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What America Manufactures

What America Manufactures | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"It's a myth that the U.S. doesn't make anything anymore."  The U.S. economy still produces more through manufacturing tangible goods ($1.5 trillion) than it does in providing services ($600 billion) for the international market.  The maps and graphs in this article are great teaching materials.  The impact of NAFTA is shown powerfully in the regionalization of U.S. trade partners, making this salient material for a discussion on supranationalism as well.   


Via Seth Dixon, Emma Lafleur
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Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, December 11, 2013 7:09 PM


This is great because now we can witness the creation of jobs in the country which can help the country get out of the depression that it is in. it also can help people get jobs and not have to worry about if there unemployment check is going enough to cover there expenses. Also people that are working are less likely to get depressed because they are not trapped in there homes because now they have something that is distracting them. But the United States is seeing a great improvement because of all the things being manufactured here. One good example is the Honda accord power plant and the ford motor company plant and even general motors in Detroit. all of these companies is helping the Americans get back into the workforce.

Nicholas Patrie's curator insight, September 10, 2014 3:05 PM

i was surprised to see that our country still exports so many products. What i find even more surprising is that the top countries that are buying our good are our bordering countries, Canada and Mexico. As much Petroleum we receive from the middle east we still are exporting so much of it to Canada and Mexico. It seems that foreign cars such as ones from Japan are taking over the industry yet our top export to Canada is car parts. it is good to see that America still exports.

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, September 18, 2014 12:03 PM

I was surprised and reassured to see how much the U.S. exports to other parts of the world.  I was unaware that the U.S exported to China because we physically surrounded by items made in China. Although our imports exceed exports, we are still producing,

 

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AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO
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GeoGuessr - Let's explore the world!

GeoGuessr - Let's explore the world! | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
GeoGuessr is a geography game which takes you on a journey around the world and challenges your ability to recognize your surroundings.

Via Seth Dixon
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Edelin Espino's curator insight, September 10, 2014 2:31 PM

This is a really cool game! You should play it.

Allison Henley's curator insight, September 10, 2014 2:35 PM

Very addicting even though I'm not that great at it!! haha

Matleena Laakso's curator insight, October 5, 2014 4:55 AM

Tämä on hauska, muutaman kerran on tullut "pelattua".

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200 Years Of Maps, From William Smith's Survey To Satellites - Science 2.0

200 Years Of Maps, From William Smith's Survey To Satellites - Science 2.0 | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Science 2.0
200 Years Of Maps, From William Smith's Survey To Satellites
Science 2.0
While “Strata Smith” and his map are well-known among geologists, this humble man and his amazing map do not receive the attention or wider recognition they deserve.
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Human dispersal and the evolution of languages show strong link, Stanford biologists find

Human dispersal and the evolution of languages show strong link, Stanford biologists find | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
In the largest comparison of genetic and linguistic data ever attempted, Stanford biologists find that features of language show a strong link to the geographic dispersal of human populations.

Via Charles Tiayon
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Drones Are Now Appearing on Afghan Rugs

Drones Are Now Appearing on Afghan Rugs | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Kevin Sudeith/Warrug.com When it comes to what to depict on rugs, Afghan weavers traditionally turn to what’s most familiar.
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1940s Urbanism

"This is a film by the Chicago Board Of Education, produced sometime in the 1940s. This film could have been geared towards tourism or to entice companies to come to Chicago or used in the classroom.  The great thing about this film reel, is all the different views of the city they give."

 

Tags: Chicago, urban, place, landscape,  video, urbanism.


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Geography Education on Tumblr

Geography Education on Tumblr | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 30, 11:42 AM

You can now get your 'Geography Education' on Tumblr, if that is a social media platform that you use. 

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Which of the 11 American nations do you live in?

Which of the 11 American nations do you live in? | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
A fascinating new look at the cultural differences between the 11 nations that make up North America.

Via Bonnie Bracey Sutton
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Violinmaking: A historic art

Violinmaking: A historic art | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Musicians agree that the best violins are still the ones made three centuries ago in a small town in Italy.
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Long-lost "Don Quixote" author finally found?

Long-lost "Don Quixote" author finally found? | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
The Spanish have long known that author Miguel de Cervantes was buried somewhere near chapel in Madrid, but for 399 years his exact location has remained a mystery
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Endangered Wildlife Trust

Endangered Wildlife Trust | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"If you don't pick it up they will."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 19, 12:03 PM

I found this ad from the Endangered Wildlife Trust to be very powerful.  It is a good introduction to systems and systems thinking.  

 

Tags: pollutionsustainability, environment, resources, water, coastal.

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Simulation of the Oso Landslide

Simulation of the Oso Landslide | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"The large landslide that occurred in March near Oso, Washington was unusually mobile and destructive."


Via Seth Dixon, Jodi Esaili
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 13, 1:53 PM

There are several reasons for landslides--some are purely a result of physical geography and others are related to land use patterns.  The landslide in Washington state last year was a combination of the two (see on map) and it is a good teaching moment to discuss the environmental impacts of land use patterns and resource extraction projects.  As seen in this interactive, the river was cutting at the base of the hill, while loggers were clear-cutting at the top of the mountain.  Trees help prevent erosion as the roots hold the soil in place--a critical piece to the puzzle in a very rainy climate.  With $1 million worth of timber on the slope, logging companies persisted despite objections from the Department of Natural Resources and some restrictions (but in hindsight, those restrictions clearly were not enough).  Watch a simulation of the landslide here.  

View the impact in ArcGIS online: Before and After Swipe, LiDAR I and II, and Imagery.


Questions to Consider: Other than economic worth, what other ways are there to value and evaluate the environment?  How could this landscape have been protected and managed better or was this landslide inevitable?   


Tagspolitical ecology, resources, environment, environment modify, industry, physical, geomorphology, erosion, landforms.

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, January 27, 4:50 PM

This seems like a useful tool to a degree.  But if we could actually simulate every destructive event then we would be miracle workers.  This was a sad event.  We have left such an imprint on the earth that it's starting to fight back.  We need to be more aware and careful with the one planet we have.  Climate changes are in the news more and more.  We can't ignore climate changes anymore.  

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If Britain were a U.S. state, it would be the second-poorest, behind Alabama and before Mississippi

If Britain were a U.S. state, it would be the second-poorest, behind Alabama and before Mississippi | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Britain's GDP divided by population ranks worse than all but one U.S. state.
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Folk Culture--Tradition


Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 13, 1:05 PM

The clip which starts at 0:25 (speaking at 0:50) is an audiovisually rich cultural collage.  Folk cultures are often described as regionally based, nearly homogenous, rural cultures.  These societies are typically dominated by the older generation, traditional, family-based and slow to change.  Folk cultures typically rural, religious, agricultural, family-based and in a word: traditional.  This classic movie's opening is a good primer for markers of folk cultures and struggles that folk cultures have to maintain there vitality in a globalizing world.  If you continue on in the movie, the actual song Tradition is also rich in explaining how the society maintains itself.  


Tags: Russia, folk cultures, culture, music.

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Mindy Kaling's Super Bowl Ad: Are Indian Women Invisible?

Mindy Kaling's Super Bowl Ad: Are Indian Women Invisible? | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
In a commercial, the comedian pretends no one can see her. One Indian journalist says there's more to the ad than selling insurance. Being visible comes with a risk of violence for women in India.
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The coldest town on Earth - Washington Post

The coldest town on Earth - Washington Post | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Welcome to Oymyakon, Russia. It’s dark for 21 hours per day — and, during winter, temperatures average minus 58 degrees Fahrenheit.
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Sculptures of sea monsters from old maps - Boing Boing

Sculptures of sea monsters from old maps - Boing Boing | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Boing Boing
Sculptures of sea monsters from old maps
Boing Boing
Toronto artist Bailey Henderson's "Monstrorum Marines" sculpture series is based on the creepy creatures illustrated on Medieval and Renaissance maps ("Here be dragons," etc.).
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Modes of Transport Converted Into Hotel Accommodations

Modes of Transport Converted Into Hotel Accommodations | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
How do you like to sleep in a Porsche bed, or stay inside a refurbished 727, or make an antique caboose as your holiday home, or find shelter inside a furnished caravan? It’s all possible.

Via F. Thunus
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University Re-Imagines Town And Gown Relationship In Philadelphia

University Re-Imagines Town And Gown Relationship In Philadelphia | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Drexel University is taking a hands-on approach to redeveloping one of Philadelphia's poorest neighborhoods with a new center designed to serve not just students but mainly local residents.

Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 30, 12:49 PM

This NPR podcast shows a good example of an urban revitalization project that is actively trying to avoid following the gentrification path.  Growing colleges can unintentionally displace longtime residents, but this project is about preserving the cultural fabric of the neighborhood and building good will in the community. 


Tags: neighborhoodpodcast, gentrificationurban, place, culture, economicracepoverty.

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Beautiful Photos Of The World's Oldest And Most Majestic Trees

Beautiful Photos Of The World's Oldest And Most Majestic Trees | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
These trees are spectacular.

Via Barb Jemmott
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Tossing Out Food In The Trash? In Seattle, You'll Be Fined For That

Tossing Out Food In The Trash? In Seattle, You'll Be Fined For That | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Seattle is the first city in the nation to fine people for not properly sorting their garbage. The law took effect on Jan. 1 as a bid to keep food out of landfills and encourage composting instead.
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Li Na's victory - CBS News

Li Na's victory - CBS News | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Lesley Stahl profiles the great Chinese tennis champion who stood up to her country's stringent sports system
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The Coolest Subway Stations In The World

The Coolest Subway Stations In The World | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
New Yorkers spend most of their time on the subway either stressing over train delays or wondering why the dude manspreading next to them is wearing a velour jumpsuit and eating a full plate of spaghetti. Straphangers abroad have similar woes, but wi...

Via Suvi Salo
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How American Agriculture Works

How American Agriculture Works | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
There really are two different Americas: the heartland, and the coasts....

Via Seth Dixon, Jane Ellingson
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Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, January 27, 4:46 PM

My uncles in Iowa grow corn for ethanol.  They have a small crop where they grow corn they consume.  It is literally the best corn I've ever had.  I'm actually surprised Rhode Island produces almost $4mil in sweet corn.  I'm amazed that Mass produces $100 mil in cranberries.  I've seen a few cranberry bogs close down.  We produce so much why can't we actually feed everyone?  

Diane Johnson's curator insight, January 28, 8:47 PM

Useful data for sustainability discussions

Bob Beaven's curator insight, January 29, 2:38 PM

These maps are interesting, in the fact that the heartland of the United States differs so much from either coast.  Both the coasts, as seen in the first map grow fruits and vegetables.  The center of the country grows wheat, and wheat is the dominant  crop of the country.  This might account for the reason why fruits and vegetables are more expensive than grain based products.  The second map helps to drive home this point even further, of how different the coasts are from the heartland.  What I also thought was funny, however, was the author's comment that it looks like an electoral map.  Perhaps, the reason heartland states tend to side with each other and republicans is because of shared interests in the political arena.

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Istanbul - They Might Be Giants - lyrics - YouTube

Title: Istanbul Artist: They Might Be Giants Album: Flood Year: 1990 Owned by: WMG This is not of my creation.

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25 Maps That Describe America

25 Maps That Describe America | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Despite being just one country, anyone who lives in the United States knows that no two states are alike. Here are 25 maps that show some of these regional differences.
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