AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO
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AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO
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These City Maps Are Made Out of Razor Blades and Mirror Shards

These City Maps Are Made Out of Razor Blades and Mirror Shards | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Damien Hirst loves to play provocateur. The artist makes mosaics with pharmaceuticals and sculptures with taxidermy. Now, for his latest series of paintings, he's depicting cities in conflict.

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How geography affects animal evolution

How geography affects animal evolution | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
A new and potentially more revealing way of studying how animal evolution is affected by the geography of climate has been designed by researchers at The University of Nottingham and Harvard University.

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Maricarmen Husson's curator insight, November 30, 2014 8:50 AM

CÓMO LA GEOGRAFÍA Y EL CLIMA AFECTAN LA EVOLUCIÓN ANIMAL

 

La mayor extensión de hábitat climáticamente extremas sugiere un mayor potencial de reducción de la dispersión de los lagartos y aislamiento por el ambiente a lo largo de gradientes altitudinales tropicales en La Española. Por el contrario, climáticamente hábitat extremo es más raro en Cuba así un mayor flujo de genes a través de elevaciones puede limitar el papel de los procesos interespecíficos en esta isla.

Raven Blair's curator insight, January 12, 2015 9:38 AM

Geography affects the evolution of animals, which is, in a way, the development of the animals. The study of their evolution, conducted by a team from Nottingham and Harvard has shown that there are certain traits connecting the environment to an animal's body type. When looking at the different islands of Cuba, it is easy to differentiate the patterns of the animals.  

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Interview with a Geographer

Interview with a Geographer | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
In this interview with a geographer, Emily White tells us it's more than state capitals and shares how math can help kids and parents map and explore the world.

Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 21, 2014 10:08 AM

There are plenty of reasons why it is great to be a geographer--a geographer is often a great member of an interdisciplinary research team. 

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Why are the Mint countries special?

Why are the Mint countries special? | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

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Edelin Espino's curator insight, December 13, 2014 2:45 PM

The next generation will come with more country's developments and those could be the MINT countries which are, Mexico, Indonesia, Nigeria and Turkey, their economy are increasing and are far more bigger than what it was in the 2003. That would be awesome to see all those countries with a developed economy. That will improve the lives of millions and specially Mexicans! Can't wait to see how it will turn out.

Bob Beaven's curator insight, February 5, 2015 2:05 PM

Mexico, along with the other countries in the MINT category, are developing countries that could one day become economic powerhouses.  Mexico, as noted in the article, is in a strong position to become an economic powerhouse, due to the fact that it is in between the United States and the developing countries to its south.  Mexico does face a battle however, as the country has been dominated by corruption for decades, yet the new president, who is young and energetic, is attempting to reform the system and put an end to the wide spread problem.  If Mexico can become a major economic powerhouse, it along with Canada and the United States, could from a strong North American Trio, originally envisioned when the NAFTA was signed into law, back in the 1990s. 

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, March 1, 2015 10:00 PM

The MINT countries aren't that surprising.  After China purchased some of the US debt, it really opened my eyes to who the new powerhouse is.  Mexico could certainly be another powerful country if they could get their act together.  It will be interesting to see the shifts taking place in the next 20 years.  

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This brilliant illustration shows how much public space we've surrendered to cars

How lopsided the the proportions of an urban street corner really are.

 

Most roads in the US are built for cars, not for pedestrians. Whether we're happy or unhappy with this, most of us are aware of it.

But this brilliant illustration, made by Swedish artist Karl Jilg and commissioned by the Swedish Road Administration, shows just how extreme the situation truly is — even in an urban business district that's designed with pedestrians in mind. 

 

Tags: urban, transportation, planning, art.


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What Is a "State"?

What Is a "State"? | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Global Policy Forum is a policy watchdog that follows the work of the United Nations. We promote accountability and citizen participation in decisions on peace and security, social justice and international law.

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Take a Drone Tour Above a City Abandoned During Chernobyl

Take a Drone Tour Above a City Abandoned During Chernobyl | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
What happens to a city when all of its residents suddenly clear out?
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Could You Hand Draw a Map of Your Hometown?

Could You Hand Draw a Map of Your Hometown? | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
We all like to think we know our towns and cities pretty well. I, for example, can tell you every bar in my neighborhood and which ones are gross and which ones charge too much for beer. I could draw you a map of them, and label them nicely.
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Vietnam borrows mn from ADB to upgrade tourism infrastructure

Vietnam borrows mn from ADB to upgrade tourism infrastructure | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Tourism development projects are an effective way of creating jobs, developing work skills and reducing poverty

Via Geoff Riley
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Geoff Riley's curator insight, November 26, 2014 3:34 AM

Good contextual example to use here of the potential significance of tourism as a growth and development catalyst.

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Hilarious! When Brits Label America

Hilarious! When Brits Label America | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Sure, British types like to think they're smarter than us. But let's see how they stack up when it comes to labeling states (spoiler alert: they're really bad).

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Rich Schultz's curator insight, November 26, 2014 12:17 PM

Bet Americans wouldn't do much better when labeling geography around the world...in fact, Americans would probably do much worse!

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60 Minutes Video - Nearly 30 years after the explosion, Bob Simon travels to Ukraine and discovers the reactor still has the power to kill

60 Minutes Video - Nearly 30 years after the explosion, Bob Simon travels to Ukraine and discovers the reactor still has the power to kill | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Nearly 30 years after the explosion, Bob Simon travels to Ukraine and discovers the reactor still has the power to kill.
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The mother of Chinese food in America

The mother of Chinese food in America | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Mo Rocca meets Cecilia Chiang, the woman who is credited with introducing Americans to authentic Chinese cuisine.
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Mistrust Threatens Delicate Balance at a Sacred Site in Jerusalem

Mistrust Threatens Delicate Balance at a Sacred Site in Jerusalem | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
A site in the Old City of Jerusalem, known to Jews as the Temple Mount and to Muslims as the Noble Sanctuary, has been a flash point since the advent of modern Zionism.

Via Seth Dixon
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Bob Beaven's curator insight, March 19, 2015 3:29 PM

Landmarks can have powerful meanings to different groups of people.  The Dome of the Rock is a sacred site to Muslims across the world.  The Mosque has stood on the location for centuries, and it is said to be built on the site where Mohamed ascended to Heaven.  To Jews, however, this site represents where Solomon's Temple was located.  It was destroyed two times, once by the Babylonians and another time, after being rebuilt by the Roman Empire.  Today, all that remains of this sacred site is the Western Wall.  The Wall is a sacred location to many Jews as it represents their heritage and their nation.  Yet, as the article notes, many Muslims are threatened by the new Jewish interests in the site and they fear that it will be taken by the Israeli government and the Temple will be rebuilt a third time on the Temple Mount.  This shows how much emotion can exist over a piece of land.  The Jewish need to rebuild their temple right on the very spot it once stood, it cannot be built elsewhere, meanwhile some Muslims deny that the Temple ever stood there and there are others who believe that the site should be renamed to "Al Aqsa Mosque or the Noble Sanctuary".  This is one of the great arguments that I believe will never be solved, should the Temple be rebuilt at the expense of the Dome of the Rock?  

 

Molly McComb's curator insight, March 21, 2015 4:03 PM

Sacred sites in Jerusalem are having difficulties due to the differences in culture from the surrounding countries. 

Raychel Johnson's curator insight, March 22, 2015 12:19 AM

Summary: This article is simply over the Israel-Palestine conflict, and how it has evolved since its beginning. This mostly talks about how Palestine believes that if Israel gains control of Jerusalem, they will get rid of Dome of the Rock, an important place of worship for the Islams. 

 

Insight: I think this article accurately represents concepts of political power and territoriality well due to the fact that these two territories are having a very long dispute about this one piece of land. I think there is definitely a solution that should be relatively simple, but with the amount of meaning this location has to both places, and with the continues terrorism occurring, I don't know if a simple solution would work. 

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See How Humans Have Reshaped the Globe With This Interactive Atlas

See How Humans Have Reshaped the Globe With This Interactive Atlas | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"

Earth is changing rapidly, and an increasing number of scientists say that humans have become the dominant force driving these changes. While the term has no formal definition, many agree that we are now living in an age shaped by human activity: the Anthropocene.

Evidence for the Anthropocene ranges from worldwide population booms to the expansive transformation of the landscape. But solutions are cropping up at the local level that could help create a more resilient global community." 

 


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Olga Boldina's curator insight, December 3, 2014 3:25 AM

добавить ваше понимание ...

Truthbehere2's curator insight, December 5, 2014 10:01 AM

Well duh...we are very greedy leeches that don't want to take the time to restore and repair what we take and destroy...

Kristen McDaniel's curator insight, December 8, 2014 10:58 AM

Excellent use of an Esri Storymap to outline how humans have changed Earth over time.

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These fascinating maps show countries as named in their own languages - The Week Magazine

These fascinating maps show countries as named in their own languages - The Week Magazine | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
We hear Magyarország is lovely this time of year
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Most Tibetans Genetically Adapted To The High Life

Most Tibetans Genetically Adapted To The High Life | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Ninety percent of Tibetans share a genetic mutation that prevents their blood from becoming dangerously clogged with red blood cells at high altitudes—a response that can be deadly for non-native mountaineers. Karen Hopkin reports.

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Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, April 15, 2015 9:45 AM

This is extremely interesting.  When I think of the mutated gene that most Tibetans have I think of evolution happening right in front of our eyes.  Most lowland humans would not be able to survive at the Tibetan level of living, which goes to show you that over time the people who live in this area were naturally selected due to the special genes of their ancestors who survived while others without the gene died off.

Kevin Nguyen's curator insight, December 7, 2015 1:01 PM

The Tibetans are very amazing in the ways to adapting to high altitudes. Being 15,000 ft in elevation with 40% less oxygen than at sea level is very impressive. Many people like myself would find it difficult breathing in this conditions , but the Tibetans developed a mutation that lead them to not having their red blood cells clogged at this elevation. A perfect example of human adapting to their surrounding environment.

Corine Ramos's curator insight, December 8, 2015 8:18 PM

Genetic adaptations to a specific environment show how people are can be culturally and environmentally tied to a given land.  While most geographers are nervous to mention examples such as these for fear of being labeled too 'environmentally deterministic,' it does not hurt to show how that it is possible.  The fear of having your ideas be labeled and environmental determinism shouldn't stop us from exploring the human/environmental interface. 


Tags: environment, environment adapt, East Asia.

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The 1 in 6 People Around the World Who Continue to Survive on $1 or Less a Day

The 1 in 6 People Around the World Who Continue to Survive on $1 or Less a Day | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Although the eradication of extreme hunger and poverty was one of the eight United Nations Millennium Development Goals put forth in 2000, 1 in 6 people around the world continue to survive on $1 or less a day.
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Polar vortex animation

Animation from http://earth.nullschool.net - windspeed at 10 hPa (about ~26500m / ~87000 feet above sea level)

Via Seth Dixon
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Rich Schultz's curator insight, January 9, 2015 2:18 PM

Where's global warming when we need it?

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China's Growth Fuels Boom in World Shipping Traffic - National Geographic

China's Growth Fuels Boom in World Shipping Traffic - National Geographic | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
A new satellite study shows traffic on the world's oceans quadrupled over two decades, outpacing the growth in trade.
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China's Wealthy Want Their Children Educated Abroad

China's Wealthy Want Their Children Educated Abroad | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
The U.K. is the top pick for high school students, and the U.S. is most popular for undergrad and graduate studies
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Why Americans Call Turkey 'Turkey'

Why Americans Call Turkey 'Turkey' | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Within the turkey lies the tangled history of the world.
OK, not quite. But not far off, either.
‘Turkey’ the bird is native to North America. But ‘turkey’ the word is a geographic mess—a tribute to the vagaries of colonial trade and conquest.
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Welcome to The Coldest Place Inhabited By Humans on Earth

Welcome to The Coldest Place Inhabited By Humans on Earth | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Pictures reveal how humans survive in the coldest places on earth. The images alone will make you cold!

Via Barb Jemmott
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The Economist sur Twitter

The Economist sur Twitter | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
How big is Africa really? Much bigger than it looks on most maps http://econ.st/1vUvhmy pic.twitter.com/s14Te9FePM

Via Courtney Barrowman, Rich Schultz
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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, November 20, 2014 2:37 PM

unit 1

Rich Schultz's curator insight, November 26, 2014 1:45 PM

Yes, Africa is much larger than the rest of the world realizes!

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​PB & Thai? A spicy take on a lunch box classic

​PB  &  Thai? A spicy take on a lunch box classic | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
With a more adventurous palate, peanut butter lovers today are mixing it up with a classic spread
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​Art that's delicious: Roger Rowley's fruit plates

​Art that's delicious: Roger Rowley's fruit plates | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
An Idaho photographer documents the creative ways he get his kids to eat breakfast
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