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Crimea, the Tinderbox

Crimea, the Tinderbox | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
The West and Russia have a common interest: forestalling civil war in Ukraine.

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Allison Anthony's curator insight, March 2, 2014 3:57 PM

This is a great history of the region and a scary picture reminiscent of Hitler in 1938!

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AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO
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GeoGuessr - Let's explore the world!

GeoGuessr - Let's explore the world! | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
GeoGuessr is a geography game which takes you on a journey around the world and challenges your ability to recognize your surroundings.

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Edelin Espino's curator insight, September 10, 2014 2:31 PM

This is a really cool game! You should play it.

Allison Henley's curator insight, September 10, 2014 2:35 PM

Very addicting even though I'm not that great at it!! haha

Matleena Laakso's curator insight, October 5, 2014 4:55 AM

Tämä on hauska, muutaman kerran on tullut "pelattua".

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Visualized: How the insane amount of rain in Texas could turn Rhode Island into a lake

Visualized: How the insane amount of rain in Texas could turn Rhode Island into a lake | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"It's difficult to comprehend the ridiculous amounts of water that have fallen in such a short time in a state that, until recently, had been in the grip of a historic drought. But one place to start would be to look at reservoir levels in the state. In the past 30 days, Texas reservoirs have gone from being 73 percent full to 82 percent full, according to data maintained by the Texas Water Development board. All told, about 8 million acre-feet of water have flowed into the state's reservoirs."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 28, 8:44 AM

Just how much of water is 8 million acre-feet?  It's almost impossible for most people to visualize that, but this series of graphics is designed to put the scale of the recent flooding in Texas into perspective (and yes, I love that Rhode Island is almost a unit of measurement).

  

Tags: water, fluvial, perspective, scale, Rhode Island.

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Postcards of World War I

Postcards of World War I | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Home page of the South Dakota State Historical Society, Pierre, S.D. An office within the Department of Tourism and Economic Development, the Society manages five programs-- archaeology, archives, historic preservation, museum, and research and publishing.

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David McMullen's curator insight, May 18, 9:23 PM

over 90 postcard images of World War I 

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The case for engineering our food

Pamela Ronald studies the genes that make plants more resistant to disease and stress. In an eye-opening talk, she describes her decade-long quest to help create a variety of rice that can survive prolonged flooding. She shows how the genetic improvement of seeds saved the Hawaiian papaya crop in the 1950s — and makes the case that it may simply be the most effective way to enhance food security for our planet’s growing population.

 

Tags: GMOs, technology, agriculture.


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MsPerry's curator insight, May 27, 9:27 AM

Ag Unit

Eden Eaves's curator insight, May 27, 12:57 PM

Pamela Ronald studies the genes that make plants more resistant to disease and stress. In an eye-opening talk, she describes her decade-long quest to help create a variety of rice that can survive prolonged flooding. She shows how the genetic improvement of seeds saved the Hawaiian papaya crop in the 1950s — and makes the case that it may simply be the most effective way to enhance food security for our planet’s growing population.

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Historic Aerial Mapper

Historic Aerial Mapper | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

This map is a great archive of historic satellite imagery of the Ocean State, with a special nod to Providence. 

 


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HDI over time in Central America

HDI over time in Central America | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"Explore public data through Google's visualization tools." 


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Savannah Rains's curator insight, May 27, 1:41 AM

This HDI model is showing rankings of Central America. The HDI combines stats like life expectancy, education, and per capita income and compares countries to one another. This is an interesting graph to observe ans study because people should be able to have the knowledge of their country compared to others and where places lie in comparison to their neighboring countries. 

MsPerry's curator insight, May 27, 9:28 AM

Population Unit

Gareth Jukes's curator insight, May 27, 1:05 PM

Human Development Index-

This article explains how more and more countries in Central America are becoming more developed and have higher HDI. This helps create better views on Central America, thus giving it better chances via trade with other countries.

 

This article demonstrates the idea of HDI by showing the actual HDI's in Central America, and how most countries are increasing overall.

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You did such a wonderful thing: Huge surprise for hero Sikh man

Harman Singh defied the rules of his religion to help an injured young boy.

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MsPerry's curator insight, May 27, 9:29 AM

Religion

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World's largest hotel coming to Mecca

World's largest hotel coming to Mecca | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Abraj Kudai, a complex in Mecca, Saudi Arabia, is set to become the world's largest hotel by room count when it opens in 2017.

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Quentin Sylvester's curator insight, May 27, 12:06 AM

Globalization has had major effects on religions like Islam, where followers are expected to make the Hajj to Mecca every year. With planes and global technology helping millions more Muslims accomplish this each year, Mecca, the cultural hearth and center of the Hajj has to compensate for this with major construction projects to provide rooming for the many Muslims that make the Hajj; like this new hotel being built.

Caitlyn Christiansen's curator insight, May 27, 12:12 AM

Currently, four out of the five largest hotels in the world are located in Los Vegas, Nevada. But, plans have been made to build the Abraj Kudai in Mecca, Saudi Arabia with 10,000 rooms, 70 restaurants, several helipads, a full sized convention center, a mall, and a bus station just a short distance from Mecca's Holy Mosque. This hotel will take advantage of the yearly hajj to Mecca and the Muslims who triple the city's population annually.

 

This article is related to cities and urban land use through the use of sacred sites to define the location of goods and services, in this case a hotel, for maximum profit. sacred sites help to define a city and give it part of its attractive appeal and create pull factors.

Shane C Cook's curator insight, May 27, 3:20 AM

Hmm it seems hot deserts hold the greatest things. Las Vegas will soon no longer have the largest hotel, with over 6000 rooms. I wonder how this will play out during the next hajj. Will the people love Abraj Kudai or hate it because of its expensiveness?

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13 maps about America worth bringing up at dinner parties and/or first dates

Did you know that Texas' economy is the same size as Australia's? Now tell your date.

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Nancy Watson's curator insight, May 20, 8:33 PM

You gotta love how maps can be a wealth of information (#1)

 

 

Caitlyn Christiansen's curator insight, May 26, 5:43 PM

The United States is a very interesting country. This article uses 13 unique maps that make a statement about America and its history, the way the individual states compare to one another, and comparing the US to the rest of the world, whether spatially, socially, economically, or demographically.

 

This article relates to the political organization of space through the political differences that are drawn clearly on comparing states GDPs, size or population to other countries or to each other. How the space is organized depends on these factors, yet is almost independent depending on the state.

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Adventures in mapping: 12 TED Talks

Adventures in mapping: 12 TED Talks | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Maps don’t just tell you which street to turn left on. See what we mean, below.

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Nancy Watson's curator insight, May 17, 7:36 AM

Maps can tell you much more than direction. Love TED Talks

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This mesmerizing map shows the world's buses and trains moving in real time

Swiss-German IT firm GeOps has collaborated with the University of Freiburg on an interactive map of the world's major mass transit systems, incorporating public data feeds (like the MTA's) offered...

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Suvi Salo's curator insight, May 16, 10:17 PM

via Random

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How to Make an Attractive City

We've grown good at making many things in the modern world - but strangely the art of making attractive cities has been lost. Here are some key principles for how to make attractive cities once again.

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Seth Forman's curator insight, May 26, 6:57 PM

Summary: This interesting video talks about principles that should be considered by city planners that could make our life's better and happier.

 

Insight: This video is relevant  to unit 7 because it shows efforts that should be taken by urban planners and how a simple city layout can effect our lives. 

Emerald Pina's curator insight, May 27, 1:01 AM

This video gives you an overview of how to make the most attractive city in six ways. It explains the reasons and the wants of a city that potential residents are looking for.

 

This video relates to Unit 7: Cities and Urban Land Use because it talks about the orgin, site and situation a city should have for it to be considered attractive to people. A city should be chaotic/ordered, should have visible life, compact, is should have a nice/mysterious orientation, it should not be too big or too small, and it should be local and lively. Today, many cities lack attractiveness because of the intellectual confusion around beauty and the lack of political will. I totally agree with video and the requirement s to have an attrative city. 

Shane C Cook's curator insight, May 27, 4:17 AM

We definitely need more visually pleasing cities, our world is lacking and we are loosing it to like in the video "corporate opportunists".

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Do We Talk Funny? 51 American Colloquialisms - NPR

Do We Talk Funny? 51 American Colloquialisms - NPR | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
American English has a rich history of regionalisms — which sometimes tell us a lot about where we come from.

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High Def Earth

NASA Commentator Dan Huot talks with David Hornyak, the project manager of the High Definition Earth Viewing experiment, about the first year of the project’s operation and screens some of its memorable scenes. From a perch on the nadir side of the International Space Station’s Columbus module, HDEV’s four high definition off-the-shelf video cameras have been transmitting clear, sharp views of Earth from an altitude of 250 miles, providing impressive views while testing how the hardware holds up in the harsh environment of Earth orbit.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 12, 8:24 AM

If you are impatient, the 'highlight reel' of this high definition video begins at 3:50 in this clip (but understanding the 'behind-the-scenes' context helps to understand how we get these videos of our planet). 


Tags: mapping, perspective, images, remote sensing, geospatial, unit 1 Geoprinciples.

LEONARDO WILD's curator insight, May 28, 9:12 AM

No matter how High Def these images are, how many geopolitical frontier lines can be viewed? The ones that stand out, are where political and economic practices have visible degraded the environment in one country, and not in the other. Otherwise, it's all still one planet for all.

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Incredible Color Video Shows Life in Berlin at the End of WWII - ArchDaily

May 8th marks the 70-year anniversary of the end of World War II in Europe, when Germany’s Third Reich surrendered to the Allied forces. To


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▶ Mansa Musa, one of the wealthiest people who ever lived - TED-Ed

Published on May 18, 2015
Mansa Musa, the 14th century African king of the Mali Empire, is said to have amassed a fortune that possibly made him one of the wealthiest people who ever lived. Jessica Smith tells the story of how Mansa Musa literally put his empire – and himself – on the map.


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India heatwave kills 800 as capital's roads melt

India heatwave kills 800 as capital's roads melt | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"At least 800 people have died in a major heatwave that has swept across India, melting roads in New Delhi as temperatures neared 50 degrees Celsius (122 Fahrenheit).  Hospitals are on alert to treat victims of heatstroke and authorities advised people to stay indoors with no end in sight to the searing conditions.  In the worst-hit state of Andhra Pradesh, in the south, 551 people have died in the past week as temperatures hit 47 degrees Celsius on Monday." 

 

Tags: physical, weather and climate, India, South Asia.


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 27, 8:51 AM

This article on MSN and this NPR podcast remind me about how extremes can create chaos.  While in Texas, the flooding has ravaged much of the state.  Weather from other places is never news unless it is so extreme that it becomes a crisis.   

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France Declares All New Rooftops Must Be Topped With Plants Or Solar Panels | CSGlobe

France Declares All New Rooftops Must Be Topped With Plants Or Solar Panels | CSGlobe | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
A new law recently passed in France mandates that all new buildings that are built in commercial zones in France must be partially covered in either plants

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Orsolya Serfőző's curator insight, May 27, 8:20 AM

Great idea!

christian's curator insight, May 27, 9:35 AM

Unit 5: land use

This article mainly tells you how France is trying to be "greener" by passing a law that says "all new buildings in commercial zones must be partially covered in either plants or solar panels" 

This article ties into unit 5 by showing how the french lawmakers are making their commercial zones more efficient and healthier by having the greenery and or solar panels on the top of buildings. 

Molly McComb's curator insight, May 27, 11:36 AM

Global use of fossil fuels has decreased due to the increase of alternative energy sources. With this, France passed a new law that in commercial or urban zones rooftops must be partially covered in plants or solar panes. These roofs help reduce the amount of money needed to heat building in the winter and cool it in the summer. If the global population continued to increase the use of these green roofs, the amount of fossil fuels will continue to reduce. 

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The Precision Agriculture Revolution

The Precision Agriculture Revolution | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"Thousands of years ago, agriculture began as a highly site-specific activity. The first farmers were gardeners who nurtured individual plants, and they sought out the microclimates and patches of soil that favored those plants. But as farmers acquired scientific knowledge and mechanical expertise, they enlarged their plots, using standardized approaches—plowing the soil, spreading animal manure as fertilizer, rotating the crops from year to year—to boost crop yields. Over the years, they developed better methods of preparing the soil and protecting plants from insects and, eventually, machines to reduce the labor required. Starting in the nineteenth century, scientists invented chemical pesticides and used newly discovered genetic principles to select for more productive plants. Even though these methods maximized overall productivity, they led some areas within fields to underperform. Nonetheless, yields rose to once-unimaginable levels: for some crops, they increased tenfold from the nineteenth century to the present.  

Today, however, the trend toward ever more uniform practices is starting to reverse, thanks to what is known as 'precision agriculture.' Taking advantage of information technology, farmers can now collect precise data about their fields and use that knowledge to customize how they cultivate each square foot."

 

Tags: technology, food production, agriculture, agribusiness, spatial, GPS.


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MsPerry's curator insight, May 27, 9:29 AM

Ag Unit

Gareth Jukes's curator insight, May 27, 11:52 AM

Development and diffusion of agriculture-

This article explains how agriculture has developed and grown for thousands of years, and today with our technology, we can do what seemed impossible to the past peoples.

This article represents Development and Diffusion of Agriculture by showing how in our past years, we could mostly only do substinence agriculture, but today with technology, we can do so much more, with so much less people.

Gareth Jukes's curator insight, May 27, 11:59 AM

Land use/land cover change: irrigation, desertification, deforestation, wetland destruction, conservation efforts to protect or restore natural land cover, and global impacts-

This article explains how today we have the best technology we have ever created agriculture-wise, but with this, more land has been used. But thanks to precision agriculture, we can use data to determine where we can use the least amount of raw materials needed, thus helping protect more land than before.

 This article demonstrates land use/land cover change: irrigation, desertification, deforestation, wetland destruction, conservation efforts to protect or restore natural land cover, and global impacts by showing how with the technology today and precision farming, we can use less raw materials than ever before, thus helping lessen global impact.

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Vandals destroy dam, release 49 million gallons of water into Bay

Vandals destroy dam, release 49 million gallons of water into Bay | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Fremont police say vandals attacked an inflatable dam on Alameda Creek that resulted in the loss of nearly 50 million gallons of water.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 23, 10:11 AM

Because what's more fun than losing nearly 50 millions gallons of freshwater during a drought?  The selfishness of some can be so disheartening for the rest of the community. 

Stephen Zimmett's curator insight, May 26, 1:28 PM

I saw this on RT the other  day

Shane C Cook's curator insight, May 27, 3:12 AM

It is a real shame that people in general would react to the drought this way especially when conditions are extreme. My guess would be that the vandals had a goal not just mess around. Maybe it was a message to the city of Freemont, we will have to see in the future.

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Customizable Maps of Mexico

Customizable Maps of Mexico | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"Find worksheets about Geography of Mexico.  Hundreds of worksheets--millions of combinations."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 22, 9:58 PM

One of the problems with so many outline maps for classroom use is that, depending on your lesson plan, you might want it labeled, showing surrounding countries or in color...but maybe not.  This site let's you customize these simple maps that are perfect for the K-12 classroom (and yes, they have maps for all regions of the world).  


Tags: Mexico, K12, map, map archives

MsPerry's curator insight, May 27, 9:30 AM

Maps

Jacob McCullough's curator insight, May 27, 10:06 AM

this is just a quick highlight of the geography of mexico in all its aspects 

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A Puzzle That Takes You Around The Globe - NPR

A Puzzle That Takes You Around The Globe - NPR | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Every answer is the name of a country. For each word given, ignore the vowels. The consonants, in order from left to right, are the same consonants in the same order as in the country.
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Venice's Gondoliers Make Room For Wheelchairs

Venice's Gondoliers Make Room For Wheelchairs | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
A group of gondoliers in Venice have banded together to come up with a way for people in wheelchairs to enjoy that most Venetian of experiences.
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Henderson Waves: A Pedestrian Bridge Envisioned for Singapore

Henderson Waves: A Pedestrian Bridge Envisioned for Singapore | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

Arising from an international bridge design competition, Henderson Waves and other connections form part of a nine kilometer stretch of leisure destination that urban planners have envisioned for in the south of Singapore. This tallest pedestrian bridge and other elevated walkways creatively link up hills, parks and attractions to extend the green and recreational spaces available, bringing people closer to nature. 
Designed by RSP Architects Planners & Engineers Pte Ltd and IJP Corporation (UK), the 274 meter long bridge springs from a scenic location off Mount Faber to Telok Blangah. At 36 meters above Henderson Road, the bridge flows organically in seven wave spans, echoing the ridges’ profiles.


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Lola Ripollés's curator insight, May 16, 4:27 PM

La belleza de un puente peatonal de une parque y atracciones en una zona de ocio de Singapur.

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10 truly absurd features of contemporary geopolitics

10 truly absurd features of contemporary geopolitics | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"The U.N. Security Council. What’s Up With That?  And 9 other truly absurd features of contemporary geopolitics."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 8, 11:32 AM

"Some of these absurdities persist because they’ve been around a long time, or because powerful interests defend them vigorously, or because they align with broader social prejudices. Some of them may in fact be defensible, but we should still bring such oddities out into the open air on occasion and ask ourselves if they really make sense."


Tags: political, geopolitics.

LEONARDO WILD's curator insight, May 14, 9:13 AM

Absurdity is in the eyes of the beholder ... if the beholder doesn't understand what's behind the actions and behaviors of those who, in this case, are the face of the powers that move the world. The veil of absurdity gets lifted immediately when you take a look at the economic motivations and interconnections, as well as at the fact that politics is the Petri Dish of psychopathy—Look up: Political Ponerology, the subject matter of my new novel: THE GALAPAGOS AGENDA, coming out soon with Suspense Publishing (e-Book) and Story Merchants Books (print).

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5 Themes of Geography Notes animations


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Rich Schultz's curator insight, May 15, 4:57 PM

Gotta know those 5 themes of geography!