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Why Twitter Ties Resemble Airline Hub Maps

Twitter is supposed to have turned the world into a global village. But new research shows that our Twitter ties are considerably more parochial than most of us imagine.

 

Globalization inherently means unequal access to technological resources and means of communication.  This is clear that major nodes of interconnection leapfrog others, but most people still have very place-based regional centers of interaction.  Geography still matters.   


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Currywurst on the Street

Currywurst on the Street | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Michael Slackman, The Times's Berlin Bureau Chief, looks into the city's obsession with a popular street dish that combines sausage, ketchup and curry powder. 

 

The globalization of food, immigration and the diffusion of cultural practices are all richly displayed in this short clip. 


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Shelby Porter's curator insight, September 26, 2013 6:36 AM

The globalization of food is becoming more apparent in todays culture than ever before. More and more restaurants from different parts of the world are showing up and alot of the food we as Americans are familar with are taking on some new ethnic influences. The currywurst is a great example of one country's culinary favorite around the time of WWII and enhancing it with an American and Indian by way of London flavor. And now it is one of the most popular treats someone can buy while in Germany. Many of our cultures foods are being influenced by others now and flavors are beginning to mix as well as our idea of where foods come from. The diffusion of cultural practices as well as the globalization of food will only grow stronger as time goes on, and so will our taste for a new culinary delight. 

Liam Michelsohn's curator insight, November 6, 2013 11:20 AM

Ahhh the currywurst on the street, well i thought this was great very informitive cultural video. The speical dish that is made and served among the streets in germany and all over,  it is thought to be a very weird and almost un appitizing meal to some one like my self.  However those food are very popular and prominate in there culture, just like certian foods, hotdog stands, flaffel carts and other foods that we enjoy have be come common in our culture. However I dont see currywurst hitting the streets of NYC any time soon.

Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, November 29, 2013 9:23 AM

The Currywurst sounds good but it seems that it will upset my stomach. I have a feeling it would. But it seems to be a hit were it is sold because that is what most people eat when they are on the streets burlin.

 

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Gullah Culture in Danger of Fading Away

Gullah Culture in Danger of Fading Away | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Time has stood still on the tiny rural island of St. Helena, South Carolina. And the people who live there, descendants of West African slaves who call themselves "Gullahs," want to keep it that way.

 

Diffusion, language, cultural syncretism, folk culture and globalization are themes that can all be taught using this old National Geographic article on Gullah culture.  For a documentary, see: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rCYBf-1yHmI


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Sinclair Tucker's comment, January 30, 2012 11:20 AM
this is quite interesting due to the fact that i grew up in West Africa, both Liberia, Ghana and Nigeria. Sierra Leone is my hometown neighbor which is Liberia. The slaves from Sierra Leone who now reside in south carolina still have their traditional ways. They eat okra and several other grains, with a lot of sea food because their hometown Sierra Leone is located on the west coast of africa.
elsa hunziker's comment, January 30, 2012 11:31 AM
"Culture is a dynamic phenomenon. There is no such thing as it remaining constant anywhere in the world," said Beverly John, a sociologist and executive assistant to the president at Chicago State University. "People often say, 'Show me the Gullah culture.' But culture comes from within. It isn't openly practiced. Therefore, the Gullah culture will survive." ...Wow!
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Why Place Matters in a Global Virtual World

Why Place Matters in a Global Virtual World | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

All Business is Local: Why Place Matters More Than Ever in a Global Virtual World.

 

Yes there are processes of globalization that are reshaping many dynamics, but as John Quelch and Katherine Jocz argue in their book coming out next month, this is an age of semi-globalization.  Even the world's best global brands are highly attuned to local tastes, cultures and patterns.  'Company bosses who focus too much on glamorous global strategy and the big picture risk getting burned in a world where the vast majority of business transactions are local' because of the difficulties in getting the local part of the strategy to resonate with consumers.   

 

How is the world still incredibly local?  What type of jobs are 'non-outsourceable?'


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In a networked world, why is the geography of knowledge still uneven?

In a networked world, why is the geography of knowledge still uneven? | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
In a networked world, why is the geography of knowledge still uneven?The Guardian (blog)Historical maps offer perhaps the best illustration of the geographic limitations to knowledge transmission.

 

While it may seem as though digital technologies is breaking down all age-old barriers, it is removing many barriers for certain segments of the population.  This distinct, often referred to as the 'digital divide,' is one that we can't ignore.  


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Don Brown Jr's comment, September 9, 2012 12:29 PM
This article brings some important question to ponder about when you think about the digital divide and technological diffusion. Within this issue it is revealed that there is more to the chasm between those who do and don’t have access to technology such as the unequal representation of information from certain groups. Diffusion of culture or idea always has a point of origins with technological diffusion taking route in the “Western” world and thus this information tends to have their idea or values. Like many school textbooks the argument can be made that there is a need to diversify the source of information available on the internet around the globe.
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How Twitter Proves That Place [still] Matters

How Twitter Proves That Place [still] Matters | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Social networks haven't replaced proximity - they just reinforce the importance of being near your friends and co-workers...

 

Why is place still important in an era of digital communication that was designed to 'conquer' distance and place?  What are the limits of globalization?   


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Linguistic diversity dwindling

Linguistic diversity dwindling | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"80% of all web communication is in ten languages, yet 95% of humanity speaks roughly 300 languages.  Could Apple Siri and Google Voice help save the world's languages?"

 

This graph stunningly displays the result of dwindling linguistic diversity in this era of globalization and technological innovation.  Why have so many languages been dwindling?  Why are an important few growing? What is the future of the majority of the world's languages that have so few native speakers?   


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GIS student's comment, September 18, 2012 7:57 AM
I think there is a lot of emphasis in this article based on help. The only way certain languages are going to survive is if people help promote them. I feel that most Americans are blind to the substantial amount of languages that exist because everywhere we look people are tuning English as there primary language. Global advertisements are commonly seen in English. The Olympics had an incredible amount as well. I think the root of this problem starts with education of new languages, especially in America. Language is definitely something that needs to be embraced especially at a younger age.
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Language on Twitter

Language on Twitter | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
API Cartographer Eric Fischer plots language shapefiles of Twitter.

 

Some other images show how social media cuts across place, time and culture and communications have 'defeated' geography to unite the world.  This image (besides looking pretty) shows that culture and place still matter within our increasingly interconnected globalized communications.  There are some very real creating obstacles to diffusion and even if the technology exists for "one huge conversation," there are non-intersecting conversations because of cultural and community differences. 


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TED Talk: Wade Davis on endangered cultures

TED Talks With stunning photos and stories, National Geographic Explorer Wade Davis celebrates the extraordinary diversity of the world's indigenous cultures, which are disappearing from the planet at an alarming rate.

 

This is a fantastic look at indigneous cultures around the world.


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Jesse Gauthier's comment, December 8, 2012 2:21 PM
The first thing that struck my attention in this video was when the speaker said that other cultures teach us about alternative ways to orient ourselves, as humans, on Earth. I never thought about cultures in that sense. When I would look at another culture that is much different from my own culture I just couldn’t comprehend their way of life. But, each culture is just using the Earth’s resources in many various ways, making us not so different in the end. It also makes it much easier to comprehend stranger cultures than our own.
Don Brown Jr's comment, December 10, 2012 7:27 PM
This video brings to light a real dilemma concerning the “plight” of indigenous cultures in the modern world. The forces of globalization has been accelerated by improvements in communication and transportation technologies which have made interaction seem almost instantaneous compared to previous centuries. Yet, this globalized world is changing our notions of significance and attachment to place due to this relative ease of mobility. I have to acknowledge that this is something the indigenous cultures haven’t lost. As Davis clearly explains, the relative isolation that these societies adapted to is becoming increasingly difficulty to maintain, as the forces of global economic integration is binding the world closer to gather (whether people like it or not).
Also another issue that concerns me revolves around the unintended consequences of trying to preserve these cultures. It is possible that we may be accelerating their extinction as external pressure from us may cause these indigenous cultures to become specialized areas which eventually become subject to “exotic” tourism and research, inevitably changing the culture of what was intended to be preserved.
John Caswell's curator insight, February 6, 6:59 AM

Important watch.

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Surviving progress

Surviving progress | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Ronald Wright's bestseller A Short History of Progress inspired this cinematic requiem to progress-as-usual. Throughout human history, what seemed like progress often backfired.

 

This critique of modern consumerism and how society interacts with the environment is fundamentally asking geographic questions about globalization.  Is all change progress?


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Globalization, Corporations and Franchises

Globalization, Corporations and Franchises | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

McDonald's and Starbucks can be seen as emblematic of the forces of globalization and the 'victors' of process as forcefully displayed in this graphic.  The local distinctive menu (not to mention the chef with a flair) typically loses out to the replicable, standardized and the familiar.  How come?  When is this not the case?  How does this change economics or culture? As a counter-point to globalization benefiting the chains, see how 'Yelp!' is reducing chains market share at: http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/ezra-klein/post/how-yelp-is-killing-chain-restaurants/2011/10/03/gIQAokJvHL_blog.html


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Elizabeth Allen's comment, November 16, 2012 2:08 PM
Many compnaies have to adapt to different cultures. Globalization is part of going outside the norm. Or what is considered the norm in one country is far different than the norm of another.
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Amazing Statistics

This mind blowing information shows how the virtual and online world is changing so rapidly. Did you know there are 31 billion searches on Google every singl...

 

Globalization, education and the changing technological landscape are all major themes in this video. 


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Containerization Shaped Globalization

Sometimes a single unlikely idea can have massive impact across the world. Sir Harold Evans, the author of They Made America, describes how frustration drove...

 

The economies of scale that globalization depends on, relies on logistics and transportation networks that can handle this high-volume.  In a word, the container, as mundane as it may seem, facilitated the era within which we live today. 


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Blanca Bernabé García's curator insight, October 4, 2013 11:01 AM

Una amena historia de la globalización 

Donald Dane's comment, December 10, 2013 7:06 AM
this video was probably the most interesting to me from class. it went to the root of this increase in shipping and broke it down to its bare structure and helped you see the true evolution of shipping around the world. starting from wooden ships traveling all the way around the southern tip of Brazil ending up stacking freight boats which travel through the panama canal. it went into depth about how the inventor of freight stacking thought of his idea. first by being a shipper himself but from a truck stand point and showed his evolution to designing to doing to mastering. now this idea and method is the only and fastest way for all shipping routes from Asia to americas from Europe to Africa.
Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 6, 7:12 AM

The economies of scale that globalization depends on, relies on logistics and transportation networks that can handle this high-volume.  In a word, the container, as mundane as it may seem, facilitated the era within which we live today.

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Globalizing the Local, Localizing the Global

Sheikha Al Mayassa, a patron of artists, storytellers and filmmakers in Qatar, talks about how art and culture create a country's identity -- and allow every country to share its unique identity with the wider world.

 

Oftentimes, we in the more developed world seek to change cultural practices and institutions in the developing world. This talk speaks to the importance of locally based agents for cultural change, specifically within the context of the Middle East. While we might wish to see what many perceive as universal rights spread throughout the world, the local cultural geographies must be taken into consideration into how to carry out any initiative that seeks to change local institutions.


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Katharine Norman's curator insight, September 14, 2013 10:19 PM

Sheikha provides an amazing talk that leaves no one denying that culture is the underlying thread that ties us all together.

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Undiscovered Possibilities - Google Earth

"While Germans tend to talk about privacy and how the internet takes away our freedom, chief Almir of the Surui tribe in Brazil came up with an idea when he first came in contact with Google Earth. He saw it as a great tool to visualize the devastation of the rainforest. With the help of Google providing the knowledge and equipment he started the project and provided an unfiltered perspective never seen before. This is a growing project on a growing problem that should matter to all of us. It’s never a service or product itself that matters; it’s what you do with it. Check the video and see for yourself."

Globalization inherently brings serendipitous juxtapositions. In this clip we see the merger of geospatial technologies to protect indigenous cultures and their cultural ecology.


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Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, January 23, 4:35 PM

Globalization

 

This video shows a positive side of globalization.  The use of first world technology in the third world to stop illegal foresting is a great example of the positive effects of globalization.  When people talk about globalization it is usually in negative terms, the damage it does to the environment and cultures.  Globalization can be a force for good but it has just as often been a force of destruction and dislocation.  Globalization in itself is a neutral force it is the way it is used that created a positive or negative impact.  Globalization has been occurring since the 1500 when European traders began trading with the Arab and the Asian regions.  The swapping of languages and cultural ideas has been going on for as long.  Today the speed of globalization is what many people are worried about.  In the past it was slower and more controlled, today with instant communications the changes are rapid and chaotic.  This can be scary and disturbing.  The way people in developing countries deal with these changes are not that much different form how the developed world dealt with the same or similar changes 100 years ago.  The world today is watching and so the developing countries are more visible in their industrialization and labor problems then the developed countries were when they went through the same processes.  The end result of Globalization is anyone’s guess but there is no denying that it has changed the world we live in.

Amy Marques's curator insight, January 29, 8:03 PM

This is a great example that shows the positive and negative effects of globalization. The negative effects is that the chief Almir and the Surui tribe have changed from their original roots through contact with the outside world. Their language and clothing has been altered because we see the cheif speaking brazilian portugese and the tribe wearing western clothing. The positive aspect is that they are trying to protect their ancient rain forests by using the benefits of globalization. I think its great that Google is helping this tribe, of course Google is getting tons of recognition for this, but they are doing wonders for this group of people. With the technology provided the tribe will be able to be put on the map and educate its group.

chris tobin's curator insight, February 6, 8:12 AM

this will help protect the forest and decrease deforestation hopefully, also protecting global climate and environment.   How does this affect the large companies in paper mills, timber and especially the specialty tree plantations.........roads cutting through the rainforest ......wildlife........

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Born in the USA, Made in France

Born in the USA, Made in France | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Born in the USA, Made in France: How McDonald's Succeeds in the Land of Michelin Stars by Knowledge@Wharton, the online business journal of the Wharton School.

 

While many portray McDonald's as the embodiment of all that is wrong with globalization, the diffusion of McDonald's is not a simple replication of the American fast food chain and exporting it elsewhere...a lot of local adaptations on a global model is part of McDonald's successful economic model.   Although I'm not a fan of the word "glocalization" to describe how local flavor adds spice to globalized phenomenon, it most certainly fits here.   


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Shake the Dust

This trailer for the documentary 'Shake the Dust' shows the globalization of youth culture and the diffusion of the creative art known as break dancing. This film challenges its developed-world viewers to reconceptualize how they perceive the lives of people living in the developing world as more than just poverty and misery, but to see the humanity and joy. In this 12 minute clip, you'll see portrayals of teenagers in Uganda and Yemen who are a part of cultural institutions and can be agents for change within their society and even political forces.  For more information about the documentary, visit: http://www.shakethedust.org


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NYTimes Video: Cultivating Dinner

NYTimes Video: Cultivating Dinner | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Americans ate 475 million pounds of tilapia last year, making this once obscure African native the most popular farmed fish in the United States.

 

Industrial farming, human-introduced species, GMOs, outsourcing and environmental impacts are but some of the relevant themes from this video.  How are global taste buds reshaping the geographic landscape? 


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 25, 2013 6:04 AM

Industrial farming, human-introduced species, GMOs, outsourcing and environmental impacts are but some of the relevant themes from this video.  How are global taste buds reshaping the geographic landscape?


Tags: GMOsindustry, food, agriculture, agribusiness,

 

Cynthia Williams's curator insight, July 25, 2013 9:44 AM

My concern is how safe is bioengineered food?  How has its nutritional content been altered?  Until some of our questions about bioengineered food can be answered by the FDA and other government officials I remain leery about the potential side effects that might occur from eating it and wonder how nutritious it really is.

megan b clement's curator insight, December 15, 2013 10:59 PM
The video discusses how now alot of countries are industrially farm raising their fish. Tilapia is a perfect example Americans ate 475 million pounds of Tilapia last year. Ten years ago you would never even hear about Tilapia because it was not a popular fish. Times have changed how they raise them and then ship them out the video shows one of the farms where they grow the TIlapia.
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Freakonomics: What Will Globalization Do to Languages?

Freakonomics: What Will Globalization Do to Languages? | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"The headline says it all, although the unspoken question is: will globalization indeed result in the hegemony of English, as has long been promised/threatened?"  This is a forum with Christian Rolling (U.N. interpreter), Mark Liberman (Linguistics professor at Penn), Henry Hitchings (author of 'Secret Life of Words'), and John Hayden (president of an ELL site).


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Asia's rise -- How and When?

"TED Talks Hans Rosling was a young guest student in India when he first realized that Asia had all the capacities to reclaim its place as the world's dominant economic force."

 

Regions, cultures and economies are not static in this era of globalization.  However, in the United States we are accustomed to a position of prominence that is assumed to be a 'birthright.'  The data presented here shows how countries such as India and China might "catch up" to the United States and United Kingdom later in the 21st century (2048?). 


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cookiesrgreat's comment, April 12, 2012 10:54 AM
India could out pace China in the Global Market, but it needs to address its infrastructure, Islam-Hindu conflict and become a first world country not a third world sidekick.
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TED Talk: Wade Davis on endangered cultures

TED Talks With stunning photos and stories, National Geographic Explorer Wade Davis celebrates the extraordinary diversity of the world's indigenous cultures, which are disappearing from the planet at an alarming rate.

 

This is a fantastic look at indigneous cultures around the world.


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Jesse Gauthier's comment, December 8, 2012 2:21 PM
The first thing that struck my attention in this video was when the speaker said that other cultures teach us about alternative ways to orient ourselves, as humans, on Earth. I never thought about cultures in that sense. When I would look at another culture that is much different from my own culture I just couldn’t comprehend their way of life. But, each culture is just using the Earth’s resources in many various ways, making us not so different in the end. It also makes it much easier to comprehend stranger cultures than our own.
Don Brown Jr's comment, December 10, 2012 7:27 PM
This video brings to light a real dilemma concerning the “plight” of indigenous cultures in the modern world. The forces of globalization has been accelerated by improvements in communication and transportation technologies which have made interaction seem almost instantaneous compared to previous centuries. Yet, this globalized world is changing our notions of significance and attachment to place due to this relative ease of mobility. I have to acknowledge that this is something the indigenous cultures haven’t lost. As Davis clearly explains, the relative isolation that these societies adapted to is becoming increasingly difficulty to maintain, as the forces of global economic integration is binding the world closer to gather (whether people like it or not).
Also another issue that concerns me revolves around the unintended consequences of trying to preserve these cultures. It is possible that we may be accelerating their extinction as external pressure from us may cause these indigenous cultures to become specialized areas which eventually become subject to “exotic” tourism and research, inevitably changing the culture of what was intended to be preserved.
John Caswell's curator insight, February 6, 6:59 AM

Important watch.

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The Evolution of Western Dance Music

The Evolution of Western Dance Music | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"An Interactive Graphic Showing The Evolution of Western Dance Music Over The Last 100 Years in Under 20 seconds..."

 

Excellent visualization of diffusion as well as cultural syncretism in the pop cultures affiliated with globalization.  


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Seth Dixon's comment, November 4, 2011 1:36 PM
Thanks to one of my favorite people at my table at the APHG reading in Cincy for posting this link on FB.
Lisa Fonseca's comment, November 8, 2011 7:12 PM
This is a great visual to demonstrate the connection between cultures. We are such a diverse society and I think it is very important to be interconnected with other cultures and be aware of them. Looking at that visual it demonstrates with each year going by more and more pop culture gets connected with other countries.
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VIDEO: "The World is Flat"

VIDEO: "The World is Flat" | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

A lengthy (1h, 15m) video, where New York Times columnist and author Thomas Friedman explains his ideas about globalization, as laid out in his book "The World is Flat."  This was filmed as a keynote address from M.I.T. and also can show students in high school the vibrant intellectual life available on college campuses.    


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Why Foreign Students are Hired for Alaskan Fish Processing Jobs

Why Foreign Students are Hired for Alaskan Fish Processing Jobs | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Foreign students come to Alaska under a special cultural exchange visa.

 

Globalization, migration, culture and economics all merge in this issue...good for bringing things together as a "synthesis" piece.  


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Shanghai: 1990 vs. 2010

Shanghai: 1990 vs. 2010 | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

Globalization has hit...hard and fast. 


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Maegan Connor's curator insight, December 17, 2013 8:02 PM

Shanghai could arguably be the best example of globalization in the world today. In the span of 20 years, it has gone from a sparse city with some commerce on the river to a major urban center with the skyscrapers and neon lights. The transformation between the two images is staggering and it's easy to see the resemblance between current day Shanghai and it's partner globalized cities like New York and Seoul.

Cam E's curator insight, April 8, 8:23 AM

Apart from what can be said about the process of Globalization, this is just impressive under the lens of what can be done in 20 years to change the skylines and landscapes of an area. Notice the lack of vegetation in the second picture, and while it may just be an effect of the different time of day or season, they sky seems a lot more fogged in the second picture, possibly due to pollution.

Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, April 14, 3:35 PM

Shanghai has transformed and globalized so quickly in the last twenty years that it doesn't even look like that same place. Skies that were once seen are now blocked by skyscrapers. Buildings that still remain are overpowered and do not stand out like they once did.