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What’s your local HDI (human development index)?

What’s your local HDI (human development index)? | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"A recently-released online tool enables Californians to see where they stand on a “human development index” – a composite measure of health, knowledge and standard of living developed by the American Human Development Project of the Social Sciences..." 

This is cool.  Instead of aggregating the data at the country level and comparing countries, we can see differences in local levels of human development.  Students see patterns of socio-economics and development vividly, and in an intensely local way tailored to their regional frame of reference.   


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Tracey Sarvis's curator insight, November 9, 2014 8:20 AM

Development and HDI

 

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GeoGuessr - Let's explore the world!

GeoGuessr - Let's explore the world! | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
GeoGuessr is a geography game which takes you on a journey around the world and challenges your ability to recognize your surroundings.

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Edelin Espino's curator insight, September 10, 2014 2:31 PM

This is a really cool game! You should play it.

Allison Henley's curator insight, September 10, 2014 2:35 PM

Very addicting even though I'm not that great at it!! haha

Matleena Laakso's curator insight, October 5, 2014 4:55 AM

Tämä on hauska, muutaman kerran on tullut "pelattua".

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You did such a wonderful thing: Huge surprise for hero Sikh man

Harman Singh defied the rules of his religion to help an injured young boy.

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World's largest hotel coming to Mecca

World's largest hotel coming to Mecca | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Abraj Kudai, a complex in Mecca, Saudi Arabia, is set to become the world's largest hotel by room count when it opens in 2017.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 23, 10:46 AM

Las Vegas currently has the four of the five largest hotels in the world; people flock to the Nevada desert in droves for the gambling and nightlife.  Mecca has a very distinct draw that pulls tourists in from all over the world.  As a sacred pilgrimage site, the tourism industry thrives and needs an immense infrastructure to handle the high volume of visitors that come for the Hajj.

   

Tagstourism, Islam, Saudi Arabiaculture, religion, Middle East.

Daniel Lindahl's curator insight, May 25, 12:56 PM

This massive hotel coming to Mecca will attract many new tourists. It will become the world's largest hotel, and should drastically help to improve Mecca's economy. 

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13 maps about America worth bringing up at dinner parties and/or first dates

Did you know that Texas' economy is the same size as Australia's? Now tell your date.

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Nancy Watson's curator insight, May 20, 8:33 PM

You gotta love how maps can be a wealth of information (#1)

 

 

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Adventures in mapping: 12 TED Talks

Adventures in mapping: 12 TED Talks | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Maps don’t just tell you which street to turn left on. See what we mean, below.

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Nancy Watson's curator insight, May 17, 7:36 AM

Maps can tell you much more than direction. Love TED Talks

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This mesmerizing map shows the world's buses and trains moving in real time

Swiss-German IT firm GeOps has collaborated with the University of Freiburg on an interactive map of the world's major mass transit systems, incorporating public data feeds (like the MTA's) offered...

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Suvi Salo's curator insight, May 16, 10:17 PM

via Random

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How to Make an Attractive City

We've grown good at making many things in the modern world - but strangely the art of making attractive cities has been lost. Here are some key principles for how to make attractive cities once again.

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Loreto Vargas's curator insight, May 17, 11:18 AM

I dedicate this article and its video to my fellow citizens in Santiago, Chile!!

Dedico este artículo y su video a mis conciudadanos Santiaguinos! Una lección de urbanismo!

Ethan Bernick's curator insight, May 19, 9:38 PM

This video is applicable to suburbanization in the fact that many of the same factors go into it. Suburbs too need order but sometimes too ordered can be bad. Growth limitations also have to be set.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 21, 9:41 AM

unit 7

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Do We Talk Funny? 51 American Colloquialisms - NPR

Do We Talk Funny? 51 American Colloquialisms - NPR | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
American English has a rich history of regionalisms — which sometimes tell us a lot about where we come from.

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Millennials leaving church in droves, study says - CNN.com

Millennials leaving church in droves, study says - CNN.com | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Nearly one-third of millennials say they are unaffiliated with any faith, up 10 percentage points since 2007.

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Egypt, Ethiopia and Sudan sign deal to end Nile dispute

Egypt, Ethiopia and Sudan sign deal to end Nile dispute | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Three African leaders sign an initial deal to end a long-running dispute over the sharing of Nile waters and the building of Africa's biggest hydroelectric dam.

Via Seth Dixon, David Lizotte, Luke Gray
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Lena Minassian's curator insight, April 8, 12:45 PM

This was an interesting read because I was not too familiar with this dispute. Three leaders have officially signed a deal to end a long dispute over sharing the Nile waters and beginning to build Africa's largest hydroelectric dam in Ethiopia. The three leaders are from Sudan, Ethiopia, and Egypt and signed the agreement in Sudan's capital city. Many feared that previous Dam's would worsen the water supply but this new Dam will give a more fairer share for everyone. These leaders assured that this new Dam will not cause any harm to the downstream countries but this project is still a ooncern for Egypt. The nile is the only source of water for some. Ethiopia has stated the the river will be diverted a little but will still follow it's natural course. Ethiopia is being backed up by many other countries as well.

David Lizotte's curator insight, April 10, 3:29 PM

The key of this article is that there has been an initial treaty signed. This agreement overturns a colonial era treaty which stated any countries upstream (south of Egypt) essentially had no right to touch the Nile in any way that would effect Egypt. They had veto power over everything. 

The reason behind this is that Ethiopia had overthrown there colonial power-Italy, in the 1890's-and was henceforth its own country. Another attempt to seize Ethiopia took place in the 1930's under Benito Mussolini's rule. Him being a fascist and wanting to be like Hitler and take everything certainly contributed to Mussolini wanting to take Ethiopia. Another contributing factor is the fact that Italy tried and failed in claiming/colonizing Ethiopia. They had lost in the battle field. Mussolini wanted to improve and prove Eastern Italian Africa's dominance. Ethiopia would be freed of Italy's rule during WWII and become its own country once again. In any case the article states the treaty designed by the British was set forth in 1929. Ethiopia was not part of British Africa, or a protectorate (in regards to what Egypt would become in relation to the UK), so Britain would not care about the Nile in Ethiopia, rather the Nile in Sudan and especially in Egypt. Any country upstream is to not obstruct or deter the natural flow of the Nile-a pivotal source for Egyptian civilization. 90 percent of Egyptians live within 20km of the Nile while a little over 50 percent live within 1km. It is clear Egypt needs the Nile in order to function.

Ethiopia is able to create jobs through the building of the dam and will also be able to employ people through dam maintenance, inspections, etc... for years to come (if the dam is built). The dam will also provide an immense amount of power/energy, truly benefiting the country. The article states Ethiopia just wants to take a more fair share of the Nile. Everybody feels entitled to the Nile. This concept I understand. With that being said I also understand the concept of Egypt being concerned. There country functions though the Nile and its existing. 

I would like to see more of Ethiopia's plans and the statistics they've gathered throughout the duration of this project. I'm sure they have comprised some projected statistics, not just focusing on the positive aspects (for them) but also the negative aspects for Sudan and Egypt. The article states Sudan is on board but Egypt-although taking part in the new agreement thus putting aside the colonial era treaty- is very hesitant when discussing the existence of the dam. Obviously there are fair reasons for the concern...but then again exactly what are the reasons? How would the Nile be affected by the dam and also how would countries downstream (Egypt, Sudan) be affected? 

Its a concern amongst African countries but is it also a concern amongst the world? Will professionals from other countries "put their two cents in?" 

With all this being said, I suppose it does not matter...to Ethiopia. They have already begun the process of building and are about 30% completed. As stated in this bbc article: http://www.bbc.com/news/world-africa-26679225 Another interesting factor is how other sub Saharan countries are in favor of the dam. Why? Being in favor means they probably benefit from the dam as well, however this is something that may come to my light at the dam progresses. Until the dams construction is arrested, the dam is certainly being built. Ethiopia is making ground, excuse me energy, to better its country as a whole.  

Kevin Cournoyer's curator insight, May 6, 7:22 PM

This article discusses the dispute between Egypt and Ethiopia over the construction of a dam that would provide Ethiopia with a larger share of the Nile's water. Egypt is wholly opposed to this dam because it would mean less water for the country, which so desperately needs it. With 95% of the population of Egypt living within 20km of the Nile River, a reduction in the amount of water supplied to these tens of millions could potentially spell slow disaster. At the same time, however, Ethiopia desperately needs water from the Nile in order to provide sustainable energy for its citizens. 

 

The Nile has been a source of life and energy for thousands of years in an oppressively hot, dry place. The ancient Egyptians counted on the Nile to flood every year so that they would have arable land and used the large river to irrigate their farmland. It is almost ironic, therefore, that Egyptians are once again counting on the water of the Nile to help them survive in such a harsh climate. It seems that the Nile is one of those natural geographic features that is pivotal to political, economic, and social wellbeing. It represents the nexus between natural landforms and the political and economic goals of human beings and nations. Dispute over use of the Nile as a natural and life-giving resource is not the first instance of human debate over possession or use of natural geography and it likely won't be the last. 

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Genghis Khan

Genghis Khan | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

Temujin (c. 1162-1227), better known by his title, Genghis Khan (or Chinggis Khan, among scholars), founded the Mongol Empire, one of he largest ever by land. Only the British Empire was larger, and not by much. It was also one of the bloodiest, killing 30 to 40 million people by some estimates. So many that it led to a marked drop in carbon dioxide levels.


He is a huge hero in his native Mongolia, honoured in China but is seen as a barbarian destroyer pretty much everywhere else, especially in Russia.

 

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Giving the Poor Easy Access to Healthy Food Doesn’t Mean They’ll Buy It

Giving the Poor Easy Access to Healthy Food Doesn’t Mean They’ll Buy It | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Those living in areas without fresh produce tend not to eat well. But just putting in a supermarket is not a panacea, it turns out.

 

Tags: food distribution, food, economic, poverty, place, socioeconomic, neighborhood.


Via Seth Dixon
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LEONARDO WILD's curator insight, May 10, 9:27 AM

Stigmergy at work.

Meridith Hembree Berry's curator insight, May 10, 3:55 PM

It is difficult to change the junk food and convenience food culture in one generation. 

Robert Slone's curator insight, May 19, 9:04 AM

This was really surprising , it is amazing how education effects every area of our lives .

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Old, New and Unusual Alliances in the Middle East

Old, New and Unusual Alliances in the Middle East | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
A look at where Iran exerts influence across the region and at the emerging Saudi coalition.

Via David Lizotte, Seth Dixon
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David Lizotte's curator insight, March 31, 5:39 PM

This is a neat article just published March 30. It deals with Iranian influence in specific countries throughout the Middle Eastern region. The explanations are general and perhaps lack more depth however I believe the article is geared more towards people whom truly follow the news and are aware of geo-politics and other aspects of the Middle East. Personally, I am far from being an expert but I like to think I could hold a half way decent conversation in a coffee shop. The article is good in how its basically an overview of Iran and its widening grasp grasp of the Middle East. To complement the general facts are images, specifically maps. This gives more depth to the article because the reader can see the countries (if not truly aware of the geography) and gain more awareness of how Iran is involving itself in different regions. The article then shows the flip side of the coin in displaying the countries involved with the Saudi coalition in preventing the spread of Iranian influence.  Again, this complemented by a map. 

Upon displaying the two opposing sides the article then demonstrates alliances or at least commonalities in how certain countries are battling (on different levels of involvement) the Islamic State. 

Although general, geared towards a more versed/"up to date" audience of Middle Eastern relations this article is still informing and benefiting. It may also spark interest in regards to one reading more and forming a better understanding what the article is stating. For example, one might wonder whom are the Hezbollah and Houthis?  (aspects not explained in this article)

Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 8, 9:10 PM

From David Lizotte: "This is a neat article just published March 30. It deals with Iranian influence in specific countries throughout the Middle Eastern region. The explanations are general and perhaps lack more depth however I believe the article is geared more towards people whom truly follow the news and are aware of geo-politics and other aspects of the Middle East. Personally, I am far from being an expert but I like to think I could hold a half way decent conversation in a coffee shop. The article is good in how its basically an overview of Iran and its widening grasp grasp of the Middle East. To complement the general facts are images, specifically maps. This gives more depth to the article because the reader can see the countries (if not truly aware of the geography) and gain more awareness of how Iran is involving itself in different regions. The article then shows the flip side of the coin in displaying the countries involved with the Saudi coalition in preventing the spread of Iranian influence.  Again, this complemented by a map. 

Upon displaying the two opposing sides the article then demonstrates alliances or at least commonalities in how certain countries are battling (on different levels of involvement) the Islamic State. 

Although general, geared towards a more versed/"up to date" audience of Middle Eastern relations this article is still informing and benefiting. It may also spark interest in regards to one reading more and forming a better understanding what the article is stating. For example, one might wonder whom are the Hezbollah and Houthis?  (aspects not explained in this article)."


Treathyl Fox's comment, May 9, 11:08 AM
The article does NOT explain who the Hezbollah and Houthis are? Way to keep US in the dark! Good summary you wrote!
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The Precision Agriculture Revolution

The Precision Agriculture Revolution | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"Thousands of years ago, agriculture began as a highly site-specific activity. The first farmers were gardeners who nurtured individual plants, and they sought out the microclimates and patches of soil that favored those plants. But as farmers acquired scientific knowledge and mechanical expertise, they enlarged their plots, using standardized approaches—plowing the soil, spreading animal manure as fertilizer, rotating the crops from year to year—to boost crop yields. Over the years, they developed better methods of preparing the soil and protecting plants from insects and, eventually, machines to reduce the labor required. Starting in the nineteenth century, scientists invented chemical pesticides and used newly discovered genetic principles to select for more productive plants. Even though these methods maximized overall productivity, they led some areas within fields to underperform. Nonetheless, yields rose to once-unimaginable levels: for some crops, they increased tenfold from the nineteenth century to the present.  

Today, however, the trend toward ever more uniform practices is starting to reverse, thanks to what is known as 'precision agriculture.' Taking advantage of information technology, farmers can now collect precise data about their fields and use that knowledge to customize how they cultivate each square foot."

 

Tags: technology, food production, agriculture, agribusiness, spatial, GPS.


Via Seth Dixon
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Daniel Lindahl's curator insight, May 25, 12:54 PM

Farmers now have the ability to use a new process of "precision agriculture." This allows farmers to gain data on each area of land, thus creating even greater yields. 

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Vandals destroy dam, release 49 million gallons of water into Bay

Vandals destroy dam, release 49 million gallons of water into Bay | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Fremont police say vandals attacked an inflatable dam on Alameda Creek that resulted in the loss of nearly 50 million gallons of water.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 23, 10:11 AM

Because what's more fun than losing nearly 50 millions gallons of freshwater during a drought?  The selfishness of some can be so disheartening for the rest of the community. 

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Customizable Maps of Mexico

Customizable Maps of Mexico | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"Find worksheets about Geography of Mexico.  Hundreds of worksheets--millions of combinations."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 22, 9:58 PM

One of the problems with so many outline maps for classroom use is that, depending on your lesson plan, you might want it labeled, showing surrounding countries or in color...but maybe not.  This site let's you customize these simple maps that are perfect for the K-12 classroom (and yes, they have maps for all regions of the world).  


Tags: Mexico, K12, map, map archives

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A Puzzle That Takes You Around The Globe - NPR

A Puzzle That Takes You Around The Globe - NPR | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Every answer is the name of a country. For each word given, ignore the vowels. The consonants, in order from left to right, are the same consonants in the same order as in the country.
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Venice's Gondoliers Make Room For Wheelchairs

Venice's Gondoliers Make Room For Wheelchairs | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
A group of gondoliers in Venice have banded together to come up with a way for people in wheelchairs to enjoy that most Venetian of experiences.
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Henderson Waves: A Pedestrian Bridge Envisioned for Singapore

Henderson Waves: A Pedestrian Bridge Envisioned for Singapore | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

Arising from an international bridge design competition, Henderson Waves and other connections form part of a nine kilometer stretch of leisure destination that urban planners have envisioned for in the south of Singapore. This tallest pedestrian bridge and other elevated walkways creatively link up hills, parks and attractions to extend the green and recreational spaces available, bringing people closer to nature. 
Designed by RSP Architects Planners & Engineers Pte Ltd and IJP Corporation (UK), the 274 meter long bridge springs from a scenic location off Mount Faber to Telok Blangah. At 36 meters above Henderson Road, the bridge flows organically in seven wave spans, echoing the ridges’ profiles.


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Lola Ripollés's curator insight, May 16, 4:27 PM

La belleza de un puente peatonal de une parque y atracciones en una zona de ocio de Singapur.

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10 truly absurd features of contemporary geopolitics

10 truly absurd features of contemporary geopolitics | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"The U.N. Security Council. What’s Up With That?  And 9 other truly absurd features of contemporary geopolitics."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 8, 11:32 AM

"Some of these absurdities persist because they’ve been around a long time, or because powerful interests defend them vigorously, or because they align with broader social prejudices. Some of them may in fact be defensible, but we should still bring such oddities out into the open air on occasion and ask ourselves if they really make sense."


Tags: political, geopolitics.

LEONARDO WILD's curator insight, May 14, 9:13 AM

Absurdity is in the eyes of the beholder ... if the beholder doesn't understand what's behind the actions and behaviors of those who, in this case, are the face of the powers that move the world. The veil of absurdity gets lifted immediately when you take a look at the economic motivations and interconnections, as well as at the fact that politics is the Petri Dish of psychopathy—Look up: Political Ponerology, the subject matter of my new novel: THE GALAPAGOS AGENDA, coming out soon with Suspense Publishing (e-Book) and Story Merchants Books (print).

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5 Themes of Geography Notes animations


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Rich Schultz's curator insight, May 15, 4:57 PM

Gotta know those 5 themes of geography!

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Here’s why most world maps are really wrong

Here’s why most world maps are really wrong | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Most likely, Greenland isn’t nearly as big as you think. This graphic by Seth Kadish of Vizual Statistix shows how the area of Africa (in white) compares to the area of Greenland (in green) in 11 different map projections. Because the Earth is a sphere, picturing the globe on a two-dimensional map usually involves some […]

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A City For Abandoned Mothers In India

Thousands of widows have been making their way to the holy city of Vrindavan in northern India to spend the rest of their lonely lives. Cast out by their families, or simply alone in the world, some travel hundreds of miles to get there.

 

Tags: gender, India, SouthAsia,  culture.


Via Seth Dixon, Clairelouise
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Eden Eaves's curator insight, May 24, 5:10 PM

There are 15,000 widows living in the city of Vrindavan and most of them come from over 1300 km away; West Bengal. After their husbands death, these women have been beaten and tortured by their own children for money they don't have and have had to escape to this holy city for safety where, even though they are away from the beatings, they much beg and sing for money. Many wish for death over this humiliation. 

A woman, capable of bringing life into the world, should never be treated like this and especially by her own family. 

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Vertical villages are changing the concept of neighborhood

Vertical villages are changing the concept of neighborhood | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Multifamily dwellings in high-density areas are changing the concept of neighborhood.

 

Tags: housing, urban, place, neighborhood, spatial, density.


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Living in the Age of Airplanes

"LIVING IN THE AGE OF AIRPLANES is a story about how the airplane has changed the world. Filmed in 18 countries across all 7 continents, it renews our appreciation for one of the most extraordinary and awe-inspiring aspects of the modern world." airplanesmovie.com


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 1, 12:45 PM

I was absolutely delighted to see this film on the big screen...it was as visually stunning as any film I'd ever seen.  I and my young children were mesmerized.  So much of the modern world that we take for granted is absolutely revolutionary.  This is a great teacher's guide to teaching with this film.


Tags: transportation, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic, video, National Geographic, visualization.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 21, 10:41 AM

Summer reading KQ3 What are the major contributing factors to environmental change today?

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Proposed rule in China bans prominent Christian symbol

Proposed rule in China bans prominent Christian symbol | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Critics say the rapid growth of Christian groups have made the ruling Communist Party nervous
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