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AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO
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The most popular baby names of the 2013, visualized

The most popular baby names of the 2013, visualized | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

Wondering what the most popular baby names of last year were? Ok, probably not. But now that I mention it, seems like some cool trivia, right?


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Two L.A. gang members are apparently fighting for Syria’s Assad

Two L.A. gang members are apparently fighting for Syria’s Assad | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
They identify themselves as Wino and Creeper in videos posted online but offer little indication of why they're in Syria.

 

Two Los Angeles gang members appear to have joined the flow of foreigners flocking to fight in Syria – in this instance, on the side of President Bashar al-Assad. In a video posted online, the two men boast that they are on the front lines and fire their guns in the direction of what they call "the enemigos."


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Feeding Nine Billion | Working Towards A World With Food

Feeding Nine Billion | Working Towards A World With Food | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

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Ann Marie Murnaghan's curator insight, March 7, 2014 2:45 PM

Really nice videos here!

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Crisis in the Crimea: The Showdown Between Ukraine and Russia

Crisis in the Crimea: The Showdown Between Ukraine and Russia | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 7, 2014 9:32 AM

This StoryMap from ESRI is a nice way to explore the current events in Crimea and this set of maps from National Geographic shows the historical geography of the region.   This issue has many inter-regional connections as well.  Many residents of former Soviet Republics are nervous seeing Russia's aggressive political strategy;  Moscow's previously similar foreign policy that aligned with Beijing's interests are now diverging

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Unit 1: How Capital Cities Distort Reality (Sense of Place)

Unit 1: How Capital Cities Distort Reality (Sense of Place) | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
What's lost when the only lens into a place is its major metropolis?

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Interactive map: Prevalence of baby names in the USA

Interactive map: Prevalence of baby names in the USA | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

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The New World

The New World | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
An interactive series of maps show possible new additions to the world’s list of independent nations.

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What Brings Americans to the ER?

What Brings Americans to the ER? | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Each region of the U.S. has the same four most common complains, just in a different order.
    
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Europe gas level high as prices rise

Europe gas level high as prices rise | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

Gas and oil prices have risen amid fears the Ukraine crisis could have a damaging effect on one of Europe's main energy supply routes.  But analysts say high European gas stocks will limit the turbulence.


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Jessica Rieman's curator insight, March 5, 2014 4:24 PM

There is a distinct fact that Gas travels into the Ukraine from Russia and Belarus and leaves for Europe. Where as the gas fields are towards the east and they dont venture toward Belarus but more towards Russia and Hungry and Crimea.Gas and oil prices have risen so that it can be distrubuted and taken care of that way where as the transportation costs money. Fears about the Ukraine crisis could have a huge effect on one of Europe's main energy supply routes. But the command will even out the chaos.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 2, 2014 5:50 PM

Gas prices are rising all over the world. The demand for gas is incredibly high as well since most people are driving their own vehicles to work and such. Cutting transportation down to traveling together and on public systems would help immensely with the gas rising problems.

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 17, 2014 10:21 PM

Russia provides about a quarter of Europe's gas, half of it through Ukraine. Gas and oil prices have risen amid fears the Ukraine crisis could have a damaging effect on one of Europe's main energy supply routes. But analysts say high European gas stocks will limit the turbulence. Gas futures climbed by up to 10% in early trading, while the benchmark price for oil rose by more than 2%. Traders are worried about the stability of supplies from Russia, which provides a quarter of Europe's natural gas, half of it through Ukraine. However, a relatively mild winter has reduced demand for heating fuel, with storage levels at the main gas hubs about 20% greater than last year. In Germany, Europe's biggest gas consumer and Russia's largest customer, stocks are at more than 60% of capacity, capable of satisfying 60 days of demand.

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The 20 year history of NAFTA

The 20 year history of NAFTA | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
In the 20 years since it entered into force, the North American Free Trade Agreement has been both lauded and attacked in the United States. But to properly assess NAFTA’s record, it is important to first be clear about what the agreement has actually done. Economically speaking, the answer is a lot.

 

NAFTA was the first comprehensive free-trade agreement to join developed and developing nations, and it achieved broader and deeper market openings than any trade agreement had before.

NAFTA did that by eliminating tariffs on all industrial goods, guaranteeing unrestricted agricultural trade between the United States and Mexico, opening up a broad range of service sectors, and instituting national treatment for cross-border service providers. It also set high standards of protection for patents, trademarks, copyrights, and trade secrets.

NAFTA ignited an explosion in cross-border economic activity. Today, Canada ranks as the United States’ largest single export market, and it sends 98 percent of its total energy exports to the United States, making Canada the United States’ largest supplier of energy products and services. Mexico is the United States’ second-largest single export market. Over the past two decades, a highly efficient and integrated supply chain has developed among the three North American economies.  Intraregional trade flows have increased by roughly 400 percent.

North Americans not only sell more things to one another; they also make more things together. About half of U.S. trade with Canada and Mexico takes place between related companies, and the resulting specialization has boosted productivity in all three economies. NAFTA has also caused cross-border investment to soar.

In spite of this impressive economic record, NAFTA has its critics. Most of those who attack it on economic grounds focus on Mexico, not Canada, and claim that the partnership is one-sided: that NAFTA is Mexico’s gain and America’s pain. But the economic data prove otherwise.


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Gary Yarus's curator insight, February 19, 2014 8:24 AM

A good review for those concerned about the Trans-Pacific Partnership.

Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, September 21, 2014 7:42 PM

It is interesting to see exactly what NAFTA has done for North America.  Making trade easier and free between the three countries helps all the economies included.  Free trade between each other means less costly goods.  Also resources can be used from different countries and manufactured in steps not all in one place.  All of the negative comments about it being a one sided deal between the United States and Mexico can be argued with numbers about how it is in fact not a one sided agreement and both countries are benefiting from NAFTA being put in place.

David Lizotte's curator insight, January 24, 3:55 PM

I found this to be an extremely interesting article. I'd say I have a basic comprehension of economics, so I am trying to expand my horizons and learn more about the topic. This article was clear, well-written/structured, and was a good read for someone not so experienced in Economics. 

I find the NAFTA agreement to be quite useful. The article did a good job at portraying many of the pros the agreement puts forth. It is clear that the three nations involved benefit. Throughout the article I was wondering if the agreement had been modified to accommodate todays new technology, trade goods, etc... The article then went and discussed this topic.The article did so through stating the importance in NAFTA branching out in other trade agreements, with nations in the Pacific as well as Nations in the EU. What's neat about this is how whether Mexico or Canada making the trade... all nations involved in the NAFTA agreement benefit. 

What I want to know however is where do these jobs, that this agreement creates are set geographically? I can only assume they are predominately in the South West (in regards to Mexico) and in the North/mid North West (in regards to Canada). Who are the people working these jobs? It seems like they'd be the immigrants themselves, not so much existing citizens. Does this create a problem amongst the masses? 

It seems as if NAFTA could benefit from expanding its trade market. This is something I am interested in reading more about and perhaps keeping up to date with. Side note... in regards to USA being able to buy capital in the countries "cross-border investment," and vis versa, I find it extremely useful and creative. 

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Crimea, the Tinderbox

Crimea, the Tinderbox | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
The West and Russia have a common interest: forestalling civil war in Ukraine.

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Allison Anthony's curator insight, March 2, 2014 3:57 PM

This is a great history of the region and a scary picture reminiscent of Hitler in 1938!

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Ukraine’s leader urges Putin to pull back troops

Ukraine’s leader urges Putin to pull back troops | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Ukraine's interim prime minister says the country is "on the brink of disaster."

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Linda Alexander's comment, March 3, 2014 9:29 AM
We've been asleep at the wheel while the genocide goes on in Syria and Russia blocks UN action. Well, this is the outcome...Putin acts as though no one will blink. Shameful.
Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, March 3, 2014 9:50 AM

That this could happen at all in this day and age just goes to show that the Cold War may be over but Russia is still flexing its muscles.  As a child of the 1980s, this turn of events frightens me.  I lived my childhood with the fear that there could be a nuclear war at any time always in the back of my mind.  Younger people just don’t understand what it was like living during the cold war and perhaps poo-poo it a bit too much.  But the threat was always there and it was something that was real and did not lesson until the fall of the Soviet Union.  The fact that this event has occurred just brings up the old fears and memories of the tensions between America and the USSR.  I hope that a solution can be found that doesn’t hurt the Ukrainian people.

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, March 5, 2014 4:41 PM

Crimea has been a region whee Russian traditions have been strong throughout the years and will continue t stay strong but if Putin is going to be the President who decides that he wants to isrupt part of Europe by putting the Ukraine and Russia against eachother on a battle field then there are going to be some drastic differences and not just in Crimea.

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Shanghai's Global Ascendance

Shanghai's Global Ascendance | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

Reuters photographer Carlos Barria recently spent time in Shanghai, China, the fastest-growing city in the world. A week ago, he took this amazing shot, recreating the same framing and perspective as a photograph taken in 1987, showing what a difference 26 years can make. The setting is Shanghai's financial district of Pudong, dominated by the Oriental Pearl Tower at left, and the new 125-story Shanghai Tower, China's tallest building and the world's second tallest skyscraper, at 632 meters (2,073 ft) high, scheduled to finish by the end of 2014. Shanghai, the largest city by population in the world, has been growing at a rate of about 10 percent a year the past 20 years, and now is home to 23.5 million people -- nearly double what it was back in 1987. This entry is focused on this single photo pairing, with several ways to compare the two.


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Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 15, 2014 12:38 PM

It is amazing how quick a city can change in only 26 years. Since this picture was taken in 1987, the city's population has doubled, and is continuing to grow rapidly. Today, this city is one of the largest in the world and has magnificent skyscrapers, one of which is the second tallest in the world. It is obvious globalization hit this mega city very quickly, making it one of the most impressive cities in the world. 

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 9:37 PM

Buildings, skyscrapers and urbanization. Why not? This is how the world is and this is what attacks tourists. For Shanghai, they need to be up to par with all the other business and tech savvy countries and cities. This is how they are going to keep their technological business, by building what needs to be built. 

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, September 11, 2014 2:16 PM

unit 7

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World's Most Dangerous Job - Human Planet - BBC - YouTube

“ On the Indonesian island of Java, men mine sulphur from inside Ljen Volcano. It's crater is filled with a mix of highly toxic gases, that have claimed the li...”


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Russia sanctions: Why the U.S. and Europe are not quite in step

Russia sanctions: Why the U.S. and Europe are not quite in step | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
The United States and Europe have reacted against Russia's military intervention in the Crimean peninsula last week with threats of economic punishments. But their positions are slightly different. Here's why.

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Russia's Invasion of Crimea Is So Shocking Because it's a Return to a Now Rare Form of Warfare

Russia's Invasion of Crimea Is So Shocking Because it's a Return to a Now Rare Form of Warfare | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

It seems like one reason why Russia’s actions in Crimea appear so jarring and brazen is that it’s a form of warfare that was once common but rarely take place anymore. Russia may not formally annex Crimea – it seems more likely that the territory will declare independence under heavy Russian influence – but it has essentially invaded another country to lob off a piece of territory that was, despite longstanding nationalist sentiment, an undisputed part of Ukraine.

 

Historically speaking, conflicts in which one country sends troops into the territory to take over a disputed region are pretty common. But today, interstate war is relatively rare, and interstate wars over control of territory even rarer. For the most part, conflicts today usually take place between armed groups within states, and when one country does send troops into another – the U.S. in Iraq and Afghanistan, for instance – it’s generally under the assumption that sooner or later they will pull out, leaving borders as they are.


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mapsdotcom's curator insight, March 3, 2014 11:55 AM

Is this dispute set to permanently alter borders?

Albert Jordan's curator insight, March 6, 2014 3:07 PM

If Rust Cohle of HBO's fantastic hit show "True Detective" is to be believed, then life is a flat circle and we are doomed to repeat our lives over and over again. Hopefully, for the optimist in us, this is not true or we may be looking at a return to an old school version of warfare as this article points out. We have seen a departure from this type of warfare because the only sovereign power necessarily strong enough to do it has been the United States. However, the U.S. is not in a position it once was. While still an undeniable super power, it has found itself strained economically and resource wise. Its international image has been damaged by long, drawn out conflicts in Iraq & Afghanistan. Not only that but the U.S. is not really a territory hungry nation. While the country may or may not use diplomatic, economic, and/or other covert/overt means to sway other countries to side with them so they can consume their resources, it is not grabbing up territory; depending on how you view U.S. military base placement. Which, Russia is obviouslly concerned with in Crimea.

The problem, though, is that there is only a certain amount of territory to control on the planet. Either you have it already or your neighbor does and when you need access to strategic waterways, landways, or natural resources you either must take what you want or need. Aside from taking by force or coercion, Russia does not have many other means to acquire what it wants - which is slightly terrifying as they still wield significant military might and not to mention, a large stockpile of nuclear weapons. Luckily for Russia, its neighbors and former Soviet Bloc members are not much of a match for them and are easy conquests should the former USSR decide to go back to a Cold War era stand off with the U.S. and its allies. Much of the world is not willing to go to armed conflict with their neighbors for territory as it will attract the attention of the world powers. The only feasible way it may seem for strong enough nations to expand their global borders is for an all out map changing war to break out. Which, unfortunately, would be a return to an old school style of warfare. Life is a flat circle, indeed.

Kevin Barker's curator insight, March 8, 2014 8:59 AM

When was the last time a country was invaded with the intent of acquiring a large piece of land? 

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OVERPOPULATED - BBC Documentary - YouTube

You REALLY have to check this out... http://www.live2excel.net Ground breaking BBC Documentary discussing overpopulation on the planet we call earth. overpop...
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Crimea: The Greatest Challenge to Geopolitics Since the Cold War

Crimea: The Greatest Challenge to Geopolitics Since the Cold War | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
The world never settled on the meaning of modern military intervention. As Russia confronts Ukraine, that definition hangs in the balance.
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Wheat Atlas - information about wheat all around the world

Wheat Atlas - information about wheat all around the world | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Wheat Atlas is an online portal to relevant information on wheat production,
markets and research.

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Putin's Playbook: The Strategy Behind Russia's Takeover of Crimea

Putin's Playbook: The Strategy Behind Russia's Takeover of Crimea | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
It seemed like a classic example of euphemistic bureaucrat-speak when, on Friday, U.S. officials referred to the deployment of Russian troops in Crimea as an "uncontested arrival" rather than an invasion.
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Russia's Seizure of Crimea Is Making Former Soviet States Nervous

Russia's Seizure of Crimea Is Making Former Soviet States Nervous | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

The crisis in Ukraine has countries formerly in Russia's orbit fearing Putin's next moves.


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Interactive Clock

Interactive Clock | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

Click here to edit the title


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Patty Ball's curator insight, March 2, 2014 4:27 PM

interactive digital/analog time

En Français - Alix Creuzé's curator insight, March 3, 2014 3:25 AM

On aimerait bien l'avoir en français !

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▶ Portugal's sensational ceramic tiles - YouTube

Mo Rocca travels to Buffalo, N.Y., home of America's 13th president Millard Fillmore, to take a closer look at one of the country's least-remembered commande...
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