AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO
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AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO
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Demographic elements - Thematic Map - World

Demographic elements - Thematic Map - World | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

Via oyndrila, Malmci@Spatialzone
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oyndrila's curator insight, October 3, 2013 9:16 AM

An useful tool to discuss causes and consequences of different aspects of demography in different parts of the world.

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Not Just a Southern Thing: The Changing Geography of American Poverty

Not Just a Southern Thing: The Changing Geography of American Poverty | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Thirty years ago, the states with the deepest poverty were all clustered in dixie. But the rest of the country has been playing catchup.

 

So how did poverty stop being a Southern specialty? You've had, deindustrialization in the Midwest and Northeast. And you've had fast growing Hispanic populations, which tend to be poorer, in California, Nevada, Arizona, and Colorado (as well as North Carolina and Georgia, which could explain their presence on the list above).  Meanwhile, the Southeast has made some economic progress by attracting foreign manufacturing, among other efforts.


Via Seth Dixon, ApocalypseSurvival
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viknesh's curator insight, March 2, 2014 9:42 AM

When Americans think of poverty, they often times think of the southern states. However, that was most accurate 30 years ago. As time progesses, other states, especially New York, have been catching up drastically. Poverty is not only a southern thing, but a factor in on the growing rates of low income households across the United States. Although the quality of life among the states of low income households may vary, the povery levels do not.

Nick Smith's curator insight, September 2, 2014 4:19 PM

Poverty, no longer a southern thing. What has changed this?

Nicholas Patrie's curator insight, October 20, 2014 12:16 PM

not only has poverty increased drastically in the south and spread west but also states that where considered to be low percentage of poverty have increased to poverty. many states up north are now in danger. the economy hasn't increased at all in the last twenty plus years and it should be interesting to see what happens in the future, hopefully the south doesn't get too far under the poverty line to the point where it can't be brought back.

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85 richest people as wealthy as poorest half of the world


Via oyndrila
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oyndrila's curator insight, January 21, 2014 12:21 PM

The  phenomenal extent of disparities/ inequity!

The world needs a solution to reduce the gap.

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History of Cartography: Volume One in PDF

History of Cartography: Volume One in PDF | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

Free access to the History of Cartography, Volume One, in PDF format.


Via Thierry Joliveau, Jérémie Ory
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Leoncio Lopez-Ocon's curator insight, January 21, 2014 3:40 PM

Acceso libre al primer volumen de la Historia de la Cartografía coordinada, entre otros, por J.B. Harley, en formato PDF

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How to Name a Scandal: What is a '- Gate' and What Is a '-Ghazi'?

How to Name a Scandal: What is a '- Gate' and What Is a '-Ghazi'? | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
mastermaq/FlickrTHE WATERGATE — Since a Washington hotel and office complex lent its name to the most important political crime in American history 40 years ago, "Watergate" has become synonymous with scandal.
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25 English Language Oddities - Listverse

25 English Language Oddities - Listverse | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Many cultures find that English might possibly be one of the most difficult languages to learn. Not, in fact, for its words, but for the fact that it has s

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Where In The World Is The Best Place For Healthy Eating?

Where In The World Is The Best Place For Healthy Eating? | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"The U.S. didn't even make the top 20, even though it has the greatest abundance of cheap food.". But cheap doesn't equal good!! Check out the list!


Via Allison Anthony
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Valentina González Tapiero's curator insight, January 15, 2014 10:04 PM

estos son los alimentos que nutren nuestro planeta.

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Here Are the Countries That Drink the Most Coffee (The U.S. Isn't in the Top 10)

Here Are the Countries That Drink the Most Coffee (The U.S. Isn't in the Top 10) | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Reuters
MORE FROM QUARTZ List: Everyone Attending Davos in 2014 Who Says China Is Borrowing Less?
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Coming of age in Japan

Coming of age in Japan | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Coming of Age Day icelebrates young people who have reached the age of 20, considered the age of maturity in Japan
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Virginia city may stop naming streets after Confederates

Virginia city may stop naming streets after Confederates | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Alexandria is considering repealing a 1963 law requiring streets to be named after Confederate generals
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No Old Maps Actually Say 'Here Be Dragons'

No Old Maps Actually Say 'Here Be Dragons' | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
But an ancient globe does.

Via Seth Dixon
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Bonnie Bracey Sutton's curator insight, December 17, 2013 9:27 PM

Of course we may not have copies of all old  and ancient maps… so who knows.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, June 18, 2014 11:47 AM

unit 1 map evolution

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What happens when people draw a map of the world from memory

What happens when people draw a map of the world from memory | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Can you draw a map of the world just from memory? And if you did, how accurate do you think your map would be? Probably not very.

Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 3, 2014 1:34 PM

Honestly, I don't think I could do much better (although I could nit-pick this to death).

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There She Blew! Volcanic Evidence Of The World's First Map

There She Blew! Volcanic Evidence Of The World's First Map | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Geologists have new evidence that a wall painting from 9,000-year-old ruins could be a map.

Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 10, 2014 11:15 AM

The NPR podcast discusses how a old mural with a birds-eye view of the village with a picture of a volcano (or so many assume).  The desire to graphically represent places with spatial renderings is amazing old interest. 

Bonnie Bracey Sutton's curator insight, January 10, 2014 11:52 AM

Awesome. the history of maps.. 

 

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Map: Vaccine-Preventable Outbreaks

Map: Vaccine-Preventable Outbreaks | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
The Global Health Program at the Council on Foreign Relations has been tracking news reports since 2008 to produce an interactive map that plots global outbreaks of diseases that are easily prevented by inexpensive and effective vaccines.

Via Seth Dixon, Mike Keevers
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Jessica Rieman's curator insight, January 28, 2014 1:21 PM

Alotyhough this information is open to the public it is very important to take into contex that many of Americans don't get vaccines theyb should every year but it is even worse in other countries and places in the world that dont have the accessibility that other well off countries have. The Global health aspect many outbreaks have happened because of lack of vaccinations and infected others in relation next to them. This causes an outbreak because of lack of vaccinations.

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, February 11, 2014 2:24 PM

While looking at thsi map it is apparent that whiloe looking at South America out of all the other nations on the map South America is the one with the least Vaccine-Preventable Outbreaks. What does this say about the Countinent as a whole? Well firstly if you look at Colombia there were 13 Measel outbreaks and 603 Whooping Cough outbreaks. Compare this to Eastern Brazil right on the coast only had measel's but the South of that were 1257 of Whooping Cough. In Equador there was the Measels and only measels at 326 cases. Why is the South of the Contenent drastiacally different then the rest of the Contenent and the rest of the world for that matter. No cases of Polio or Cholera whereas Africa had these apparent in large quantities.

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 2, 2014 5:53 PM

Egypt has had an overwhelming amout of outbreaks of the mumps and the total was 571 cases throughtout the years.

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Drying of the Aral Sea

Explore a global timelapse of our planet, constructed from Landsat satellite imagery. With water diverted to irrigation, the inland Aral Sea has shrunk drama...

Via Seth Dixon
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Kaitlin Young's curator insight, October 7, 2014 11:27 AM

The Aral Sea’s receding waters could prove fatal to the surrounding agriculture. Both Uzbekistan and Kazakhstan diverted the rivers that flowed into the Sea in the 1960s to feed their growing cotton and rice farms. Over the last five decades, the lack of a water source flowing into the Aral Sea combined with harsher droughts due to climate change have caused the water to evaporate at an alarming rate. As the water evaporates, large deposits of minerals remain on the bare lake bed. Winds pick up the mineral deposits and often spread them onto farms, where the increased salinity destroys rice paddies and other crops. The destruction of crops causes less food production, so less money is made by the farmers and more money has to be spent to bring in food to avoid famine. Cotton crops are also destroyed, so the region loses yet another source of income.

The increased evaporation of the Aral Sea has also caused an incredible increase to salinity levels in the lake itself. The extremely salty water cannot be used without heavy removing the salt, which is incredibly unaffordable in an already stressed region. Small subsidence farmers and local farmers cannot use the resource at hand. The fishing industry has completely collapsed, thus removing another important resource from the area.

If a wounded economy and unreliable food was not enough, the air born minerals blown away from the lake are causing numerous health problems. Respiratory issues, such as asthma, are becoming more and more common in the communities surrounding the Aral Sea due to the minerals and industrial debris in the air. The disappearance of the Sea has created the perfect conditions for the collapse of a region. The struggle that the people have to endure often escalates into increased social and political unrest, and disputes often occur. The Aral Sea exemplifies how one small environmental change can set off a chain of devastating events that lead to irreversible effects.

               

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, October 19, 2014 8:19 PM

The drying of the Aral Sea opens our eyes to how fragile our environment is and the scarcity of resources.  We need to become more aware of our resources, because as they saying goes, the "well will run dry."

Kevin Nguyen's curator insight, December 7, 2015 1:14 PM

The massive changes to the Aral Sea can clearly be seen through the course of a decade. It's so unbelievable that from 2000 on ward it shrunk significantly and the video also showed the development of agricultural land that surrounds the rivers feeding into the Sea. The more water being irrigated and are not putting into the Sea the more it dries up because the water is evaporated with little to no rain going back to it. This is definitely one of the worst man-made disaster that have happened to this region.

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In Flight: See the planes in the sky right now – an Interactive Visualization

In Flight: See the planes in the sky right now – an Interactive Visualization | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

Via Andreas Maniatis, Suvi Salo
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Andreas Maniatis's curator insight, January 21, 2014 11:57 AM

To mark 100 years of passenger air travel, our stunning interactive uses live data to show every one of the thousands of commercial planes currently in the air, charts the history of aviation since 1914, and asks what comes next for the industry.

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See These Rare Photos Of Remote Tribes Before They Disappear

See These Rare Photos Of Remote Tribes Before They Disappear | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
This photographer has celebrated their cultures in the most stunning way.

Via Jessica Robson Postlethwaite
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Leoncio Lopez-Ocon's curator insight, January 19, 2014 9:24 AM

Un fotógrafo capta  la diversidad humana en recónditos lugares del planeta

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What Happens When You Take an Obviously Viral Photo

What Happens When You Take an Obviously Viral Photo | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
About 5 hours ago, a woman named Amanda Traver was flying into LaGuardia airport, like so many other travelers.  As her plane descended, New York (and much of the eastern seaboard) was fogged in, as you can see in the Weather Channel map below: ...
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Phantom Drone Captures Beautiful Images Of Medieval French Castles, Monuments

Phantom Drone Captures Beautiful Images Of Medieval French Castles, Monuments | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Drones: They're not just for slaughtering people from the air and marketing gimmicks anymore. Researcher Max Nanao has used the evolving technology to photograph a series of historic castles, buildings and monuments in the South of France.

Via David R. Green, Mark P
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The great American pizza map(s)

The great American pizza map(s) | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Pizza is a big business in America. The two largest pizza companies in the country, Pizza Hut and Domino’s, accounted for $20 billion in sales in 2013, according to Pizza Today magazine (yes, there’s a Pizza Today magazine).
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40 more maps that explain the world

40 more maps that explain the world | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
I've searched wide and far for maps that can reveal and surprise and inform in ways that the daily headlines might not.

Via Seth Dixon
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Terheck's curator insight, January 26, 2014 5:58 AM

Une sélection de 40 cartes qui permettent de mieux comprendre notre monde.

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, February 11, 2014 2:30 PM

When looking at this map there area few things that stick out to me and not just the colors. Fistly what I founf interesting was that South America in relation to where we live is quite different. For example, The US economic status is High Class at $12195 or more for most of the East and West Coast and then it is dull in the middle. These facts compared to South America where they are mostly upper middle class at around $3946-12185 and a portion of them are the lower middle class which rings in at around $886-3945.

Jake Red Dorman's curator insight, November 13, 2014 2:39 PM

 On map 33, it shows the religious borders map of the different religions that are occupying certain areas of the Middle East. The area of Baghdad and east is mostly Shiite Islam and west of Baghdad is Sunni Islam. What I found to be most interesting is that even though Jerusalem is surrounded by many different religions they still celebrate Judaism. They are religiously protected by its borders. There is some sign of Sunni Islam being practices within their borders but it is mostly dominated by Judaism. 

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Crisis brewing in South Sudan

Crisis brewing in South Sudan | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Tens of thousands displaced by violence that erupted in South Sudan's capital Juba in mid-December
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A map of 19th Century shipping routes and nothing else

A map of 19th Century shipping routes and nothing else | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Nautical trade routes stretch like so many lengths of string in this arresting visualization of intercontinental commerce in the 1800s.

Via Seth Dixon
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The 13 Best Maps of 2013

The 13 Best Maps of 2013 | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Maps: Where would we be without them? This was banner year for beautiful, information-dense cartography, which provided a moment of self-reflection like a giant, geographic mirror.

Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 1, 2014 12:13 PM

Some of these are incredibly data rich and worth analyzing, and others are fluffy fun.

Siri Anderson's curator insight, January 22, 2014 8:26 AM

Awesome options for your collection.

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Michigan lighthouses after winter storm

Michigan lighthouses after winter storm | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
These stunning photographs were captured by U.S. photographer Thomas Zakowski, 56, on a trip to St Joseph, Michigan.

Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 7, 2014 10:22 AM

Just because the world can be a beautiful and terrifying place.