AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO
6.7K views | +1 today
Follow
AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks
Scoop.it!

China's Growth Fuels Boom in World Shipping Traffic - National Geographic

China's Growth Fuels Boom in World Shipping Traffic - National Geographic | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
A new satellite study shows traffic on the world's oceans quadrupled over two decades, outpacing the growth in trade.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks
Scoop.it!

China's Wealthy Want Their Children Educated Abroad

China's Wealthy Want Their Children Educated Abroad | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
The U.K. is the top pick for high school students, and the U.S. is most popular for undergrad and graduate studies
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks
Scoop.it!

Why Americans Call Turkey 'Turkey'

Why Americans Call Turkey 'Turkey' | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Within the turkey lies the tangled history of the world.
OK, not quite. But not far off, either.
‘Turkey’ the bird is native to North America. But ‘turkey’ the word is a geographic mess—a tribute to the vagaries of colonial trade and conquest.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Life @ Work
Scoop.it!

Welcome to The Coldest Place Inhabited By Humans on Earth

Welcome to The Coldest Place Inhabited By Humans on Earth | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Pictures reveal how humans survive in the coldest places on earth. The images alone will make you cold!

Via Barb Jemmott
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Geosciences and Geo-Technologies
Scoop.it!

The Economist sur Twitter

The Economist sur Twitter | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
How big is Africa really? Much bigger than it looks on most maps http://econ.st/1vUvhmy pic.twitter.com/s14Te9FePM

Via Courtney Barrowman, Rich Schultz
more...
Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, November 20, 2014 2:37 PM

unit 1

Rich Schultz's curator insight, November 26, 2014 1:45 PM

Yes, Africa is much larger than the rest of the world realizes!

Scooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks
Scoop.it!

​PB & Thai? A spicy take on a lunch box classic

​PB  &  Thai? A spicy take on a lunch box classic | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
With a more adventurous palate, peanut butter lovers today are mixing it up with a classic spread
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks
Scoop.it!

​Art that's delicious: Roger Rowley's fruit plates

​Art that's delicious: Roger Rowley's fruit plates | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
An Idaho photographer documents the creative ways he get his kids to eat breakfast
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Africa, Uncolonized: A Detailed Look at an Alternate Continent

Africa, Uncolonized: A Detailed Look at an Alternate Continent | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
What if the Black Plague had killed off almost all Europeans? Then the Reconquista never happens. Spain and Portugal don't kickstart Europe's colonization of other continents. And this is what Africa might have looked like.

 

Tags: Africa, colonialism, borders, historical, map.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Bob Beaven's curator insight, March 26, 2015 2:26 PM

An interesting fact for a geographer/historian to look at is how different events happening in history can affect a map.  This is very fascinating, because Africa or should I say Alkebu-Lan has very strong looking kingdoms without the Influence of Europe.  Another interesting element of the map is how it is not Euro-centric, Africa is shown as the top of the world.  I guess in this history, Northern Europe instead of being a powerhouse of the world, would be classified as the dark region (like the Congo was in our own world).  It is also interesting how the map is not Euro-centric, but the fact to keep in mind there is the old saying, history is written by the winner.  In this case, the map of the world was drawn by the winning Europeans as well, and this map completely reverses that.  Another interesting fact, is that the Iberian is part of an Islamic Empire.  It looks, as if in this history, Portugal was overcome by the "Arabes" and Spain never even attempted to launch the Reconquista.  History and Geography, especially Political Geography are very closely linked with one another.  

Chris Costa's curator insight, October 27, 2015 5:00 PM

I found this particularly interesting to read about, as alternative histories fascinate me. The "what if" questions that historians always ask themselves are fun to examine and illustrate, as they are shown in the alternative map of Africa. It's interesting to see just how different this map- drawn from historical accounts of ethnic and linguistic differences between the various African societies- is from the map of Africa we now have today. European colonizers drew borders without any consideration for the native populace, and that is today reflected in the rigid borders of African states that do not match historical ethnic boundaries. The concept of a Europe unable to recover from the Black Death would have serious repercussions for world history. It would allow for the progression of African economies and polities unmolested by European influences and the slave trade, completely reshaping the course of the continent's history. The increased influence of the Arab world would also be a plausible consequence of the decimation of Europe's population. This is an interesting concept, and it is very informative in the sense that it forces us to consider a multitude of factors that played a role in shaping the world as we see and live it today.

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, October 30, 2015 7:04 AM

Alternative history is always fun. There is no question that Africa would be a different place today, if Europeans had never step foot on the shores of this great continent. Would the great African empires still be alive today? Would Africa be the dominant continent in world affairs? The history of civilization over the past 500 years would almost certainly be radically different. Instead of a Eurocentric world, we may have had an Afrocentric world. What this map really underscores, is the effect that colonialism had on Africa. The Africa we know today is a consequence of that era of European domination. While alternate history is fun, we must always remember the actual history that has occurred in Africa.

Scooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks
Scoop.it!

The undocumented immigrant population explained, in 7 maps

The undocumented immigrant population explained, in 7 maps | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
President Obama’s immigration announcement this week shed light on what has become a swelling national problem: the more than 11 million immigrants living, working and establishing families in the United States illegally.
more...
Rich Schultz's curator insight, November 26, 2014 1:42 PM

More than 11 million immigrants living, working and establishing families in the United States are currently illegal.

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Sustain Our Earth
Scoop.it!

One man took a picture of the Beijing sky every day and it is a horror movie.

One man took a picture of the Beijing sky every day and it is a horror movie. | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Ever have one of those days when your skyscraper disappears? (via Sina Weibo)With all the craziness Mother Nature has been unloading on Western New York recently, it might be easy to forget that Uncle

Via SustainOurEarth
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Navigate
Scoop.it!

Endangered and Emerging Languages on Viki

Endangered and Emerging Languages on Viki | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Over 3,500 of the world’s languages are likely to become extinct in the near future. Of the 200 languages on Viki, nearly 25% are classified as endangered.

Via Suvi Salo
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Global Affairs & Human Geography Digital Knowledge Source
Scoop.it!

Eat: The Story of Food

Eat: The Story of Food | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Take a tasty journey through history to discover how food shaped our world in Nat Geo’s Eat: The Story of Food.

Via Allison Anthony
more...
Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Rhode Island Geography Education Alliance
Scoop.it!

Thanksgiving Resources

Thanksgiving Resources | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"Thanksgiving has some fascinating spatial, historical and cultural components to it...here are some of my favorite teaching resources for Thanksgiving."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks
Scoop.it!

Take a Drone Tour Above a City Abandoned During Chernobyl

Take a Drone Tour Above a City Abandoned During Chernobyl | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
What happens to a city when all of its residents suddenly clear out?
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks
Scoop.it!

Could You Hand Draw a Map of Your Hometown?

Could You Hand Draw a Map of Your Hometown? | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
We all like to think we know our towns and cities pretty well. I, for example, can tell you every bar in my neighborhood and which ones are gross and which ones charge too much for beer. I could draw you a map of them, and label them nicely.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Development Economics
Scoop.it!

Vietnam borrows mn from ADB to upgrade tourism infrastructure

Vietnam borrows mn from ADB to upgrade tourism infrastructure | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Tourism development projects are an effective way of creating jobs, developing work skills and reducing poverty

Via Geoff Riley
more...
Geoff Riley's curator insight, November 26, 2014 3:34 AM

Good contextual example to use here of the potential significance of tourism as a growth and development catalyst.

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Geosciences and Geo-Technologies
Scoop.it!

Hilarious! When Brits Label America

Hilarious! When Brits Label America | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Sure, British types like to think they're smarter than us. But let's see how they stack up when it comes to labeling states (spoiler alert: they're really bad).

Via Rich Schultz
more...
Rich Schultz's curator insight, November 26, 2014 12:17 PM

Bet Americans wouldn't do much better when labeling geography around the world...in fact, Americans would probably do much worse!

Scooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks
Scoop.it!

60 Minutes Video - Nearly 30 years after the explosion, Bob Simon travels to Ukraine and discovers the reactor still has the power to kill

60 Minutes Video - Nearly 30 years after the explosion, Bob Simon travels to Ukraine and discovers the reactor still has the power to kill | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Nearly 30 years after the explosion, Bob Simon travels to Ukraine and discovers the reactor still has the power to kill.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks
Scoop.it!

The mother of Chinese food in America

The mother of Chinese food in America | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Mo Rocca meets Cecilia Chiang, the woman who is credited with introducing Americans to authentic Chinese cuisine.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Mistrust Threatens Delicate Balance at a Sacred Site in Jerusalem

Mistrust Threatens Delicate Balance at a Sacred Site in Jerusalem | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
A site in the Old City of Jerusalem, known to Jews as the Temple Mount and to Muslims as the Noble Sanctuary, has been a flash point since the advent of modern Zionism.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Bob Beaven's curator insight, March 19, 2015 3:29 PM

Landmarks can have powerful meanings to different groups of people.  The Dome of the Rock is a sacred site to Muslims across the world.  The Mosque has stood on the location for centuries, and it is said to be built on the site where Mohamed ascended to Heaven.  To Jews, however, this site represents where Solomon's Temple was located.  It was destroyed two times, once by the Babylonians and another time, after being rebuilt by the Roman Empire.  Today, all that remains of this sacred site is the Western Wall.  The Wall is a sacred location to many Jews as it represents their heritage and their nation.  Yet, as the article notes, many Muslims are threatened by the new Jewish interests in the site and they fear that it will be taken by the Israeli government and the Temple will be rebuilt a third time on the Temple Mount.  This shows how much emotion can exist over a piece of land.  The Jewish need to rebuild their temple right on the very spot it once stood, it cannot be built elsewhere, meanwhile some Muslims deny that the Temple ever stood there and there are others who believe that the site should be renamed to "Al Aqsa Mosque or the Noble Sanctuary".  This is one of the great arguments that I believe will never be solved, should the Temple be rebuilt at the expense of the Dome of the Rock?  

 

Molly McComb's curator insight, March 21, 2015 4:03 PM

Sacred sites in Jerusalem are having difficulties due to the differences in culture from the surrounding countries. 

Raychel Johnson's curator insight, March 22, 2015 12:19 AM

Summary: This article is simply over the Israel-Palestine conflict, and how it has evolved since its beginning. This mostly talks about how Palestine believes that if Israel gains control of Jerusalem, they will get rid of Dome of the Rock, an important place of worship for the Islams. 

 

Insight: I think this article accurately represents concepts of political power and territoriality well due to the fact that these two territories are having a very long dispute about this one piece of land. I think there is definitely a solution that should be relatively simple, but with the amount of meaning this location has to both places, and with the continues terrorism occurring, I don't know if a simple solution would work. 

Scooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks
Scoop.it!

For Thanksgiving, Our Favorite Photos of Feasts Around the World - National Geographic

For Thanksgiving, Our Favorite Photos of Feasts Around the World - National Geographic | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
We mined our archive for decades' worth of great pictures showing food, friends, and family.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY
Scoop.it!

Asian Border Disputes

Asian Border Disputes | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

Tags: borders, political, conflict, infographic, map.


Via Seth Dixon, FCHSAPGEO
more...
Asie(s)'s curator insight, November 23, 2014 10:23 PM

A good overview on the matter!

Kevin Barker's curator insight, November 25, 2014 8:20 AM

A great primer for discussions over border disputes.  In this modern geopolitical climate, some of these claims can seem aggressive to say the least.  The strategies/responses can also be very interesting when military options are put aside.

Jake Red Dorman's curator insight, November 25, 2014 12:36 PM

I was looking at the disputes between the Paracel Islands, the Spratly Islands, and the Scarborough Shoal. What I notices with all oft he disputes, the land being fought over is all claimed by China but the land location itself is all closer to the country china is disputing it over. For the Paracel Islands, China and Vietnam are in dispute especially after China put 2 oil rigs by their land. The other dispute between the Spratly Islands, China and the Philippines each claim entire ownership of the lands but Malaysia, Indonesia, and Brunei all claim some part of the islands as well. For the Scarborough Shoal, it is a lot closer to the Philippines than it is to China but China claims it as their own since they discovered the land. Now china has restricted access to the island following a standoff.    

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Development Economics
Scoop.it!

Copper mining in Zambia: the winners and losers

Copper mining in Zambia: the winners and losers | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Zambia is Africa's biggest copper producer but not everyone feels they benefit from the industry. All this week the BBC's Lucy Burton has been travelling around the country. Today she reports from the copper belt where she visited a mine and spoke to the boss and local residents about the impact of mining on the region.

Via Geoff Riley
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Cultural Geography
Scoop.it!

The fate of the Roma in Europe

Deciding the fate of the Roma population in Europe EU immigration ministers meet in Paris on Monday. Ministers from the European countries where the 'problem' originates were not invited, but can they be ignored? After the French crackdown on the Roma, is the EU facing deep divisions? Is it even legal for EU countries to expel other EU citizens?

http://www.romani-story.com

Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Wekiva AP Human Geography
Scoop.it!

Geography on the Job

Geography on the Job | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Explore professionals around the world with just one thing in common: geography. From doctors to shipping experts, teachers to traffic consultants, they all use geography in their jobs.

Via Kara Charboneau
more...
Rich Schultz's curator insight, November 26, 2014 1:44 PM

The use of geography in disciplines is much wider than you think!!