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AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO
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GeoGuessr - Let's explore the world!

GeoGuessr - Let's explore the world! | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
GeoGuessr is a geography game which takes you on a journey around the world and challenges your ability to recognize your surroundings.

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Edelin Espino's curator insight, September 10, 2:31 PM

This is a really cool game! You should play it.

Allison Henley's curator insight, September 10, 2:35 PM

Very addicting even though I'm not that great at it!! haha

Matleena Laakso's curator insight, October 5, 4:55 AM

Tämä on hauska, muutaman kerran on tullut "pelattua".

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U.S. airdrops arms to Kurds fighting in Syrian town of Kobani

U.S. airdrops arms to Kurds fighting in Syrian town of Kobani | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
The U.S. military said it had air-dropped arms to Syrian rebels fighting Islamic State militants near Kobani on Sunday in what appeared to be the Pentagon's first public acknowledgment it ...

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Geography of Coffee - GIS Lounge

Geography of Coffee - GIS Lounge | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

Almost everything can be seen through the eyes of a geographer. Take coffee, for example; to most people, coffee is a delicious beverage and nothing more.


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America is rapidly aging in a country built for the young

America is rapidly aging in a country built for the young | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"Although we seldom think about them this way, most American communities as they exist today were built for the spry and mobile. We've constructed millions of multi-story, single-family homes where the master bedroom is on the second floor, where the lawn outside requires weekly upkeep, where the mailbox is a stroll away. We've designed neighborhoods where everyday errands require a driver's license. We've planned whole cities where, if you don't have a car, it's not particularly easy to walk anywhere — especially not if you move gingerly.

This reality has been a fine one for a younger country. Those multi-story, single-family homes with broad lawns were great for Baby Boomers when they had young families. And car-dependent suburbs have been fine for residents with the means and mobility to drive everywhere. But as the Baby Boomers whose preferences drove a lot of these trends continue to age, it's becoming increasingly clear that the housing and communities we've built won't work very well for the old."


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MsPerry's curator insight, September 21, 3:14 PM

APHG-U2

Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, September 22, 12:47 PM

This reality is detrimental to the future of our society because it focuses on the now rather than looking into long terms on how these changes will impact our world in the long run. Looking at the way our society is progressing, these changes are relevant in major metropolitan cities, where the job market is attractive to the young rather than those with over 30 years of experience. In our society, not many see retirement being in the center of the city. Creating a society that accommodates both the young and the old, along with the married and unmarried is pivotal to the progression of  our ever changing world. 

Alexandra Piggott's curator insight, October 18, 6:48 PM

This is also an issue in Australia where the overwhelming majority of people live in single story dwellings and are very car reliant.

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World map: Where people feel they live good lives

World map: Where people feel they live good lives | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

A new Gallup report charts "global states of mind."


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A hard look at corn economics — and world hunger

A hard look at corn economics — and world hunger | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Corn is not what you think. For starters: Most of the time, it's not human food.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 14, 3:07 PM

Land use practices that determine what is grown in a particular place are partly determined by the health needs of a local population, but they are more directly shaped by economic markets.  Over 75% of the corn produced in the United States is destined for animal feed or fuel; since global population projections are now supposed to be 11 billion by 2100, these are some important issues for us to consider before we are forced to reassess our societal choices.    


Tagspodcast, political ecologyagriculture, food production, land use.

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Video: How do you pronounce ‘water?’

Video: How do you pronounce ‘water?’ | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
YouTube users across the United States have uploaded dozens of videos to demonstrate their local dialects. PostTV examined people’s accents and state-specific answers to an online list of common questions.

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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, July 16, 10:42 AM

unit 3, this is one of my favorite topics in class!

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International Migration

Almost everywhere on the world, international migration is a hot topic. Most of the time the debate about migration is fierce and charged with prejudices and...

Via Natalie K Jensen, Nancy Watson, Seth Dixon, Clairelouise
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Bella The Non-Vampire's curator insight, September 10, 9:59 AM

Migration is something that has been happening for years. Today there are many migrants in America. In fact migrants choose 
America to migrate to. The many migrants here in America is from Mexico. There are many reasons for migrating. Many people migrate to avoid war and environmental disasters. Also, many people migrate for job opportunities and economic purposes. I.C.

Sierra_Mcswagger's curator insight, September 10, 10:02 AM

This video is primarily talking on the widely known topic of migration. 3 percent of the worlds population is living away from there place of birth. The push of migration from places include poverty, war, and environmental disasters. The migration pull in some places are because of  economic opportunity, and political freedom. Migration is increasing, and is thought of as a bad thing.(s.s.)

Aurora Rider's curator insight, October 7, 8:59 PM

This video is great for going over the many different aspects that go along with migration. It talks about what migration is and the reasons why people migrate known as push and pull factors. It talks about the different types of migration such as asylum seakers and illegal immigration. It mentions the disadvantages and advantages of migration.

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What Copenhagen can teach us about cycling

What Copenhagen can teach us about cycling | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
From ‘green wave’ traffic lights and majestic harbour bike bridges to digital countdowns and foot rests at junctions, the Danish capital is full of clever ideas to improve city cycling

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These Photographs Show What Life Is Like on $1 a Day

These Photographs Show What Life Is Like on $1 a Day | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
A new book explores extreme poverty on four continents

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3 horrific inaccuracies in Homeland's depiction of Islamabad

3 horrific inaccuracies in Homeland's depiction of Islamabad | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
The Showtime drama's version of the Pakistani capital is so inaccurate that it would be laughable — if it weren't so irresponsible.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 17, 2:52 PM

T.V. producers are well-within their rights to creatively image fictitious people, places, and plots.  Artists are also open to take 'creative license' re-imagine actual people, events, and places.  That being said, they can be criticized for blatant misrepresentations that reinforce negative stereotypes of people and places.  Given the paltry amount of geographic education given in the United States, popular media representations play a large role in shaping ideas and opinions about places with important foreign policy implications.  That is why relying on stereotypes in the arts can compound cultural and political understandings between peoples.  As the author says: 

  1. Islamabad is a beautiful, well-planned city--not a grimy netherworld.
  2. Nobody speaks the bizarre, nonsensical language of the 'local' characters on Homeland. 
  3. Americans aren't hated, and protest don't dissolve into bloodthirsty mobs. 
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Population Density

This talks about what population density is and why people live where they do.-- Created using PowToon -- Free sign up at http://www.powtoon.com/ . Make your...

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Jeremy Hansen's curator insight, Today, 10:46 AM

Excellent short video defining and explaining population density. 

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Feeding Our Hungry Planet

"By 2050, the world's population will likely increase 35 percent. But is growing more food the only option—or even the best? National Geographic investigates the challenges and solutions to feeding everyone on our planet, based on an eight-month series in National Geographic magazine.  Visit http://natgeofood.com for ongoing coverage of food issues as we investigate the Future of Food today on World Food Day."

 

Tags: sustainability, agriculture, food production, unit 5 agriculture.


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Truthbehere2's curator insight, October 17, 10:30 AM

I think I might as well buy some land and plant my own huge garden for this crap coming up and have a fence around my yard too

Nancy Watson's curator insight, October 19, 8:53 AM

Population increase is just part of the story. How do we feed everyone? How will we provide for the needs of everyone?  Can the earth sustain the use of her resources and the impact of our growing needs and output. First we must eat. Can we learn to do that wisely? 

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Troubles on Russia's Lake Baikal

"Workers at an ailing paper mill in Siberia are clinging to their jobs in the face of financial pressure and criticism from environmentalists.
Related Article: http://nyti.ms/gSvOkM"


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Shanelle Zaino's curator insight, October 15, 8:19 PM

This was an extremely interesting video. I had known of what a Monotown was  but didn't know there was an actual name. This paper mill located in Siberia had been shut down do to environmental infractions.It is extremely sad to see people struggling to put food on the table, as well as seeing the environment suffering.It was interesting to learn that lake Baikal is the world's largest lake holding such a large portion of the world's fresh water. Considering it is such a large part of the ecosystem it seems more beneficial to worry about the quality of the lake and it's ecosystem while creating alternative employment for the employees of the paper mill. One idea that may be beneficial would be to employ the people of the paper mill to care for the lake. The environment and the community would benefit.

Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, October 19, 9:25 PM

It's sad when the environment is second to people needing to destroy it to live.  These people are so in need of their jobs at the paper mill for a source of income that they don't care what happens to the lake.  Continuing to dump the pollutants into the lake with a bill signed off just to keep a job is not okay.  There should be a plan put in place to both save the jobs of these people, as well as saving the lake as well.  At this point in time they don't see or care about the future effects this polluting of the lake will have on their children and their children's children.  It is unfortunate that they are in so need of jobs and everyone just seems to be overlooking the environmental issues that are taking place because no one will take a stand and demand environmental protection as well as their jobs.  

James Hobson's curator insight, October 20, 7:05 PM

(Russia topic 3)

It's sad to find out that even in the far reaches of the world human development is having a deep-reaching negative impact on the environment. I relate the problem of Lake Baikal to that of Haiti's forests: both have resulted, in their own unique ways, from lack of government regulation. Sights have been only upon short-term profits, and blind eyes have been turned to the wellbeing of the future. The Lake is more than just a resource to be exploited; it's also a natural wonder, complex ecosystem, scientific marvel, and source of sustenance which, only if used with sustainability in mind, can continue to exist well into the future. Since Lake Baikal, along with some of the deepest oceanic trenches, is among one of the last unexplored frontiers on the planet, I hope that this message will hit especially hard. Just like seeds: if all of them are consumed, you don't have any fruit for the future.

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Old World Language Families Map - Maps on the Web

Old World Language Families Map - Maps on the Web | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Old World Language Families Map

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Saving history: Saving Italy's Colosseum becomes fashionable

Saving history: Saving Italy's Colosseum becomes fashionable | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
As the government struggles to maintain the country's historic ruins and monuments, Morley Safer discovers it's become fashionable to help
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Where Has All the Water Gone?

Where Has All the Water Gone? | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
ENVIRONMENT Once the fourth-largest lake in the world, Central Asia's shrinking Aral Sea has reached a new low, thanks to decades-old water diversions and a more recent drought. (National Geographi...
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China's Urban Population Now Exceeds 50% of Population

China's Urban Population Now Exceeds 50% of Population | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
China's Urban Population Now Exceeds 50% of Population.

 

China has historically been a predominantly rural country; a major part of the economic growth of the last few decades has been driven my a push towards urbanization.   Now that China is predominantly an urban population, what will that been for resource consumption, development and global economics? 


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Sabrina Gam's curator insight, May 5, 2013 5:00 AM

China & its population is something that we as geographers must be aware of; this ever growing population of people will play a large part to our human geogrpahy. 

Rachael Johns's curator insight, September 9, 6:15 PM

The population in China is still exceeding in spite of the safety regulations that they've set to limit their population growth. With their population being 20% of the worlds population China is the most populous country in the world. One in five people is a resident of China, but with recent studies statistics show that by 2040 India will exceed 1.52 billion. ~R.J~

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Feeding the Whole World

"Louise Fresco argues that a smart approach to large-scale, industrial farming and food production will feed our planet's incoming population of nine billion. Only foods like (the scorned) supermarket white bread, she says, will nourish on a global scale."


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AckerbauHalle's curator insight, October 19, 7:18 AM

Sehr interessanter Beitrag von Louise Fresco zur Problematik des Welthungers. 

Marianne Naughton's curator insight, October 19, 12:07 PM

Feed The World ...

dilaycock's curator insight, October 19, 6:45 PM

Fresco argues that we tend to see "home-made" agriculture as a thing of beauty, whereas the reality is that many small scale farmers struggle and live a subsistence lifestyle. The adoration of small-scale farming, notes Fresco, is a luxury to those who can afford it. Large-scale production has increased the availability and affordability of food. Food production should be given as high a priority as climate change and sustainability, and we should seriously consider ways in which land can be used as a multi-purpose space that includes agriculture.

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The long and ugly tradition of treating Africa as a dirty, diseased place

The long and ugly tradition of treating Africa as a dirty, diseased place | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
How alarmist, racist coverage of Ebola makes things worse. A dressing down of the latest #NewsweekFail.

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Christian Allié's curator insight, October 18, 3:33 AM

..................""""""""""""""""""""""""""""".............

 

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_ Vidéo_

 

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The Newsweek story could generate additional prejudice against African migrants, a population that already suffers from greater prejudice than other immigrant groups. In the psychology study referenced above, researchers found that simply manipulating the geographical origin of a hypothetical immigrant group – from Eastern Africa to Eastern Asia to Eastern Europe — yielded significant differences in attitudes in a study population toward the immigrant group.

 

Fear-mongering narratives about Ebola circulating in the popular media can also have a serious effect on knowledge and attitudes about Ebola. Though there are no cases of person-to-person infection in the United States, a recent poll conducted by the Harvard School of Public Health reports 39 percent of Americans think there will be a large Ebola outbreak in the United States and more than a quarter of Americans are concerned that they or someone in their immediate family may get sick with Ebola in the next year. A similar poll conducted for Reason-Rupe had four in 10 Americans saying an Ebola outbreak in the United States was likely, and conservative Americans were more likely to say an outbreak was likely. These two national surveys show Americans are grossly overestimating their risk of infection.

 

The long history of associating immigrants and disease in America and the problematic impact that has on attitudes toward immigrants should make us sensitive to the impact of “othering” African immigrants to the United States in the midst of the current Ebola outbreak in West Africa. Scare-mongering about infinitesimally small risks in one context serves no purpose to the greater good of trying to curb disease transmission and relieve people’s suffering in another context.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, October 20, 12:40 PM

unit 3 and 4

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, October 20, 3:29 PM

The long and ugly tradition of treating Africa as a dirty, diseased place

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URI GIS Training Opportunities

URI GIS Training Opportunities | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

Classes scheduled for January 2015 GIS training at URI.  All classes held at URI's Kingston Campus.  All classes are hands-on computer training and require no prior knowledge of GIS. 

 

Using ArcGIS.com ®: Jan. 8, 2015:  This half-day training will introduce participants to ESRI's online mapping applications available at ArcGIS.com. The training will explore "ready to use" maps and also explore the basic functionality of the applications.  Particular attention will be paid to the datasets available through RIGIS. 

 

Introduction to GIS:  Jan. 13 - 15, 2015: This three-day training program has been written in collaboration with the University of Connecticut.  In this course you will learn some GIS concepts and become very familiar with the extensive Rhode Island GIS database (RIGIS) while using ESRI's ArcGIS Desktop 10.2 ® software.


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Scandinavian Energy Usage

Scandinavian Energy Usage | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

Which countries consume the most electricity per person? You might guess the United States would top the World Bank’s list, but the Nordic countries of Iceland, Norway, Finland, and Sweden are actually at or near the top. Icelanders consume an average of 52,374 kilowatt hours per person per year, Norwegians 23,174 kilowatt hours, Finns 15,738 kilowatt hours, and Swedes 14,030 kilowatt hours. Americans are not far behind, with an average consumption of 13,246 kilowatt hours per person. The Japanese consume 7,848 kilowatt hours.

 

This image is part of a global composite assembled from data acquired by the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (Suomi NPP) satellite in 2012. The nighttime view of Earth was made possible by the “day-night band” of the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite. VIIRS detects light in a range of wavelengths from green to near-infrared and uses filtering techniques to observe dim signals such as city lights, wildfires, and gas flares. The city lights of several major Nordic cities are visible in the imagery, including Stockholm, Sweden (population 905,184); Oslo, Norway (634,463); Helsinki, Finland (614,074), and Reykjavik, Iceland (121,490).

 

Tags: Europe, energy, remote sensing, development, Sweden, Finland, Iceland, Norway.


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Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, October 16, 8:42 PM

Some very good points are brought up in this article.  Like most others I did not think that the Nordic states were huge consumers of electricity.  They however talk about how the cost of electricity because of alternative energy sources is a lot cheaper than it is in the United States.  Also they are at a much more northern latitude than we are, which means longer darker winters and nights.  This darkness creates a need for the use of more lights.  Even with the larger use of electricity the idea to keep in mind is that they are using a lot more renewable energy sources therefore producing less greenhouse gasses in the process.

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Where We Came From, State by State

Where We Came From, State by State | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Charts showing how Americans have moved between states for 112 years.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 14, 1:20 PM

This incredible series of interactive charts from the New York Times show where the residents of every U.S. state were born and how that data has changed over time (update: now available as an interactive map).  This graph of Florida shows that around 1900, most people living in Florida were from the South.  Around the middle of the 20th century more people from other parts of the U.S. and from outside the U.S. started moving in.  What changes in U.S. society led to these demographic shifts?  How has demographics of your state changes over the last 114 years? 

   

On the flip side, many people have been leaving California and this article charts the demographic impact of Californians on other states.  


Tags: migration, USAvisualization, census, unit 2 population.

MsPerry's curator insight, August 17, 3:42 PM

APHG-U2

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Ebola Virus Disease Distribution Map | Ebola Hemorrhagic Fever | CDC

Ebola Virus Disease Distribution Map | Ebola Hemorrhagic Fever | CDC | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

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