AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO
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The Geography of Home

The Geography of Home | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"Whenever I am living abroad, people always say the same thing, insisting that I am très Américain. Sometimes it's the words I use, or the way I talk.  But back in America, a strange thing happens. People say I have a British accent; they insist I have a European quality."


Via Seth Dixon
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Katherine Burk's comment, September 6, 2013 4:01 PM
I find this interesting as the number story for Cincinnati, Ohio is how Cincinnati isn't as inclusive as it should be despite their hospitality and "niceness". http://cin.ci/1ek8LvX As someone that has traveled and also grew up near Cincinnati. I understand the difficulty in approaching new groups.
Bonnie Bracey Sutton's curator insight, September 9, 2013 2:32 AM

Intersting article.. a good read.

AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO
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GeoGuessr - Let's explore the world!

GeoGuessr - Let's explore the world! | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
GeoGuessr is a geography game which takes you on a journey around the world and challenges your ability to recognize your surroundings.

Via Seth Dixon
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Allison Henley's curator insight, September 10, 2014 2:35 PM

Very addicting even though I'm not that great at it!! haha

Matleena Laakso's curator insight, October 5, 2014 4:55 AM

Tämä on hauska, muutaman kerran on tullut "pelattua".

Alex Smiga's curator insight, September 7, 2015 4:36 PM

Cool game that drops you down somewhere random in the world on street view, then asks you to guess where in the world you are

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Edible Cutlery

"India is one of the world's largest consumers of disposable plastic cutlery, which has the makings of a huge health and environmental crisis written all over it."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 3, 9:15 AM

Plastics clog our landfills and single-use plastic consumption is one of the most wasteful elements of our consumer-based, disposable society.  This product is a reaction against the waste of disposable cutlery, but it is also an intriguing developmental strategy (see company kickstarter page or website). 

 

Tags: developmentfood, gender, agricultureconsumption, South Asia, pollution

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Six maps that will make you rethink the world

Six maps that will make you rethink the world | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
New maps for the U.S. – and the world

Via Tony Burton
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The Geography of Hunger and Food Insecurity

Why are some communities more vulnerable to hunger and famine? There are many reasons, which together add up to food insecurity, the world's no.1 health risk...

 

Excellent summary of the geographic factors that lead to food insecurity and hunger and the main ways NGO's are trying to combat the issues.   This is an incredibly complex problem that, at it's heart, is a geographic issue that can challenge student to synthesize information and make the connections between topics.  


Via Seth Dixon, Michael Miller
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Lisa Fonseca's comment, December 5, 2011 1:02 AM
This is a incredible clip that does challenge students to synthesize information and make the connections between topics, but it can also help students to realize making a difference at a early age is important. I learned an abundance of facts just from watching, it was informative and intriguing. As I was watching the video I was thinking of ways it can be incorporated into the classroom. This video could get students to learn about the world's number one health risk. Incorporating it into the classroom by holding a food drive, or having a school wide fundraiser to donate to the British Red Cross is also another way to help. Getting our future minds informed and helping the community will make an impact in the future.
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Food Waste

Producers, sellers, and consumers waste tons of food. John Oliver discusses the shocking amount of food we don’t eat.

Via Seth Dixon, AP US History
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Jose Soto's curator insight, August 5, 2015 9:21 PM

Food waste is a tragedy that we all know happens, but the economic system does not work efficiently to maximize the global food production (Disclaimer: it is HBO's John Oliver, so there is some language and references that might not be appropriate for all audiences). 

 

Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, sustainability, video, unit 5 agriculture.

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, August 6, 2015 4:20 AM

Food waste is a tragedy that we all know happens, but the economic system does not work efficiently to maximize the global food production (Disclaimer: it is HBO's John Oliver, so there is some language and references that might not be appropriate for all audiences). 


Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, sustainability, video, unit 5 agriculture.

Sue Byrnes's curator insight, August 6, 2015 6:06 PM

Food waste is a tragedy that we all know happens, but the economic system does not work efficiently to maximize the global food production (Disclaimer: it is HBO's John Oliver, so there is some language and references that might not be appropriate for all audiences). 

 

Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, sustainability, video, unit 5 agriculture.

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How Islam Created Europe

How Islam Created Europe | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
In late antiquity, the religion split the Mediterranean world in two. Now it is remaking the Continent.
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You've Never Seen Insect Portraits Like These

You've Never Seen Insect Portraits Like These | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Does it come as any surprise that a portrait photographer’s hobby would still be photography? Given that Levon Biss didn’t have room for an entire portrait studio at home, he turned to shooting insects in his spare time. But his macro setup, and skills have resulted in some of the most spectacular insect portraits you’ll ever see.

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xkcd: Map Projections

xkcd: Map Projections | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

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Mathijs Booden's curator insight, April 27, 12:21 AM
Torn between Robinson and Hodo-Dyer.
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The sinister, secret history of a food that everybody loves

The sinister, secret history of a food that everybody loves | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
The ancient history of the potato could change the story of civilization

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Where is the riskiest place to live?

Where is the riskiest place to live? | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
The world risk index reveals which countries are most at risk from rising sea levels and the increasing frequency of floods, droughts and storms

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In Denmark, You Can Walk Across the World on a Giant Grass Map

In Denmark, You Can Walk Across the World on a Giant Grass Map | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Take a midday stroll across the world.
Via Allison Anthony
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Animals Rule Chernobyl 30 Years After Nuclear Disaster

Animals Rule Chernobyl 30 Years After Nuclear Disaster | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Three decades later, it’s not certain how radiation is affecting wildlife—but it’s clear that animals abound.

 

It may seem strange that Chernobyl, an area known for the deadliest nuclear accident in history, could become a refuge for all kinds of animals—from moose, deer, beaver, and owls to more exotic species like brown bear, lynx, and wolves—but that is exactly what Shkvyria and some other scientists think has happened. Without people hunting them or ruining their habitat, the thinking goes, wildlife is thriving despite high radiation levels.

 

Tags: National Geographic, physical, biogeography, environment, ecology, environment modify, disasters.


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These cities will be very rich in 10 years

These cities will be very rich in 10 years | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Forget New York, London or Hong Kong. Here are seven cities that are racing up the rankings of the world's richest, and will be among the top 10 by 2025, according to researchers from McKinsey.

Via Seth Dixon, Dustin Fowler
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 29, 9:38 AM
  1. Doha, Qatar
  2. Bergen, Norway
  3. Trondheim, Norway
  4. Hwaseong, South Korea
  5. Asan, South Korea
  6. Rhine Ruhr, Germany
  7. Macau, China

Tagsurbandevelopment, economic, planninglaborglobalization, technology.   

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These cloud maps track life on Earth in beautiful detail

These cloud maps track life on Earth in beautiful detail | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Scientists created a cloud atlas that shows a fine-grained view of how clouds move around in our atmosphere.

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Justin Bieber "Love Yourself" Human Geography Parody

20160502-133539.mp4

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Allison Anthony's curator insight, May 3, 8:52 PM

Why can't you all do this?!?

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Hula

Hula | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
See how Hawaii's native dance, hula, has become a source of identity and pride.

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The Great Barrier Reef was not bleached naturally

The Great Barrier Reef was not bleached naturally | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"This year, we’ve seen alarming bleaching of the Great Barrier Reef, caused by warm sea temperatures. A recently completed aerial survey of the reef found that 93 percent of the smaller reefs that comprise it showed at least some bleaching, and in the northern sector of the reef, the large majority of reefs saw bleaching that was severe — meaning many of these corals could die.  There was already considerable murmuring that this event, which damages a famous World Heritage site and could deal a blow to a highly valuable tourism industry, did not simply happen by chance. And now, a near real-time analysis by a group of Australian climate and coral reef researchers has affirmed that the extremely warm March sea temperatures in the Coral Sea, which are responsible for the event, were hardly natural."

 

Tags: biogeography, environment, ecology, Australia, Oceania.


Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 4, 1:31 PM

UPDATE: An infographic from NOAA answering the question, What is coral bleaching?

easyaccentor's comment, May 5, 3:11 AM
Interesting...!!
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AP Human Geography Review


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Allison Anthony's curator insight, May 1, 8:15 PM

This is awesome!

Dustin Fowler's curator insight, May 2, 1:35 PM
This is a great week before, or day before, source.  It has loads of concise information about all topics of Human Geography. 
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This is the best explanation of gerrymandering you will ever see

This is the best explanation of gerrymandering you will ever see | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
By simplifying gerrymandering we see how problematic it really is.
Via Kristen McDaniel
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Kristen McDaniel's curator insight, April 26, 12:47 PM
I thought this had a great visual regarding gerrymandering - it may help more students understand the issue.  
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From farm to factory: Where food comes from now

From farm to factory: Where food comes from now | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
If you’ve seen the words “artisanal” or “local” on a menu, thank Michael Pollan for that. The author, journalist, and food activist — named one of the 100 most influential people in the world by TIME magazine — gave a talk Thursday as part of the 10th-anniversary celebration of Arizona State University’s School of Sustainability.

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Meander? I ‘ardly know ‘er!

Meander? I ‘ardly know ‘er! | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 15, 3:27 PM

This is brilliant.  I can't say how much I love this. 

 

Tagsphysical, fluvial, geomorphology, landscape, funart.

YEC Geo's curator insight, April 28, 9:08 AM
Love geomorphology comics.
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The Invention of Nature

The Invention of Nature | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"Andrea Wulf's new book The Invention of Nature reveals the extraordinary life of the visionary German naturalist Alexander von Humboldt (1769-1859) and how he created the way we understand nature today. Though almost forgotten today, his name lingers everywhere from the Humboldt Current to the Humboldt penguin. Humboldt was an intrepid explorer and the most famous scientist of his age. Perceiving nature as an interconnected global force, Humboldt discovered similarities between climate zones across the world and predicted human-induced climate change. Wulf traces Humboldt’s influences through the great minds he inspired in revolution, evolution, ecology, conservation, art and literature.  In The Invention of Nature Wulf brings this lost hero to science and the forgotten father of environmentalism back to life."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 27, 4:21 PM

Alexander von Humboldt's biographer Andrea Wulf is coming to Rhode Island on May 9th to speak about the greatest scientist that people don't know about.  Alexander von Humboldt has been described as the last great ancient geographer concerned with understanding an eclectic cosmography as well as the first modern geographer. He is honored far and wide throughout Europe and especially  Latin America for his explorations, but given that people are confused as how to categorize him and classify his contributions, today he is under-appreciated.  Geographers need to reclaim his memory and call his extensive, globetrotting work on a wide range of subjects ‘geography.’  Here are more articles and videos on the man that I feel geographers should publicly champion as their intellectual ancestor the way that biologists point to Darwin.  

 

Tags:  historicalbiogeography, book reviews.

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These cities will be very rich in 10 years

These cities will be very rich in 10 years | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Forget New York, London or Hong Kong. Here are seven cities that are racing up the rankings of the world's richest, and will be among the top 10 by 2025, according to researchers from McKinsey.

Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 29, 9:38 AM
  1. Doha, Qatar
  2. Bergen, Norway
  3. Trondheim, Norway
  4. Hwaseong, South Korea
  5. Asan, South Korea
  6. Rhine Ruhr, Germany
  7. Macau, China

Tagsurbandevelopment, economic, planninglaborglobalization, technology.   

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von Humboldt: The Invention of Nature

"Andrea Wulf's new book The Invention of Nature reveals the extraordinary life of the visionary German naturalist Alexander von Humboldt (1769-1859) and how he created the way we understand nature today. Though almost forgotten today, his name lingers everywhere from the Humboldt Current to the Humboldt penguin. Humboldt was an intrepid explorer and the most famous scientist of his age. Perceiving nature as an interconnected global force, Humboldt discovered similarities between climate zones across the world and predicted human-induced climate change. Wulf traces Humboldt’s influences through the great minds he inspired in revolution, evolution, ecology, conservation, art and literature.  In The Invention of Nature Wulf brings this lost hero to science and the forgotten father of environmentalism back to life."


Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 19, 4:30 PM

Alexander von Humboldt has been described as the last great ancient geographer concerned with understanding an eclectic cosmography as well as the first modern geographer. He is honored far and wide throughout Europe and especially  Latin America for his explorations, but given that people are confused as how to categorize him and classify his contributions, today he is under-appreciated.  Geographers need to reclaim his memory and call his extensive, globetrotting work on a wide range of subjects ‘geography.’  Here are more articles and videos on the man that I feel geographers should publicly champion as their intellectual ancestor the way that biologists point to Darwin.  

 

Tags:  historicalbiogeography, book reviews.

Bonnie Bracey Sutton's curator insight, April 30, 11:55 PM
A Great Book to Read " The Invention of Nature"
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These cities will be very rich in 10 years

These cities will be very rich in 10 years | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Forget New York, London or Hong Kong. Here are seven cities that are racing up the rankings of the world's richest, and will be among the top 10 by 2025, according to researchers from McKinsey.

Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 29, 9:38 AM
  1. Doha, Qatar
  2. Bergen, Norway
  3. Trondheim, Norway
  4. Hwaseong, South Korea
  5. Asan, South Korea
  6. Rhine Ruhr, Germany
  7. Macau, China

Tagsurbandevelopment, economic, planninglaborglobalization, technology.   

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A New Map for America

A New Map for America | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
The 50-state model is holding the country back. It needs a new system, built around urban corridors.

Via Seth Dixon, LEONARDO WILD
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 15, 4:51 PM

This is a great article to get students thinking about the spatial network of cities, not just the internal structure of particular cities based on some models. In this article, Parag Khanna argues that the United States is stuck in "an antiquated political structure of 50 distinct states" that isn't aligned with growing urban regions that shape our internal and external economic linkages. He proposed that our infrastruture should strengthen these networks that cut across state boundaries more so than it currently does. "Federal policy should refocus on help these nascent [urban] archipelagos prosper, and helping other emerge...collectively forming a lattice of productive metro-regions efficently through better highways, railways, and fiber-optic cables: a United City-States of America." 

 

Questions to Ponder: What political obstacles would this proposal receive?  Demographically, who would support/oppose this type of restructuring?  How would this impact the economic geographies of the United States? 

 

Tagsop-edregions, urban, transportationeconomic, planning.

 

Jean-Simon Venne's curator insight, April 28, 8:13 AM
We should build a similar map for technology innovaton