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Precipitation Mapping

Precipitation Mapping | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon, Malmci@Spatialzone
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 21, 2013 3:32 PM

In New Hampshire they are doing great work to make mapping data useful in the classroom.  This site is one that they use to show how students can map locally relevant data from an online data set.  CoCoRaHS (Community Collaborative Rain, Hail & Snow Network)  is a crowd-sourced network that gathers North American precipitation data.  The data (especially the total precipitation summary) can be easily copied into as spread sheet and saved as a CSV file (which can be uploaded to ArcGIS online).


Tagsmapping, CSV, water, GISESRIgeography education, geospatial, edtech.

Edelin Espino's curator insight, September 30, 2014 9:42 PM

This is  COCORAHS. people from different places put this measurement tools to measure the rain fall, and it is different everywhere. this is cool in my opinion.

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GeoGuessr - Let's explore the world!

GeoGuessr - Let's explore the world! | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
GeoGuessr is a geography game which takes you on a journey around the world and challenges your ability to recognize your surroundings.

Via Seth Dixon
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Edelin Espino's curator insight, September 10, 2014 2:31 PM

This is a really cool game! You should play it.

Allison Henley's curator insight, September 10, 2014 2:35 PM

Very addicting even though I'm not that great at it!! haha

Matleena Laakso's curator insight, October 5, 2014 4:55 AM

Tämä on hauska, muutaman kerran on tullut "pelattua".

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Food Waste

Producers, sellers, and consumers waste tons of food. John Oliver discusses the shocking amount of food we don’t eat.

Via Seth Dixon
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Anna Hoppe's curator insight, Today, 12:21 PM

Food waste is a tragedy that we all know happens, but the economic system does not work efficiently to maximize the global food production (Disclaimer: it is HBO's John Oliver, so there is some language and references that might not be appropriate for all audiences). 


Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, sustainability, video, unit 5 agriculture.

StacyOstrom's curator insight, Today, 12:27 PM

Food waste is a tragedy that we all know happens, but the economic system does not work efficiently to maximize the global food production (Disclaimer: it is HBO's John Oliver, so there is some language and references that might not be appropriate for all audiences). 


Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, sustainability, video, unit 5 agriculture.

bridget rosolanka's curator insight, Today, 12:32 PM

Food waste is a tragedy that we all know happens, but the economic system does not work efficiently to maximize the global food production (Disclaimer: it is HBO's John Oliver, so there is some language and references that might not be appropriate for all audiences). 


Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, sustainability, video, unit 5 agriculture.

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Picturing England : photographs of English life

Picturing England : photographs of English life | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
From egg gatherers in Yorkshire to the Holborn viaduct under construction, a book by the Historic England Archive brings together photos dating from 1850

Via Monica MIRZA, Marga Roig, Suvi Salo
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Monica MIRZA's curator insight, July 29, 12:48 PM

Remembrances of the past, history... these pictures will also illustrate EFL lessons and prompt your students' speech.

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25 Unbelievable Things You Didn’t Know About Language And Linguistics

Language is one of those things that most of us take for granted, and like most things that we take for granted it's actually a lot cooler than we could imagine.

Via Dean J. Fusto, Aki Puustinen, Suvi Salo
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Answer: Time zone eccentricities

Answer: Time zone eccentricities | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Once again, the reality is more complex... 
... than I thought.  If you're like me, you thought that there might be as many as 24 time zones.  You probably knew that China was all one giant time zone, and that Newfoundland (Canada) was a bit odd.

Via KEpps
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World population projection map

World population projection map | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
This interactive graphic explores the United Nations' projected populations of countries through the 21st century.

Via Clare Kinnane
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Dustin Fowler's curator insight, July 28, 9:40 AM

Perfect for explaining population growth, and the relationship between population growth and low development.  Also, would serve as a good lead in to teaching population pyramids.  http://populationpyramid.net/

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Why are we so reliant on air conditioning? (It's not just climate change, it's bad design)

Why are we so reliant on air conditioning? (It's not just climate change, it's bad design) | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Air conditioners have made architects lazy, and we've forgotten how to design houses that might work without it.

 

A hundred years ago, a house in Florida looked different than a house in New England. The northern house might be boxy, have relatively small windows, almost always two stories with low ceilings, and a big fireplace in the middle. 

In Florida, the house might have high ceilings, tall double-hung windows, and deep porches. Trees would be planted around the house to block the sun. 

Today, houses pretty much look the same wherever you go in North America, and one thing made this possible: central air conditioning. Now, the United States uses more energy for air conditioning than 1 billion people in Africa use for everything.

 

Tags: planning, architecture, housing, urban, place, environment adapt, energy, consumption.


Via Seth Dixon, Christopher L. Story
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 21, 12:44 PM

The recent demographic shift to the "Sun Belt" in the U.S.  coincides with the mass availability of air conditioning (among other factors).  Our homes are less regionally distinct and in terms of the human/environmental interactions, our answer is greater modifications as opposed to regional adaptations...this article is a call for more architectural improvements instead of more energy consumption to beat the heat.  In Europe however, they see the United States as "over air-conditioned" in the summer.

UCCE Sonoma County's curator insight, July 22, 11:13 AM

This makes sense...

Stephen Zimmett's curator insight, July 23, 1:12 PM

A GOOD STORY ABOUT AIR CONDITIONING

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The World According to China

The World According to China | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
China’s enormous overseas spending has helped it displace the United States and Europe as the leading financial power in large parts of the developing world.

Via Suvi Salo
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10 Countries That May Not Survive The Next 20 Years - YouTube

10 Countries That May Not Survive The Next 20 Years - The future is uncertain, some countries may not survive another two decades. Join us on our speculative...

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Nancy Watson's curator insight, July 15, 12:20 PM

Interesting look at states that have the potential to break up or gain more sovern 

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Urbanization in China

China's citizens are moving from the countryside into cities in record numbers, boosting the economy but making party leaders uneasy

 

Tags: economic, planning, urban, China, East Asia.


Via Seth Dixon
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Nicholas Vargas's curator insight, July 16, 11:30 AM

China is urbanizing rapidly, but at what cost?

 

How is this impacting China's citizens, specifically those that have been relocated?

François Arnal's curator insight, July 17, 4:15 AM
Seth Dixon's insight:

A big portion of China's economic boom the last few decades has been linked to the transformation of what used to be a predominantly agrarian civilization to an economic engine fueled by rapid urbanization.  This 2011 video from the Economist is still highly relevant today.   

 

@Céline

Vincent Lahondère's curator insight, July 18, 9:02 AM

ajouter Votre perspicacité ...

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American Curses, Mapped

American Curses, Mapped | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"Americans love to curse. The question is, which bad words are favored where? Who says “*#@&” the most? Who says “$%*#” the least? Is there a “*#$” belt? (As it turns out, yes: From New York City down to the Gulf Coast.)"

 

Tags: language, culture, diffusion, popular culture, mapping, regions.


Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 16, 11:05 PM

If you don't want to hear potty talk, this is not the set of maps on linguistic geography for you...I'm just sayin', you've been forewarned.  An isogloss is a line that separates regions that use different words for the same object/concept.  Thing of isoglosses as linguistic contour lines...are there any swearing isoglosses?  Swearing regions?     

Jamie Strickland's comment, July 21, 3:03 PM
I f-ing love this!
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Photos Capture The Joy On Playgrounds Around The World

Photos Capture The Joy On Playgrounds Around The World | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
From the U.K. to Kenya to the West Bank, photographer James Mollison exposes not only inequalities among rich and poor countries, but also the intimate moments that unfold during recess.

Via Allison Anthony, Jukka Melaranta, Suvi Salo
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Paul's curator insight, July 14, 8:51 AM

excellent idea - why do we allow our children to play in spaces like this? 

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Stats that reshape your world-view

With the drama and urgency of a sportscaster, statistics guru Hans Rosling uses an amazing new presentation tool, Gapminder, to present data that debunks several myths about world development. Rosling is professor of international health at Sweden's Karolinska Institute, and founder of Gapminder, a nonprofit that brings vital global data to life.

Via Seth Dixon, Aki Puustinen
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 23, 3:01 PM

It is never a bad time to hear from Hans Rosling.  In this TED talk he shares data that shows how popular myths about the less developed world (especially fertility rates and life expectancy) have radically changed in the last 40 years.


Tags: gapminder, development, TED.

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What If Africa Was a Bar?

What If Africa Was a Bar? | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
A bar in Madagascar (Siphiwe Sibeko / Reuters) There’s something maddeningly reductive, but also surprisingly instructive, about trying to sum up a country, a complex collective of thousands or millions of people, in just a few words.
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MIT Technology Review: LIDAR archaeology shines light on Ancient Sites

MIT Technology Review: LIDAR archaeology shines light on Ancient Sites | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Airborne laser scanning has revealed the remnants of a vast urban structure in the vicinity of Angkor Wat, a famous temple in Cambodia. The study, which will be published soon in the journal PNAS, follows a previous one that showed Angkor Wat to h...

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Geography plays a role in early cancer diagnosis - ConsumerAffairs

Geography plays a role in early cancer diagnosis - ConsumerAffairs | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Whether or not someone survives cancer often depends on when the disease is diagnosed. If it is caught early then the odds are better, but a late-stage dia

Via Christopher L. Story
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12 traditional dances from around the world

12 traditional dances from around the world | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Whether you're synchronized in Mongolia or twirling in Turkey, Gloria Estefan's words still ring true: The rhythm is gonna get you

Via iC Merici, Marga Roig, Suvi Salo
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The challenges of finding love in China

The challenges of finding love in China | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
A country of 1.3 billion people means a lot of possibilities, and a lot of competition. Seth Doane reports on the many ways the Chinese go searching for love - from dating apps and parents aggressively promoting their sons or daughters, to the professional "love hunters" who scour shopping malls for eligible matches for their clients. Originally broadcast February 15, 2015.
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The Earthquake That Will Devastate Seattle

The Earthquake That Will Devastate Seattle | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
When the giant fault line along the Pacific Northwest ruptures, it could be our worst natural disaster ever.

 

The Cascadia subduction zone remained hidden from us for so long because we could not see deep enough into the past. It poses a danger to us today because we have not thought deeply enough about the future. The Cascadia situation, a calamity in its own right, is also a parable for this age of ecological reckoning, and the questions it raises are ones that we all now face. How should a society respond to a looming crisis of uncertain timing but of catastrophic proportions? How can it begin to right itself when its entire infrastructure and culture developed in a way that leaves it profoundly vulnerable to natural disaster?


Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 15, 10:34 AM

This is a long read but well worth the time. "The really big one," an earthquake in the Pacific Northwest over 8.0, last happened in 1700, but seismologists know that the geological pressure on the fault lines have been building since then.  This in not a panic-inducing article, but one reminding people that the most potent natural disasters operate on cycles much longer than our lifetimes.    


Tags: disasters, physical, tectonics.

John Flatley's curator insight, July 28, 5:54 PM

A longer than normal read, but pretty un-nerving for people located in this area.  

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World Literacy Map: Literacy Rate Adult Total of People Ages 15 and Above

World Literacy Map: Literacy Rate Adult Total of People Ages 15 and Above | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Percentage of a country's population that can read and write. Country's define literacy age between 7 and 20 years old. The standard age for literacy most countries is 15 years of age.

 

Tags: education, K12, development, map, worldwide.


Via Seth Dixon, Clairelouise
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 1, 1:16 PM

My 10 year-old daughter was looking in our atlas a while back (yes, she is my daughter) and in the encyclopedic entry of each country she started noticing that literacy rates were included.  She started asking about which regions had higher and lower literacy rates. This became a teaching moment about the power of the map--I explained that all this data can be more easily accessed and seen on a map and this interactive map is what we discovered.  We need to help student find the maps and data to answer their questions (and we need to make sure that they are curious enough to ask questions about the way the world works).  

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Island in a Lake on an Island in a Lake on an Island

Island in a Lake on an Island in a Lake on an Island | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"Here’s a winning question for your next trivia night: Where is the world’s largest island-in-a-lake-on-an-island-in-a-lake-on-an-island? According to stories published here and here, the distinction currently goes to a nameless isle within Victoria Island in Canada’s Nunavut Territory.

On August 21, 2014, the Operational Land Imager (OLI) on Landsat 8 captured this natural-color view of the “sub-sub-sub-island.” The top image shows a close-up view of the unnamed island, while the bottom image shows a wider view of Victoria Island’s lake-littered landscape (download large image here)."

 

Tags: Canada, trivia, remote sensing, geospatial.


Via Seth Dixon
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21 Incredible Photos Of The Places Where One Country Ends And Another Begins

21 Incredible Photos Of The Places Where One Country Ends And Another Begins | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
National borders can change very drastically awfully quickly, and when you see the actual borders you can usually tell a lot about the two (or more) countries there.

Via Allison Anthony
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Allison Anthony's curator insight, July 15, 6:26 PM

Great example of political geography: borders and boundaries.

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Photos: The world’s most impressive outdoor mazes and labyrinths

Photos: The world’s most impressive outdoor mazes and labyrinths | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Once a staple in the gardens of European manors and castles, mazes and labyrinths are now the stuff of global tourists.

Via Suvi Salo
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Esperanto Is Not Dead: Can The Universal Language Make A Comeback?

Esperanto Is Not Dead: Can The Universal Language Make A Comeback? | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
A hundred years ago, a Polish physician created a language that anyone could learn easily. The hope was to bring the world closer together. Today Esperanto speakers say it's helpful during travel.

Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 1, 1:49 PM

Can an invented language designed to be a Lingua Franca be someone's mother tongue?  Of course it can be, even in the accents might carry some regionalized variations.  


Tags: podcast, languageculturetourism,

Cultural Infusion's curator insight, July 15, 7:58 PM

Are there still people who speak Esperanto? Discover it with us!

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City Centers Are Doing Better than Inner Suburbs

City Centers Are Doing Better than Inner Suburbs | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

A new report tracks demographic trends across 66 U.S. metro areas.  The report provides comprehensive evidence for Aaron Renn's "new donut" model of cities (pictured in above image, on the right). Renn's model proposes that city centers and outer-ring suburbs are doing well economically, but inner-ring suburbs are struggling with a new influx of poverty."

 

Tags: urban, economic, urban models, APHG.


Via Seth Dixon, Nancy Watson
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Michael Amberg's curator insight, May 26, 11:09 PM

This shows the changes in urban geography and how the world is changing due to all the new technology available now.

Bella Reagan's curator insight, May 26, 11:33 PM

Urban unit

Summary

This article goes in to depth on a newer model on cites called the donut model, as pictured similar to a donut. The donut model was created by Aaron Renn, and it shows urban development recently in cities. The center of the city is grownign economically and falling. There is an influx of people moving in , resulting in an increase of poverty too. Also more educated people are moving in like young newly educated individuals.

insight

The new structure of cities forming is a change from the old. With cities now developing bigger and more industrial, there are many opportunities for people for work in the center of the cit. however, many people may want the jobs but can't get them, so many of those in poverty live in the city centers in search of economic opportunities. It is also interesting to see the status of the people changing the in the city center with that also more young educated people move to city centers, most likely in search of job opportunities. This new way of urban development is modernizing the work system.

Shane C Cook's curator insight, May 27, 8:44 AM

More and more the urban stage is filling and cities are becoming once again the next big thing. After WW2 suburbs became intensively popular but now since a change in personnel views people prefer the city more.

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More ancient woods will be lost to HS2, Natural England admits - Horticulture Week

More ancient woods will be lost to HS2, Natural England admits - Horticulture Week | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
More ancient woods will be lost to HS2, Natural England admits - from Horticulture Week

Via steve batchelder
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