AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO
7.2K views | +2 today
Follow
AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks
Scoop.it!

Want the latest on Ukraine? Here’s what everyone said on Sunday.

Want the latest on Ukraine? Here’s what everyone said on Sunday. | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
The situation in Ukraine remains tense Sunday, as Russian forces have tightened their grip over Crimea, a week ahead of a vote in which the region will decide whether it wants to secede. Talk about what's next dominated the Sunday show conversation.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from retail and design
Scoop.it!

Can You Name the Famous Artists Who Inspired These Buildings?

Can You Name the Famous Artists Who Inspired These Buildings? | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Art and architecture collide in this playful new series of paintings by Federico Babina. What if Andy Warhol designed a mod apartment complex? Or Joan Miró a museum?

Via Brian Yanish - MarketingHits.com, Lola Ripollés
more...
Lola Ripollés's curator insight, March 8, 2014 9:09 PM

Just some fun for a Sunday. 

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from SoRo class
Scoop.it!

Lexical Distance Among the Languages of Europe

Lexical Distance Among the Languages of Europe | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

  This chart shows the lexical distance — that is, the degree of overall vocabulary divergence — among the major languages of Europe. The size of each circle represents the number of speakers ...

 

And yes, English has its deepest roots in German...the French aspects were tacked on after the Norman Conquest.


Via Seth Dixon, Clairelouise
more...
ethanrobert's curator insight, March 19, 2014 10:20 AM

This is a wonderful map that truly shows language families and their roots. In Europe, I was rather surprised when I seen that the Romance branch was much larger than that of the Germanic. All of the ancient Germanic groups such as the Jutes, Angols, and the Saxons were well versed in combat. Considering they conquered much of Western Europe, how is it that the Romance group is bigger than the Germanic? Also, in Eastern Europe, the Albanian language has no reason to exist. In a region dominated by the Slavic group with no environmental barriers, the Albanian language should not exist.~Ethan.

Arya Okten's curator insight, March 27, 2014 10:33 PM

Unit II

Ness Crouch's curator insight, March 28, 2014 8:43 PM

This isn't my normal area of interest but I found this fascinating!

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Human Geography is Everything!
Scoop.it!

Spoof on Agricultural Standards


Via Seth Dixon, Scarpaci Human Geography
more...
Josune Erkizia's curator insight, March 5, 2014 2:49 AM

Very funny

Marie-Ann Roberts's curator insight, March 5, 2014 3:51 AM

Good for sessions on Animal Welfare and Farm Assurance.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, September 11, 2014 2:07 PM

unit 5

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Mrs. Watson's Class
Scoop.it!

Our future in cities

Our future in cities | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Humanity's future is the future of cities. Explore the crowded favelas, greened-up blocks and futuristic districts that could shape the future of cities -- and take a profane, hilarious side trip to the suburbs.

Via Nancy Watson
more...
Nancy Watson's curator insight, March 5, 2014 8:08 PM

Cities are changing the world at a rapid rate.

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Classroom geography
Scoop.it!

Infographic - World's nuclear warhead stockpile

Infographic - World's nuclear warhead stockpile | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

Treaties have lowered the number of nuclear warheads since the end of the Cold War.


Via Mathijs Booden
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Design Without Borders
Scoop.it!

The most popular baby names of the 2013, visualized

The most popular baby names of the 2013, visualized | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

Wondering what the most popular baby names of last year were? Ok, probably not. But now that I mention it, seems like some cool trivia, right?


Via Mark P
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Cultural Geography
Scoop.it!

Two L.A. gang members are apparently fighting for Syria’s Assad

Two L.A. gang members are apparently fighting for Syria’s Assad | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
They identify themselves as Wino and Creeper in videos posted online but offer little indication of why they're in Syria.

 

Two Los Angeles gang members appear to have joined the flow of foreigners flocking to fight in Syria – in this instance, on the side of President Bashar al-Assad. In a video posted online, the two men boast that they are on the front lines and fire their guns in the direction of what they call "the enemigos."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Learning & Geography
Scoop.it!

Feeding Nine Billion | Working Towards A World With Food

Feeding Nine Billion | Working Towards A World With Food | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

Via Ann Marie Murnaghan
more...
Ann Marie Murnaghan's curator insight, March 7, 2014 2:45 PM

Really nice videos here!

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from ApocalypseSurvivalSkills
Scoop.it!

Crisis in the Crimea: The Showdown Between Ukraine and Russia

Crisis in the Crimea: The Showdown Between Ukraine and Russia | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon, ApocalypseSurvival
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 7, 2014 9:32 AM

This StoryMap from ESRI is a nice way to explore the current events in Crimea and this set of maps from National Geographic shows the historical geography of the region.   This issue has many inter-regional connections as well.  Many residents of former Soviet Republics are nervous seeing Russia's aggressive political strategy;  Moscow's previously similar foreign policy that aligned with Beijing's interests are now diverging

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from GHS Nature of Geography & Population Geography
Scoop.it!

Unit 1: How Capital Cities Distort Reality (Sense of Place)

Unit 1: How Capital Cities Distort Reality (Sense of Place) | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
What's lost when the only lens into a place is its major metropolis?

Via Mr Ortloff
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Classroom geography
Scoop.it!

Interactive map: Prevalence of baby names in the USA

Interactive map: Prevalence of baby names in the USA | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

Via Mathijs Booden
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Gambia president rejects English language

Gambia president rejects English language | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
President's decision to shift official language from English to local language comes months after its decision to withdraw from the Commonwealth

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, November 3, 2014 1:25 PM

Gambia does not want the English language to be the official language that is spoken anymore.  Noting that it reflects the UK and they don't believe that they and the UK have much in common especially on the platform of human rights.  Cutting the English language as the official language continues to cut ties with the UK.  One of the problems with this is if there are multiple local languages spoken in Gambia which one are they going to choose as the official language.  With this more problems are presented, those that do not know the local language that is chosen to be official will have to learn the new language quickly if they want to have any idea as to what is going on in their own country.

Kendra King's curator insight, March 15, 2015 6:32 PM

The president’s reaction is more than understandable. His country is in the midst of trying to heal after de-colonization. His actions show he is trying to cut out the west altogether. It is an extreme move, but if done correctly it could give the country a chance to start over to develop their own culture again. I think having a more local language could have the potential to unite the country. However, given the many dialects spoken in a typical African country, I do wonder what language will actually be chosen. If anything, there might have to be a few official languages so as to keep the peace among the population. Furthermore, English will still need to be learned. As much as Gambia may resent the United States or the UK those countries are too dominant. As such, the nation will have to do business with them or one of the many other countries that speak English. When this happens, English will be the expected language and not an African dialect because Africa doesn’t have the power to really negotiate its terms. Therefore, I think all this will end up being is a symbolic stand as the world is far to interconnected for Gambia to truly cut off ties with the western world permanently.  

 

I can also see where the president is coming from in regards to the human right’s issues as well. I am in no way condoning the countries handling of domestic affairs. I think a firing squad is outdated to say the least. However, being talked down to by a country who egregiously violated the population without ever really making amends is insulting. Furthermore, being reliant on their money is probably insufferable. I would say the country might need the money, but given how aid is improperly implemented in most foreign countries I don’t even think cutting them off matters much. Still, one might think that after experiencing such social injustice the leader would be a little more compassionate to its people. 

Aidan Lowery's curator insight, March 21, 2016 8:46 PM
unit 3
Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Mrs. Watson's Class
Scoop.it!

Revealing the Gap Between Men and Women Farmers - National Geographic

Revealing the Gap Between Men and Women Farmers - National Geographic | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
On International Women's Day, addressing inequalities can feed millions

Via Nancy Watson
more...
Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from URBAN FARMING
Scoop.it!

The science of healthy eating Seasonal eating

The science of healthy eating Seasonal eating | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Video: The benefits of eating fresh food in season

Via Evieira
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from GHS Political Geography
Scoop.it!

Did the Colonial Powers ever Really Leave Africa?

Did the Colonial Powers ever Really Leave Africa? | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Africa may have achieved independence, but the old colonial ties are still important as France’s decision to send troops to Mali to fight Islamist extremists shows.

Via Mr Ortloff
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from AP Human Geography at West High School
Scoop.it!

Namibia’s Spooky Skeleton Coast

Namibia’s Spooky Skeleton Coast | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
For centuries, a stretch of Africa's shore has lived up to its sinister name. From whales to ships to unlucky explorers, the Skeleton Coast has become the graveyard of many.

Via Jane Ellingson
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Mr. O'Hara US History
Scoop.it!

OPEC OIL EMBARGO - 1973 - YouTube

Share your videos with friends, family, and the world

Via John O'Hara
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from BAHS World Geography
Scoop.it!

Let's All Cool It With These Stupid Maps

Let's All Cool It With These Stupid Maps | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Maps are great. Maps help us get where we need to go and can sometimes teach us things about the world we live in. But unfortunately, the internet has been infected by a scourge of stupid maps. And stupid maps are making us dumber.

Via Timothy Roth
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from AP Human Geography
Scoop.it!

Shanghai's Global Ascendance

Shanghai's Global Ascendance | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

Reuters photographer Carlos Barria recently spent time in Shanghai, China, the fastest-growing city in the world. A week ago, he took this amazing shot, recreating the same framing and perspective as a photograph taken in 1987, showing what a difference 26 years can make. The setting is Shanghai's financial district of Pudong, dominated by the Oriental Pearl Tower at left, and the new 125-story Shanghai Tower, China's tallest building and the world's second tallest skyscraper, at 632 meters (2,073 ft) high, scheduled to finish by the end of 2014. Shanghai, the largest city by population in the world, has been growing at a rate of about 10 percent a year the past 20 years, and now is home to 23.5 million people -- nearly double what it was back in 1987. This entry is focused on this single photo pairing, with several ways to compare the two.


Via Seth Dixon, Jane Ellingson, Dustin Fowler
more...
Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 15, 2014 12:38 PM

It is amazing how quick a city can change in only 26 years. Since this picture was taken in 1987, the city's population has doubled, and is continuing to grow rapidly. Today, this city is one of the largest in the world and has magnificent skyscrapers, one of which is the second tallest in the world. It is obvious globalization hit this mega city very quickly, making it one of the most impressive cities in the world. 

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 9:37 PM

Buildings, skyscrapers and urbanization. Why not? This is how the world is and this is what attacks tourists. For Shanghai, they need to be up to par with all the other business and tech savvy countries and cities. This is how they are going to keep their technological business, by building what needs to be built. 

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, September 11, 2014 2:16 PM

unit 7

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Horn APHuG
Scoop.it!

World's Most Dangerous Job - Human Planet - BBC - YouTube

“ On the Indonesian island of Java, men mine sulphur from inside Ljen Volcano. It's crater is filled with a mix of highly toxic gases, that have claimed the li...”


Via Matt Richardson, Greg Hill
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Global Affairs & Human Geography Digital Knowledge Source
Scoop.it!

Russia sanctions: Why the U.S. and Europe are not quite in step

Russia sanctions: Why the U.S. and Europe are not quite in step | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
The United States and Europe have reacted against Russia's military intervention in the Crimean peninsula last week with threats of economic punishments. But their positions are slightly different. Here's why.

Via Allison Anthony
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Love of Geography
Scoop.it!

Russia's Invasion of Crimea Is So Shocking Because it's a Return to a Now Rare Form of Warfare

Russia's Invasion of Crimea Is So Shocking Because it's a Return to a Now Rare Form of Warfare | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

It seems like one reason why Russia’s actions in Crimea appear so jarring and brazen is that it’s a form of warfare that was once common but rarely take place anymore. Russia may not formally annex Crimea – it seems more likely that the territory will declare independence under heavy Russian influence – but it has essentially invaded another country to lob off a piece of territory that was, despite longstanding nationalist sentiment, an undisputed part of Ukraine.

 

Historically speaking, conflicts in which one country sends troops into the territory to take over a disputed region are pretty common. But today, interstate war is relatively rare, and interstate wars over control of territory even rarer. For the most part, conflicts today usually take place between armed groups within states, and when one country does send troops into another – the U.S. in Iraq and Afghanistan, for instance – it’s generally under the assumption that sooner or later they will pull out, leaving borders as they are.


Via Seth Dixon, Kevin Barker
more...
mapsdotcom's curator insight, March 3, 2014 11:55 AM

Is this dispute set to permanently alter borders?

Albert Jordan's curator insight, March 6, 2014 3:07 PM

If Rust Cohle of HBO's fantastic hit show "True Detective" is to be believed, then life is a flat circle and we are doomed to repeat our lives over and over again. Hopefully, for the optimist in us, this is not true or we may be looking at a return to an old school version of warfare as this article points out. We have seen a departure from this type of warfare because the only sovereign power necessarily strong enough to do it has been the United States. However, the U.S. is not in a position it once was. While still an undeniable super power, it has found itself strained economically and resource wise. Its international image has been damaged by long, drawn out conflicts in Iraq & Afghanistan. Not only that but the U.S. is not really a territory hungry nation. While the country may or may not use diplomatic, economic, and/or other covert/overt means to sway other countries to side with them so they can consume their resources, it is not grabbing up territory; depending on how you view U.S. military base placement. Which, Russia is obviouslly concerned with in Crimea.

The problem, though, is that there is only a certain amount of territory to control on the planet. Either you have it already or your neighbor does and when you need access to strategic waterways, landways, or natural resources you either must take what you want or need. Aside from taking by force or coercion, Russia does not have many other means to acquire what it wants - which is slightly terrifying as they still wield significant military might and not to mention, a large stockpile of nuclear weapons. Luckily for Russia, its neighbors and former Soviet Bloc members are not much of a match for them and are easy conquests should the former USSR decide to go back to a Cold War era stand off with the U.S. and its allies. Much of the world is not willing to go to armed conflict with their neighbors for territory as it will attract the attention of the world powers. The only feasible way it may seem for strong enough nations to expand their global borders is for an all out map changing war to break out. Which, unfortunately, would be a return to an old school style of warfare. Life is a flat circle, indeed.

Kevin Barker's curator insight, March 8, 2014 8:59 AM

When was the last time a country was invaded with the intent of acquiring a large piece of land?