $6

Why Japanese consumers pay $14 for pork chops that cost you $6 | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

Japanese consumers love pork. They enjoy popular specialties like ginger pork, stir fried pork and sprouts, deep fried pork dumplings, and braised pork belly. The average Japanese householdeats more pork than any other meat—and almost as much pork as beef and chicken combined.

 

But Japanese shoppers also pay a hefty price to feed their taste for pork. According to Iowa State farm economist Dr. Dermot Hayes, Japanese supermarket prices for pork average about 2.5 times higher than prices for equivalent pork cuts in U.S. grocery stores. At this rate, a Japanese shopper buying thin-sliced pork loin to make rolled pork and vegetables would pay almost $14 per pound for pork that sells for $5.59 per pound in suburban Washington, D.C.

Why are Japanese pork chops so expensive? In significant part – because of trade barriers.

Because Japan imports almost half of the pork its citizens consume, trade restrictions play an especially significant role in the price of pork in Japan.

Japan’s “Gate Price” import system essentially requires that all pork imports—from high-end tenderloin to offal—meet a government-set reference price, and then imposes a 4.3 percent duty on top of that price. According to Iowa State’s Dr. Hayes, this system is equivalent to at least a 30 percent import duty on imported pork.

After adding standard wholesale and retail markups, this means that Japanese consumers pay prices for imported pork that are on average some 60 percent higher than without trade restrictions. And the Gate Price further inflates consumer prices on processed items like sausage by forcing Japanese pork processors to use expensive cuts, like pork loins.

Filling the rest of the market basket in Japan isn’t cheap either, as Japan has some of the world’s highest food prices. The average Japanese household spends 13.7 percent of its income on food, compared to 9.3 percent in the United Kingdom, and 6.3 percent in the United States. As with pork, Japan’s trade barriers contribute substantially to high consumer prices for other foods. Significant trade restrictions—including high duties (38.5 percent on beef and 40 percent on processed cheese), government-purchasing requirements for wheat and rice, highly restrictive quotas, and a variety of other border measures—substantially increase the prices that Japanese shoppers pay for their favorite foods.

In the Trans Pacific Partnership (TPP) trade negotiations, Japan is resisting calls by the United States and other TPP partners to phase out its extensive network of barriers to farm imports. It claims that—for Japan—foods like pork, beef, rice, and wheat are “sacred,” and is reportedly demanding hundreds of exemptions from the usual requirement that ambitious trade deals phase out virtually duties and other major trade restrictions.

Eliminating trade restrictions like Japan’s Gate Price system for pork would certainly be hard to swallow for Japan’s politically powerful but declining farm sector, which receives over half of its income from the Japanese government and benefits significantly from complex trade barriers that keep domestic prices high.

But farm reform is not exclusively a concession on Japan’s part. Indeed, Japan, as a whole, would be the biggest beneficiary of a transition to a more open and rational system of farm trade.

And Japan’s consumers would benefit significantly. It’s estimated, for example, that reducing the share that Japanese households spend on food from 13.7 percent to just 11 percent would save Japan’s shoppers an estimated $72 billion annually – or almost $1,400 per household.

And that would put a lot of ginger pork on Japanese tables.


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Hong Kong’s umbrella revolution

Hong Kong’s umbrella revolution | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
The story behind the Hong Kong pro-democracy protests

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Giselle Figueroa's curator insight, October 8, 2014 2:52 PM

What caught my attention was the name that this protest has ("umbrella revolution”). After investigating I could find why this protest has that name, the reason is  because the people who are protesting  used umbrellas to protect themselves from tear gas.The Occupy Central movement ( which is  a civil disobedience campaign initiated by Benny Tai Yiu-ting, Associate Professor of Law at the University of Hong Kong , and advocated by Occupy Central with Love and Peace) threatens to block financial and commercial center of Hong Kong if their demands are neglected: the resignation of the Chief Executive, Leung Chun-ying and the possibility of holding truly democratic elections in 2017. If none of the parties can agree I think there will be any solution for both parties and this will continue.

Edelin Espino's curator insight, October 10, 2014 2:56 PM

The umbrella revolution in Hong Kong is simply that Protestants are using all kind of tools to block the tear gas that the police are pulling them. Protests in Hong Kong are to change some of the rules that Beijing has also want Leung Chun-ying resign his position. The vast majority of the protesters are young and who began the protests were also young people who are fighting for the good of their city.

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Shocking NASA pics show Aral Sea basin now completely dry

Shocking NASA pics show Aral Sea basin now completely dry | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Once the fourth-biggest lake in the world, the eastern basin of the Aral Sea in central Asia is now completely dry. It is the result of a Soviet-era project to divert rivers for agriculture and a lack of rainfall at its source.

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François Arnal's curator insight, October 2, 2014 6:28 AM

Dans quelques temps la Mer d'Aral ne sera plus qu'un souvenir gravé dans les Atlas de géographie.

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Satellite photos show one of the world's largest lakes disappearing

Satellite photos show one of the world's largest lakes disappearing | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Once the world's fourth-largest lake, the Aral Sea in Central Asia has almost completely dried up
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Protesters defiant amid Hong Kong stand-off

Protesters defiant amid Hong Kong stand-off | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"Tensions escalated on Sunday when the broader Occupy Central protest movement threw its weight behind student-led protests, bringing forward a mass civil disobedience campaign due to start on Wednesday.  China's leaders must be sitting uncomfortably in Beijing.

As long as the protests continue, there is a chance they will spread to the mainland, where many are unhappy with one-party rule.  But if the protesters hold their ground, how far will Beijing allow events to spiral before getting directly involved?"


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Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, October 6, 2014 5:42 AM

Protesters defiant amid Hong Kong stand-off

Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, October 6, 2014 3:36 PM

Seeing all of these protesters laying across the highway caught my interest.  These people are serious about what they want with their elections and it is not have their candidates picked out for them.  People are taking over roads, shopping malls, schools, whereever they can go to prove their point.  They know that the amount of police forces is not enough to stop them.  Although for the most part other countries are staying out of the business of China Britain is supporting the protests as long as they stay within the rules of protesting.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, October 6, 2014 3:42 PM

It will definitely be interesting to see how far this political protest goes and how far the Chinese Government will go to stop this. China in some ways is a victim of its own success, in the past China would have been able to simply throw its military might on the political dissidents and silence all opposition but how possible is that today? Now China is a global economic power and the Western World's view on China matters, not wanting to risk trade problems China is showing far more caution this time around. While China is reaping the rewards of its world position without doubt China is also missing some of the benefits of the Bamboo Curtain.

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Ebola Battlers Can Learn From Venice's Response To Black Death

Ebola Battlers Can Learn From Venice's Response To Black Death | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
The city fathers didn't understand the plague they faced in the Middle Ages. Yet they improvised brilliantly. A new paper explains how their mindset is a model for how to face an unknown threat.
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13 things you need to know about the Ebola outbreak - Vox

13 things you need to know about the Ebola outbreak - Vox | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Vox 13 things you need to know about the Ebola outbreak Vox And it keeps spreading further: In July, a Liberian-American got on a plane bound for Nigeria, bringing the virus with him and spurring 20 cases and eight deaths in Africa's most populous...

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Geography Soup

"A great resource full of great links to accompany the Geography Soup channel on Vimeo."  


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 18, 2014 2:19 PM

Geography Soup is a Vimeo channel designed to include interesting videos that are laden with geographic content in them.  This powerpoint slideshow has resources designed to help you get the most flavor and substance out of these (and any other) video resources.   This is especially great for K-12 students, physical and regional geography.


Tags: K12, video.

Mrs. B's curator insight, September 28, 2014 10:41 AM

Awesome videos to rescoop from!

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Map - Who lives where in Europe? Nationalities across the continent mapped

Map - Who lives where in Europe? Nationalities across the continent mapped | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
People of many different countries are now living in Europe, with the continent's residents coming everywhere from Jamaica to Tuvalu

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21 Photos Of Nature Winning The Battle Against Civilization

21 Photos Of Nature Winning The Battle Against Civilization | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
As solid and unshakable as we think our civilization is, its grip on nature is tenuous at best. If any cracks appear in the faces of our buildings or our machines, nature is quick to move in and take over. With this in mind, here are 21 photos of places and things that nature is in the process of reclaiming.

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Anne Caspari's curator insight, September 24, 2014 1:22 PM

I love this. As soon as we turn around, nature is instantly regenerating.