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Socket map of the world

Socket map of the world | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Tags: cartography, technology, globalization, historical, regions, mapping, colonialism.
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 17, 2012 3:57 PM

This map might appear to be completely trivial and it probably is.  Still, there are interesting historical and colonial patterns that can be seen in this technological culture region map. 


Questions to Ponder: Will there one day be a single format?  When?  What are barrier to that happening?  What does this tell us about the extent of globalization?

Mr Ortloff's curator insight, July 23, 2013 4:01 PM

You can map ANYTHING!!!

Justin McCullough's curator insight, December 12, 2013 1:36 PM

This map is interesting because it shows where the former British Empire had its influences , especially in British-Africa territories. The only four countries that use the light blue are all in the southern hemisphere as the article points out, and the American model can be largely seen in the western hemisphere, However, there is the American model in Saudi Arabia. It seems that the rest of the world uses the light green or the dark green models. 

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Production in the New Global Economy

Production in the New Global Economy | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Executives have long said America can’t compete in building electronic devices. But the migration of carmaking from Japan is a case study in the most unlikely of transformations.

 

"The iEconomy: Nissan’s Move to U.S. Offers Lessons for Tech Industry."  This is an excellent article on how the car and tech industries are changing the global economy.  Numerous foreign car companies are now investing in US; so is a Nissan produced in Tennessee a foreign car or a domestic?  The global economy is blurring many of the traditional ways in which we view production   and affecting the United States in particular. The interactive feature linked to the article provides some excellent data and resources.   This would be a great background to prepare students before taking a sample test AP Human Geography test (like Question #3 from 2011).


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Globalization in a Nutshell

Globalization in a Nutshell | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

Yeah, it's a commercial, but it's really cool. 


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Turbulence on the Mekong River

Turbulence on the Mekong River | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
The Mekong River was once a wild and primitive backwater. Today, growing demands for electricity and rapid economic growth are changing the character of what is the world's 12th-longest river.

 

Economic progress for some often entails job loss and environmental degradation for others.  The once isolated and remote Mekong is experiences some impacts of globalization with residents having mixed feelings about the prospects. 


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Emma Lafleur's curator insight, April 30, 2013 8:03 PM

It seems to be a theme that across the bored, people are building things that directly and negatively impact the environment and the local people. There are always two sides to the problem. On one hand, the dam can help with the development of Laos because it will bring in money, but it will also destroy the fish population and therefore many fishermen will lose their jobs and people will lose a food source. It is a difficult problem because Laos needs money because there is a lot of poverty in this rural country and the fishermen do not add a whole lot to the economy, but the people need a way to survive and make money for their families as well. It's a problem that I think will be around for generation to come.

Al Picozzi's curator insight, November 26, 2013 11:35 AM

Seems the price of modernizing will be the local economy that as existed here for centuries.  It is not a small industy either, it is according to the report a billion dollar fishing industry.  However with a growing population and a demand for electricity the river is the perfect source for this power.  This globalization, like all globalization, will help some and will hurt some.  What you have to ask yourself is will it help more than it hurts?  Will it help in the long run, over time?  For everyone involoved in globalization these answeres are never the same everywhere.

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, December 15, 9:21 PM

The Mekong river is a river that many fisherman in Laos depend on for food and income. Plans to build dams that will cause the fish to seek an alternate route to migrate upstream. Critics of the dams say that the dams will cause the fish to abandon the Mekong river and go through their neighboring rivers, leaving the residents without a source of income. Many in favor of the dams say the reverse, that building the dams will boost economy and cause the area to flourish.

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Containerization Shaped Globalization

Sometimes a single unlikely idea can have massive impact across the world. Sir Harold Evans, the author of They Made America, describes how frustration drove...

 

The economies of scale that globalization depends on, relies on logistics and transportation networks that can handle this high-volume.  In a word, the container, as mundane as it may seem, facilitated the era within which we live today. 


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Kaitlin Young's curator insight, November 22, 1:58 PM

This video proves how a simple idea has the potential to change the world. The truck driver had the insight to notice when the current shipping system was not particularly effective and had the ingenuity to do something about it. Because of this man, containerization was allowed to change how goods could move around the world. As goods move, they also spread different cultures through food, ideas, technology, and beliefs. Without this process, globalization would not be at the level that it exists at today. . 

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 7, 5:26 PM

I always enjoyed TED videos. What really struck me was the opening sentence of the video, "everything is everywhere these days." This is so true in so many ways. The video uses different examples that you can find in different stores from places all over the world. How many things can you could in your bedroom that says "Made in China" or some other place other than the US? This is very common as we all know. Products and goods come from all over the world and even over seas. This is a process that we call globalization. However, the video introduces a process called containerization. This process saves an ample amount of time for the workers. The process was a success. "shrinking the world and enlarging human choice."

Michael Mazo's curator insight, December 10, 7:48 PM

Globalization has connected the world in such a way that we hadn't thought possible. This idea has created rising economies all over the world and has made transport of goods and services move faster and continues to increase this rate with advances in technology. Containerization is a staple of globalization and without it, none of these products would be able to get from country to country. In essence it has developed the world of import and exports. To add to this success, globalization has also created jobs and communities which revolve heavily around the transport of goods. It saves time by using massive containers to move goods and it creates opportunities in places where it had not been possible before. 

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The sun never sets... on the Facebook Empire

The sun never sets... on the Facebook Empire | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
How Facebook connections mirror old empires EIGHT years ago Facebook launched as an online social network connecting a small college community from a dorm room at Harvard University.

 

These graphics show how in a post-colonial world, former colonies are still socially intertwined in a cultural network that mirrors the empires of yesteryear. Why are these modern social networks so similar to imperial patterns? What economic explanations are there for these patterns? What is the cultural impact?


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Lona Pradeep Parad's curator insight, May 29, 11:38 AM

How fb has made physical distance obsolete, connecting cultures to different cultures on a global scale.

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Why Twitter Ties Resemble Airline Hub Maps

Twitter is supposed to have turned the world into a global village. But new research shows that our Twitter ties are considerably more parochial than most of us imagine.

 

Globalization inherently means unequal access to technological resources and means of communication.  This is clear that major nodes of interconnection leapfrog others, but most people still have very place-based regional centers of interaction.  Geography still matters.   


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Currywurst on the Street

Currywurst on the Street | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Michael Slackman, The Times's Berlin Bureau Chief, looks into the city's obsession with a popular street dish that combines sausage, ketchup and curry powder. 

 

The globalization of food, immigration and the diffusion of cultural practices are all richly displayed in this short clip. 


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Shelby Porter's curator insight, September 26, 2013 9:36 AM

The globalization of food is becoming more apparent in todays culture than ever before. More and more restaurants from different parts of the world are showing up and alot of the food we as Americans are familar with are taking on some new ethnic influences. The currywurst is a great example of one country's culinary favorite around the time of WWII and enhancing it with an American and Indian by way of London flavor. And now it is one of the most popular treats someone can buy while in Germany. Many of our cultures foods are being influenced by others now and flavors are beginning to mix as well as our idea of where foods come from. The diffusion of cultural practices as well as the globalization of food will only grow stronger as time goes on, and so will our taste for a new culinary delight. 

Liam Michelsohn's curator insight, November 6, 2013 2:20 PM

Ahhh the currywurst on the street, well i thought this was great very informitive cultural video. The speical dish that is made and served among the streets in germany and all over,  it is thought to be a very weird and almost un appitizing meal to some one like my self.  However those food are very popular and prominate in there culture, just like certian foods, hotdog stands, flaffel carts and other foods that we enjoy have be come common in our culture. However I dont see currywurst hitting the streets of NYC any time soon.

Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, November 29, 2013 12:23 PM

The Currywurst sounds good but it seems that it will upset my stomach. I have a feeling it would. But it seems to be a hit were it is sold because that is what most people eat when they are on the streets burlin.

 

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Gullah Culture in Danger of Fading Away

Gullah Culture in Danger of Fading Away | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Time has stood still on the tiny rural island of St. Helena, South Carolina. And the people who live there, descendants of West African slaves who call themselves "Gullahs," want to keep it that way.

 

Diffusion, language, cultural syncretism, folk culture and globalization are themes that can all be taught using this old National Geographic article on Gullah culture.  For a documentary, see: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rCYBf-1yHmI


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Sinclair Tucker's comment, January 30, 2012 2:20 PM
this is quite interesting due to the fact that i grew up in West Africa, both Liberia, Ghana and Nigeria. Sierra Leone is my hometown neighbor which is Liberia. The slaves from Sierra Leone who now reside in south carolina still have their traditional ways. They eat okra and several other grains, with a lot of sea food because their hometown Sierra Leone is located on the west coast of africa.
elsa hunziker's comment, January 30, 2012 2:31 PM
"Culture is a dynamic phenomenon. There is no such thing as it remaining constant anywhere in the world," said Beverly John, a sociologist and executive assistant to the president at Chicago State University. "People often say, 'Show me the Gullah culture.' But culture comes from within. It isn't openly practiced. Therefore, the Gullah culture will survive." ...Wow!
Olivia G Torres's curator insight, November 6, 10:03 PM

This was an interesting article of the culture and people of the society called the Gullahs. This is about how this type of people are living on an island and how they still live like the ancestors who inhabited the land before them. This was interesting to me because of the measures that are being taken to maintain the  culture that has survived for hundreds of years. The government is getting involved in how to keep this and on if they should assign it to be a national park. This bring up questions for me like why this culture, why this area, what is so important of the culture that the government has decided to intervene?

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Why Place Matters in a Global Virtual World

Why Place Matters in a Global Virtual World | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

All Business is Local: Why Place Matters More Than Ever in a Global Virtual World.

 

Yes there are processes of globalization that are reshaping many dynamics, but as John Quelch and Katherine Jocz argue in their book coming out next month, this is an age of semi-globalization.  Even the world's best global brands are highly attuned to local tastes, cultures and patterns.  'Company bosses who focus too much on glamorous global strategy and the big picture risk getting burned in a world where the vast majority of business transactions are local' because of the difficulties in getting the local part of the strategy to resonate with consumers.   

 

How is the world still incredibly local?  What type of jobs are 'non-outsourceable?'


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In a networked world, why is the geography of knowledge still uneven?

In a networked world, why is the geography of knowledge still uneven? | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
In a networked world, why is the geography of knowledge still uneven?The Guardian (blog)Historical maps offer perhaps the best illustration of the geographic limitations to knowledge transmission.

 

While it may seem as though digital technologies is breaking down all age-old barriers, it is removing many barriers for certain segments of the population.  This distinct, often referred to as the 'digital divide,' is one that we can't ignore.  


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Don Brown Jr's comment, September 9, 2012 3:29 PM
This article brings some important question to ponder about when you think about the digital divide and technological diffusion. Within this issue it is revealed that there is more to the chasm between those who do and don’t have access to technology such as the unequal representation of information from certain groups. Diffusion of culture or idea always has a point of origins with technological diffusion taking route in the “Western” world and thus this information tends to have their idea or values. Like many school textbooks the argument can be made that there is a need to diversify the source of information available on the internet around the globe.
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How Twitter Proves That Place [still] Matters

How Twitter Proves That Place [still] Matters | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Social networks haven't replaced proximity - they just reinforce the importance of being near your friends and co-workers...

 

Why is place still important in an era of digital communication that was designed to 'conquer' distance and place?  What are the limits of globalization?   


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Linguistic diversity dwindling

Linguistic diversity dwindling | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"80% of all web communication is in ten languages, yet 95% of humanity speaks roughly 300 languages.  Could Apple Siri and Google Voice help save the world's languages?"

 

This graph stunningly displays the result of dwindling linguistic diversity in this era of globalization and technological innovation.  Why have so many languages been dwindling?  Why are an important few growing? What is the future of the majority of the world's languages that have so few native speakers?   


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GIS student's comment, September 18, 2012 10:57 AM
I think there is a lot of emphasis in this article based on help. The only way certain languages are going to survive is if people help promote them. I feel that most Americans are blind to the substantial amount of languages that exist because everywhere we look people are tuning English as there primary language. Global advertisements are commonly seen in English. The Olympics had an incredible amount as well. I think the root of this problem starts with education of new languages, especially in America. Language is definitely something that needs to be embraced especially at a younger age.
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The Voices of China's Workers

TED Talks In the ongoing debate about globalization, what's been missing is the voices of workers -- the millions of people who migrate to factories in China and other emerging countries to make goods sold all over the world.


Our collective understanding of modern industrialization and globalization needs to go beyond the binary of "oppressors" and "victims."  This lecture explores the voices and lives of Chinese workers that we so often simply see as simply victims of a system, but are full of ambition and agency. 

 

Tags: industry, globalization, labor, China, TED. 


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Ryli Smith's comment, May 5, 2013 2:55 PM
In these Chinese factories, they don't view these jobs as harsh or poor treatment because this is better than how they would be doing back in their villages. They want these jobs so bad because they will give them a better life. Also, you have to remember that not all of these Chinese factory workers want to have an iPhone or a Coach purse or Nike shoes, because those things don't have any worth in their culture.
Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 17, 5:26 PM

The plight of Chinese workers today is incredibly great. This TED talks explains the situations many in China find themselves in the terrible conditions they must work in. While us in the west see this as unthinkable China's model for success and expansion comes at the cost of their workforce who are subjugated to poor working conditions as very low pay. The real hope for this to change is for the nation as a whole to become wealthy enough that these workers will be able to demand fair wages and work environments. 

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 17, 11:08 PM

These workers do see their jobs as opportunities. This video is a great eye opener for people who tend to fall into the trap of looking at globalization as a system of haves and have nots. 

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Five of Asia's Most Endangered Languages

Five of Asia's Most Endangered Languages | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Meet the "hairy Ainu" of Japan, Taiwan's Saaroa, the Kusunda of Nepal, the last Manchus and the Jarawa of India's Andaman Islands.

 

The rapid spread of  Mandarin, English, Spanish, Hindi-Urdu and Arabic as the 5 largest languages (most native speakers) is connected to the spread of globalization and the cultural aspects of that phenomenon.  These 5 declining languages represent the flip side of those cultural patterns.  


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The Endangered Languages Project

The Endangered Languages Project is a website for people to find and share the most up-to-date and comprehensive information about the over 3,000 endangered ...

 

This short video is a great primer for understanding the importance of linguistic diversity.  Why the loss of linguistic diversity (a global phenomenon) related to other themes  on geography, such as political and economic autonomy for minority groups?  Why are so many languages vanishing today?  What forces are creating these emerging cultural patterns?  For more on the project, see: http://www.endangeredlanguages.com/


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Matt Nardone's comment, September 2, 2012 3:52 PM
I learned a lot from this video/article. I can not believe out of 7000 languages today only about half will survive by the new century. I never thought of language loss as a result of injustice and oppression of a culture. I think that it is very interesting that to save a language means to restore a cultures ideals, ideology, and norms. I think that it is pretty cool Google is trying to help perserve some of the languages that may be fading. It is neat to think that one of the largest social media/communication companies has a great interest not in a universal language BUT a great interest in maintaining differences and uniquenesses about languages.
Adrian Francisco's comment, September 3, 2012 11:04 AM
I like this project and how it preserves languages that are about to die. It's not good when a language dies because there might be some information written in the language and in the future when we look at books we would not know what it is saying.
Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, November 29, 2013 11:59 AM

This is a great website in which everyone should look at because it shows how everyone can come together and help preserve all these languages we all hear today. Day by day languages are becoming extinct because they are speaking English one of the most spoken languages in the world and everyone speaks it or speaks little of it that people can understand. More languages are becoming extinct day by day.

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The lost tribe

The lost tribe | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Isolation or inclusion - can India protect an ancient Andaman tribe on the verge of extinction?

 

"An ancient indigenous tribe is on the verge of extinction in India's Andaman Islands. Habitat loss, disease and exploitation could wipe out the 400-strong Jarawa tribe, who still hunt using bows and arrows.

 

Lapses in policing and continued activity by tour operators, who encourage 'human safaris' where Jarawa women and children have in the past performed for tourists, are partly to blame for jeopardising the tribe's existence.  Many activists want to close the main road into the tribal reserve to protect the tribe from further interaction with the outside world, but it is a lifeline providing food and work for the island's 600,000 inhabitants.

 

To include or isolate?"


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The world map of chocolate (made out of chocolate)

The world map of chocolate (made out of chocolate) | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
You may be focussing on chocolate over the weekend - but where does it come from? A global trade analysed. In chocolate (this is what maps are made for!

 

What is the geography of chocolate like?  There is a dark side (no pun intended) to the production of cocoa in many places such as West Africa. 


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ethne staniland's curator insight, May 16, 2013 11:33 AM

Interesting for our KS1 chocolate topic.

Brett Sinica's curator insight, November 10, 2013 5:43 PM

We all love chocolate.  We all love diamonds and jewels.  In western worlds, these items are easily come by in grocery stores and elsewhere, but what got them there was a challenge.  People in poorer tropical regions around the world worked to get the raw goods of these delicate items we all enjoy.  The payout difference is immense from cocoa to chocolate.  It is sometimes a very crooked market where if it wasn't for the hard working people who get the raw ingredients, chocolate as we know it wouldn't be the same.

Edelin Espino's curator insight, December 5, 11:06 AM

I hope the production keep growing up. We need more chocolate and specially in Africa. 

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Visualizing the Global Carbon Footprint

Visualizing the Global Carbon Footprint | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

One of the key things I reinforce in conversations about globalization is that the advantages are unevenly distributed and the negative externalities to the system are also unevenly distributed.  This clever infographic highlights both rather effectively. 


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Dale Fraza's comment, February 27, 2012 3:26 PM
Really surprised at a couple things:
1. Brazil's relative tinyness in comparison with the U.S. Guess I've always just heard bad things about Brazil in regards to deforestation and the like.
2. Just how much a formerly agricultural nation (China) has exploded. Something really needs to be done about the environmental havoc they are wreaking (not to be a total ethnocentrist or anything).
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Globalizing the Local, Localizing the Global

Sheikha Al Mayassa, a patron of artists, storytellers and filmmakers in Qatar, talks about how art and culture create a country's identity -- and allow every country to share its unique identity with the wider world.

 

Oftentimes, we in the more developed world seek to change cultural practices and institutions in the developing world. This talk speaks to the importance of locally based agents for cultural change, specifically within the context of the Middle East. While we might wish to see what many perceive as universal rights spread throughout the world, the local cultural geographies must be taken into consideration into how to carry out any initiative that seeks to change local institutions.


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Katharine Norman's curator insight, September 15, 2013 1:19 AM

Sheikha provides an amazing talk that leaves no one denying that culture is the underlying thread that ties us all together.

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Undiscovered Possibilities - Google Earth

"While Germans tend to talk about privacy and how the internet takes away our freedom, chief Almir of the Surui tribe in Brazil came up with an idea when he first came in contact with Google Earth. He saw it as a great tool to visualize the devastation of the rainforest. With the help of Google providing the knowledge and equipment he started the project and provided an unfiltered perspective never seen before. This is a growing project on a growing problem that should matter to all of us. It’s never a service or product itself that matters; it’s what you do with it. Check the video and see for yourself."

Globalization inherently brings serendipitous juxtapositions. In this clip we see the merger of geospatial technologies to protect indigenous cultures and their cultural ecology.


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Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, January 23, 7:35 PM

Globalization

 

This video shows a positive side of globalization.  The use of first world technology in the third world to stop illegal foresting is a great example of the positive effects of globalization.  When people talk about globalization it is usually in negative terms, the damage it does to the environment and cultures.  Globalization can be a force for good but it has just as often been a force of destruction and dislocation.  Globalization in itself is a neutral force it is the way it is used that created a positive or negative impact.  Globalization has been occurring since the 1500 when European traders began trading with the Arab and the Asian regions.  The swapping of languages and cultural ideas has been going on for as long.  Today the speed of globalization is what many people are worried about.  In the past it was slower and more controlled, today with instant communications the changes are rapid and chaotic.  This can be scary and disturbing.  The way people in developing countries deal with these changes are not that much different form how the developed world dealt with the same or similar changes 100 years ago.  The world today is watching and so the developing countries are more visible in their industrialization and labor problems then the developed countries were when they went through the same processes.  The end result of Globalization is anyone’s guess but there is no denying that it has changed the world we live in.

Amy Marques's curator insight, January 29, 11:03 PM

This is a great example that shows the positive and negative effects of globalization. The negative effects is that the chief Almir and the Surui tribe have changed from their original roots through contact with the outside world. Their language and clothing has been altered because we see the cheif speaking brazilian portugese and the tribe wearing western clothing. The positive aspect is that they are trying to protect their ancient rain forests by using the benefits of globalization. I think its great that Google is helping this tribe, of course Google is getting tons of recognition for this, but they are doing wonders for this group of people. With the technology provided the tribe will be able to be put on the map and educate its group.

chris tobin's curator insight, February 6, 11:12 AM

this will help protect the forest and decrease deforestation hopefully, also protecting global climate and environment.   How does this affect the large companies in paper mills, timber and especially the specialty tree plantations.........roads cutting through the rainforest ......wildlife........

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Born in the USA, Made in France

Born in the USA, Made in France | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Born in the USA, Made in France: How McDonald's Succeeds in the Land of Michelin Stars by Knowledge@Wharton, the online business journal of the Wharton School.

 

While many portray McDonald's as the embodiment of all that is wrong with globalization, the diffusion of McDonald's is not a simple replication of the American fast food chain and exporting it elsewhere...a lot of local adaptations on a global model is part of McDonald's successful economic model.   Although I'm not a fan of the word "glocalization" to describe how local flavor adds spice to globalized phenomenon, it most certainly fits here.   


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Shake the Dust

This trailer for the documentary 'Shake the Dust' shows the globalization of youth culture and the diffusion of the creative art known as break dancing. This film challenges its developed-world viewers to reconceptualize how they perceive the lives of people living in the developing world as more than just poverty and misery, but to see the humanity and joy. In this 12 minute clip, you'll see portrayals of teenagers in Uganda and Yemen who are a part of cultural institutions and can be agents for change within their society and even political forces.  For more information about the documentary, visit: http://www.shakethedust.org


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NYTimes Video: Cultivating Dinner

NYTimes Video: Cultivating Dinner | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Americans ate 475 million pounds of tilapia last year, making this once obscure African native the most popular farmed fish in the United States.

 

Industrial farming, human-introduced species, GMOs, outsourcing and environmental impacts are but some of the relevant themes from this video.  How are global taste buds reshaping the geographic landscape? 


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 25, 2013 9:04 AM

Industrial farming, human-introduced species, GMOs, outsourcing and environmental impacts are but some of the relevant themes from this video.  How are global taste buds reshaping the geographic landscape?


Tags: GMOsindustry, food, agriculture, agribusiness,

 

Cynthia Williams's curator insight, July 25, 2013 12:44 PM

My concern is how safe is bioengineered food?  How has its nutritional content been altered?  Until some of our questions about bioengineered food can be answered by the FDA and other government officials I remain leery about the potential side effects that might occur from eating it and wonder how nutritious it really is.

megan b clement's curator insight, December 16, 2013 1:59 AM
The video discusses how now alot of countries are industrially farm raising their fish. Tilapia is a perfect example Americans ate 475 million pounds of Tilapia last year. Ten years ago you would never even hear about Tilapia because it was not a popular fish. Times have changed how they raise them and then ship them out the video shows one of the farms where they grow the TIlapia.
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Freakonomics: What Will Globalization Do to Languages?

Freakonomics: What Will Globalization Do to Languages? | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"The headline says it all, although the unspoken question is: will globalization indeed result in the hegemony of English, as has long been promised/threatened?"  This is a forum with Christian Rolling (U.N. interpreter), Mark Liberman (Linguistics professor at Penn), Henry Hitchings (author of 'Secret Life of Words'), and John Hayden (president of an ELL site).


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