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Global flight paths

Global flight paths | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Transportation planner plots pattern of airline travel across the globe.

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jwilliams's comment, May 29, 2013 7:42 AM
Here is a video created of how to use Google Earth and airtraffic visual in a geography class. http://youtu.be/BXva8a1krMo
L.Long's curator insight, February 16, 2014 4:25 AM

Global networks

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GeoGuessr - Let's explore the world!

GeoGuessr - Let's explore the world! | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
GeoGuessr is a geography game which takes you on a journey around the world and challenges your ability to recognize your surroundings.

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Edelin Espino's curator insight, September 10, 2014 2:31 PM

This is a really cool game! You should play it.

Allison Henley's curator insight, September 10, 2014 2:35 PM

Very addicting even though I'm not that great at it!! haha

Matleena Laakso's curator insight, October 5, 2014 4:55 AM

Tämä on hauska, muutaman kerran on tullut "pelattua".

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The Armenian Genocide-100 years

The Armenian Genocide-100 years | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

“For most of the world, the Armenian Genocide is the slaughter you know next to nothing about. But every year on April 24, Genocide Remembrance Day, we Armenians remember the injustice of a crime that is rarely acknowledged and often flatly denied. It was April 24, 1915, when the Armenian intellectuals, professionals, editors and religious leaders in Constantinople were rounded up by the Ottoman authorities — and almost all of them executed. During World War I, the Ottoman Empire killed three of every four of its Armenian citizens. The majority of Armenians alive today are descendants of the few survivors.”


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Jacob Conklin's curator insight, April 16, 4:44 PM

Genocide is the pinnacle of inhumanity and cruelty. There are actually several stages of genocide according to Lemkin's Law. These stages include polarization, dehumanization, and denial. Genocide turns people into vermin fit for extermination. Starting with classification, one group is labeled a scapegoat for some sort of issue. They are then labeled with a symbol like a yellow star or a pink triangle to distinguish them from the rest of the population. The next stage is where the genocide truly begins. Dehumanization. The segregated group no longer consists of people, but a pestilence. A plague. eventually we reach the stage called extermination. The systematic slaughter of the group. The dehumanization is what makes this process easier. They aren't killing people; they are killing rodents. To survive something like this is unfathomable to me. To lose a family member to an illness is nothing compared to the pain of losing your humanity as well as your life. The fact that these acts occurred in the 20th century speaks volumes about how little humanity has progressed and if we will move forward at all as a society. 

tom cockburn's curator insight, April 17, 8:05 AM
Humans make distinctions between each other and there's always an excuse to hate it seems
Maricarmen Husson's curator insight, April 17, 7:37 PM

A 100 AÑOS DEL GENOCIDIO ARMENIO

Cada año el 24 de abril, día de la conmemoración del Genocidio, nosotros los armenios recordamos la injusticia de un crimen que rara vez se reconoció y a menudo negó rotundamente.

Era el 24 de abril de 1915, cuando los intelectuales armenios, profesionales, editores y líderes religiosos de Constantinopla fueron detenidos por las autoridades otomanas - y casi todos ellos ejecutados. Durante la Primera Guerra Mundial, el Imperio Otomano mató a tres de cada cuatro de sus ciudadanos armenios. La mayoría de los armenios vivos hoy son descendientes de los pocos sobrevivientes ".

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One Place, Two Names

One Place, Two Names | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
The government of the People’s Republic of China calls the country’s westernmost region Xinjiang, but the people who have lived there for centuries refer to their home as Eastern Turkistan. Many times when two groups do not refer to a place by the same name, it points to a cultural or political conflict, as is the case here.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 15, 11:23 AM

Multiple names on the map can hint at bigger cultural and political fault lines.  Is it Londonderry or just Derry?  The Sea of Japan or the East Sea?  This article I wrote for the National Geographic Education Blog is on the always simmering tensions in the China's westernmost province.  


TagsCentral Asia, toponyms, culture, political, conflictgovernance, China, East Asia, religionIslam, landscape.

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, April 15, 1:09 PM

This is definitely not the first time a dynamic like this happens and it will not be the last.  Whenever a country tries to incorporate a territory inhabited by a people with a different culture than their own into their sphere friction occurs.  Just like in Africa after the Berlin Conference, the Europeans experienced most resistance due to splitting up ethnic groups or making them live within the same realm as an enemy or outside group.  The indigenous people of Xinjiang, China are not Han Chinese.  They speak and identify more with a Turkish identity.  It is not hard to see that there is a big conflict of interest in the Northwestern corridor of China.

Bob Beaven's curator insight, April 16, 2:06 PM

This blog is interesting as it shows that China is not afraid of suppressing ethnic minorities to advance its goals.  As a social studies education major, with a focus in history, this reminds me of the USSR of old in a way.  Both countries contain ethnic minorities that are marginalized and discriminated against.  China's treatment of the people in Xinjiang or Eastern Turkistan as the natives call it is horrible.  The Communist Government is creating a culture that will push back, increasingly aggressively to the it.  If China doesn't handle this situation wisely, a Chechnya type situation could arise in the region.  China should do its best to prevent this, as this could be detrimental as the country would have to fight insurgents in its borders and it could become a target of the world wide Jihad of radicals in the Middle East.  As interesting as this article is, I actually never heard of this region, unlike Tibet which I learned about in High School.  However, as I said before this region has the possibility to influence the globe and China's reaction also plays into this situation.

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Countries as Named in Their Own Languages

Countries as Named in Their Own Languages | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
A map of the world’s endonyms.

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Interactive maps show travellers Shakespeare's London, Hugo's France - CTV News

Interactive maps show travellers Shakespeare's London, Hugo's France - CTV News | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
A recently launched map allows users to discover Edinburgh via its literary history, while an ongoing mapping project getting buzz this week delves into Shakespeare-era London.
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Table Mountain, Cape Town - National Geographic Photo of the Day

Table Mountain, Cape Town - National Geographic Photo of the Day | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Fog envelops Table Mountain in Cape Town, South Africa, in this National Geographic Photo of the Day from our Your Shot community.

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Coast to Coast: Baseball Hall of Fame Geography Lessons

Coast to Coast:  Baseball Hall of Fame Geography Lessons | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

The history of baseball reflects the story of expansion in the United States. New cities have emerged and modern stadiums have been built as a growing population fueled the popularity of our National Pastime. The result is an extensive network of baseball teams at every level - from the major leagues to the little leagues - that represent the communities and environments in which they play. Everything from jersey colors, names, and symbols to the foods served at ballparks reflects the local landscape and culture of baseball teams. A simple game that began with a bat and ball is now a comprehensive case study of how people and geography are interrelated.

 
All of the lessons and activities have been prepared to accompany "Geography: Baseball Coast to Coast." You will find that the curriculum is organized into three levels: Level 1 for elementary school students, Level 2 for middle school students, and Level 3 for high school students.


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 4, 2014 10:07 PM

Thanks to the NCGE and the Baseball Hall of Fame for working together to bring us these great resources...play ball!!  On a local note, what baseball team is the most popular in your area?  Is there a geography to fan support? 

Marianne Hart's curator insight, April 23, 2014 11:28 AM

 Local teams, stadium name, mascot, Great addition to #MysterySkype

Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 28, 2014 11:50 PM

It neat to think as the population grew a new city needed a new field and team and they use the landscape and culture around them to help decide factors of a team including the name and mascot and even the food. An example would be although you would find hot dogs in every stadium its probably a specialty in Chicago while in New York its pizza and down south in Texas its nachos. 

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Official Maya Angelou Stamp Features Misattributed Quotation From Different Poet

Official Maya Angelou Stamp Features Misattributed Quotation From Different Poet | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Above is the U.S. Postal Service’s new Maya Angelou stamp, officially issued Tuesday and available now for purchase.

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Pakistan won't join Saudis in bombing Yemen's rebels

Pakistan won't join Saudis in bombing Yemen's rebels | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Unanimous vote in Islamabad parliament sees Pakistanis reject Saudi efforts to build broader coalition in favor of diplomacy
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HuGeo - Site and Situation Factors of Industry - YouTube

Applying the geographical concepts of site and situation to the location of industry.

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GeoEd on Social Media

I don't have enough time to comment on every link that I think would be of interest to you, so I've archived some tweets with likes that I think are worth exploring.

 

Tags: geography education, social media, teacher training.


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New Images Show China Literally Gaining Ground in South China Sea

New Images Show China Literally Gaining Ground in South China Sea | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Satellite photos show the speed, scale and ambition China has exerted to assert ownership over South China Sea islands, far from the mainland.

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LEONARDO WILD's curator insight, April 11, 2:29 PM

Political Geoengineering to place land in the sea.

 

Marc Meynardi's curator insight, April 13, 2:40 AM

Suprisingly, the other countries dont show a lot of concerns.

Norka McAlister's curator insight, April 15, 10:06 PM

China is a powerful country with a population of 1.357 billion people. China as a regional hegemony, the more land means expansion of territorial control on the region and projecting sea power on international waters. However the main reason why China, the Philippines, and other countries are trying to claim these islands is due to the oil and natural gas exploitation in the South China Sea. Even when geopolitical conflicts between Philippines and other countries arise, any of these countries will have to form powerful armies in order to fight against China. The U.S. would be the only country that could pursue different strategies and mediate agreements between China’s neighbors. However, through military intimidation, China would overpower any country that tried to claim these islands as part of their territory. 

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Spanish gypsies protest derogatory ethnic reference

Spanish gypsies protest derogatory ethnic reference | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Representatives of the country's Roma population have launched a campaign to remove a negative reference about them from the world's most cited Spanish dictionary
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1989 Raw Video: Man vs. Chinese tank Tiananmen square - YouTube

Share your videos with friends, family, and the world

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Infographic - The toll of a tragedy

Infographic - The toll of a tragedy | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
THE first reported case in the Ebola outbreak ravaging west Africa dates back to December 2013, in Guéckédou, a forested area of Guinea near the border with Liberia and Sierra Leone. Travellers took it across the border: by late March, Liberia had reported eight suspected cases and Sierra Leone six. By the end of June 759 people had been infected and 467 people had died from the disease, making this the worst ever Ebola outbreak. The numbers keep climbing. As of April 5th 2015, 25,550 cases and 10,587 deaths had been reported worldwide, the vast majority of them in these same three countries.

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Joe Biden: A Plan for Central America

Joe Biden: A Plan for Central America | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
If we don’t act, the region’s problems will arrive at our door.

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David Lizotte's curator insight, February 3, 5:14 PM

This was an excellent article written by Biden. It was informative, simple to read, and well structured.

1 Billion Dollars is a lot of money to spend on foreign aid. However, I believe I see the bigger picture at work here. The United States would essentially be investing 1 Billion dollars into Central America, specifically Honduras, Guatemala, and El Salvador. The focus would be to strengthen the police force, control the violence, and create a more stable, democratic functioning government. Once the state is pronounced secure it will be ready for economic negotiations both on a national and international scale. Thus making money for itself and of course its investors. I believe once the United States improves the standard of living for these countries there will be investments made on North America's behalf. Money seems to always dictate relationships and the reasoning as to why they exist. It will take quite some time to reform these countries. None the less I'm sure the U.S. will see an economic profit in the long run, if of course Congress grants the money. These countries may have a lot of resources that can be of some use to more advanced nations. 

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Turkey's Erdogan condemns Pope over Armenia 'genocide'

Turkey's Erdogan condemns Pope over Armenia 'genocide' | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Turkish President Erdogan sharply criticises Pope Francis for using the term "genocide" for the killings of Armenians under Ottoman rule in WW1.

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Johnny Cash Has Been Everywhere (Man)!

Johnny Cash Has Been Everywhere (Man)! | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 28, 6:45 PM

This is more for the teachers than the students since this is most certainly not a current pop culture reference.  Still, what's better than an interactive map displaying the locations where Johnny Cash has been while listening to him sing "I've Been Everywhere?"  (Tech support: Use Google Chrome or Safari to play and ignore the finger). 


Tags: music, transportation, mapping, tourism.

Norka McAlister's curator insight, April 15, 10:08 PM

It remarkable how a map can illustrate in how many cities Johnny Cash performed in with his band. As a famous musician in the U.S., he targeted different states and his audience was diversity. Music gave him the opportunity to help people of all different ethnicties and social backgrounds. With his first band created in Germany, he continued to take his music around the world and especially in the U.S. His country music was most popular in the 70s and 80s and even now it can still be heard on the radio.

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Why People of This Tribe Live over 100 Years and do not Know About Cancer? | RiseEarth

Why People of This Tribe Live over 100 Years and do not Know About Cancer? | RiseEarth | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

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What makes geography grads the most employable?

What makes geography grads the most employable? | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
We asked our experts why they thought geography and psychology graduates were found to be least likely to be unemployed

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 29, 2014 11:23 AM

Some studies have shown that geography graduates are some of the least likely to be unemployed...what makes geography majors so employable?  The mix of skills without one career track makes geography majors able to land on their feet in a shifting economic landscape.  If you wondering about job possibilities for geography majors, here is a list designed to answer the question, "what can I do with a geography degree?"  More than you might think. 

steve smith's curator insight, March 31, 2014 4:04 AM

Why study geography ? This is why

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How Charlotte's Neighborhoods Got Their Names

How Charlotte's Neighborhoods Got Their Names | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Wonder how Myers Park or NoDa became Myers Park and NoDa? To track down these answers, we enlisted the help of local historian Thomas Hanchett.
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Sunnis and Shiites

Sunnis and Shiites | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Clarissa Ward breaks down the history of differences between opposing sects of Islam

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 6, 8:58 PM

The geography of the Sunni-Shiite division is incredibly important for a good understanding of world regional geography as well as modern geopolitics. This 5 minute video (as well as this NPR podcast) examine the historical and religious aspects of this split to then analyze the political and cultural implications in the Middle East today.  Additionally this Pew Research article highlights the 5 countries where the the majority of Muslims are Shiite, with some good demographic data to add to the analysis.  Take this quiz to test your knowledge.  


Tags: MiddleEast, Islamreligionhistorical, culture.

Caterin Victor's curator insight, April 14, 10:51 AM

Since Obama turmoil with his absurd Arab Spring, Sunni Shite are killing one the other like crazy Islamist

Norka McAlister's curator insight, April 15, 10:07 PM

There is a very complicated history between two major religions in the Middle East. History shows how this religion was divided by Mohamed’s death. It turned into a totally new religion and now rivals in the Middle East. I have to mention that one of my co-workers is from Syria and his definition about Sunnis and Shiites are not open minded. The history behind the Muslims religions demonstrate that the more power they have the more places they will dominate. Furthermore, human rights are violated regardless of religious denomination. For some people, Sunnis are considered as terrorist and compared to extremist groups such as Al Qaeda and ISIS. These people who do not want to implement any kind of technology in their countries are holding on to the past with their religion. However, the Shiites experience more freedom even though they still follow strict religious rules. Even the US is confused about these Middle Eastern religions as countries that used to be governed by Sunnis now are run by Shiites. The US needs to remain neutral regarding these religious changes.

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Why Do We Love Paris but Hate Frankfurt? Six Qualities of Beautiful Cities

Why Do We Love Paris but Hate Frankfurt? Six Qualities of Beautiful Cities | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"In 'How to Make an Attractive City,' a new video from the School of Life, London-based Swiss writer Alain de Botton offers a cheeky, thought-provoking, six-point manifesto on the need for making beauty a priority in urban architecture and design."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 23, 11:17 AM

Not everyone is a fan of Paris, but the author of this article feels that tourism can be seen as helpful proxy variable for what the general public perceives as good urbanism that makes for beautiful cities.  The six main points of this article are:

  • Order and Variety
  • Visible Life
  • Compact
  • Orientation and Mystery
  • Scale
  • Local


Tags: urban, planning, urbanism, culture, tourism.

Norka McAlister's curator insight, April 15, 10:07 PM

History is a major attraction to tourists in any city, and Paris seems to have all these requirements to be a good urban city. The variety in architecture that is blended in within past and present structures gives a distinct look and attraction. Planning, of course, would help satisfy public expectations and the variety of culture and color would add to the delightful qualities of the city. Amenities contribute to the diversity of the city and businesses affect the image of culture in the city. 

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Egypt's New Capital?

Egypt's New Capital? | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

The teeming, maddening, and indescribably charming city of Cairo has served as Egypt's capital for 1,000 years. When it emerged it was perhaps the most important cultural center in the Arab world.

But the city's days as Egypt's capital could be numbered. On Friday, the Egyptian government announced that the country will build a new capital from scratch, carving out a piece of the desert between Cairo and the Suez Canal. The project, which is being dubbed "the Capital Cairo," is slated to cost an estimated $45 billion and host Egypt's sprawling government bureaucracy, universities, tourism facilities, hospitals, and a new international airport.


Via Seth Dixon, LEONARDO WILD
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Matt Richardson's curator insight, April 9, 2:33 PM

This is an example of a "forward capital" like Washington DC, Brasilia, and Canberra. 

Mrs. B's curator insight, April 9, 9:10 PM

Urban

SRA's curator insight, April 13, 3:28 PM

I wonder what kind of traditional impact this will have on Egypt's culture. Will the people of Egypt accept this change or voice their opinions. I'm just very interested to see it finished.

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5 ways Europe is trying to convince its citizens to make more babies

5 ways Europe is trying to convince its citizens to make more babies | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
In Denmark, teachers encourage their students to someday make babies as well as practice safe sex.

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Photos: How to Have a Multi-Million Dollar Garden

Photos:  How to Have a Multi-Million Dollar Garden | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
These multi-million dollar homes flaunt the season with amazing landscaping.
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