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What’s your local HDI (human development index)?

What’s your local HDI (human development index)? | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"A recently-released online tool enables Californians to see where they stand on a “human development index” – a composite measure of health, knowledge and standard of living developed by the American Human Development Project of the Social Sciences..." 

This is cool.  Instead of aggregating the data at the country level and comparing countries, we can see differences in local levels of human development.  Students see patterns of socio-economics and development vividly, and in an intensely local way tailored to their regional frame of reference.   


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Tracey Sarvis's curator insight, November 9, 2014 8:20 AM

Development and HDI

 

AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO
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GeoGuessr - Let's explore the world!

GeoGuessr - Let's explore the world! | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
GeoGuessr is a geography game which takes you on a journey around the world and challenges your ability to recognize your surroundings.

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Edelin Espino's curator insight, September 10, 2014 2:31 PM

This is a really cool game! You should play it.

Allison Henley's curator insight, September 10, 2014 2:35 PM

Very addicting even though I'm not that great at it!! haha

Matleena Laakso's curator insight, October 5, 2014 4:55 AM

Tämä on hauska, muutaman kerran on tullut "pelattua".

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Tide Makes Tombolo an Island

Tide Makes Tombolo an Island | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
The historic abbey of Mont Saint-Michel became an island on March 21 after a rare “supertide” flooded a causeway.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 25, 11:23 AM

Coastal physical geography produces some beautiful landforms such as tombolos.  A tombolo is created when sand deposits attach an island to a larger piece of land--think of it as special type of isthmus.  Mont St. Michel (picture above) is the world’s most famous example because of the iconic walled city with crowned with a striking medieval abbey.  As the tides fluctuated, the city and abbey were alternately connected or disconnected from the mainland.  However, a ‘super-tide’ that occurs once every 18.6 years wiped out the artificial causeway stranding motorists on France's most visited tourist destination (I wouldn't mind be stranded there right about now).  


Tags: water, physical, coastal, geomorphology, landformsFrance, tourism.

West Sound Tech Assn's curator insight, March 25, 8:32 PM

Not techy but very cool!

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Burma's bizarre capital: a super-sized slice of post-apocalypse suburbia

Burma's bizarre capital: a super-sized slice of post-apocalypse suburbia | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
The purpose-built city of Naypyidaw – unveiled a decade ago this year – boasts 20-lane highways, golf courses, fast Wi-Fi and reliable electricity. The only thing it doesn’t seem to have is people, report Matt Kennard and Claire Provost

 

Tags: Burma, Southeast Asia, urban, urbanism.


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Jacob McCullough's curator insight, March 23, 6:55 PM

This building is awesome, it truly shows the marvles of architecture and the difference culture and religion make on it 

Bella Reagan's curator insight, March 24, 2:28 AM

Unit 3 

Summary

In Burma's city Naypyidaw, there are huge infrastructures that seem random and surrounded by rural life on the outside of the high city. The city is six times the size of New York and it is built with huge highways, some even with twenty lanes. Also the city has good electricity and WiFi connections. The city sounds great excepts there are barely enough people to fill the city. The he highways are a waste of space almost with no omen using them. 

Insight

This strange city i every peculiar to me too. The Placement of this rich city in the middle of what used to be rural land is odd and I don;t see if benefiting them now but maybe in the future. The city may be nice with buildings ad infrastructures, but it seems fake to people. Like the hotels may seem nice but overall feel cheap as some people say. This city is very strange but I hope one day it will be put to good use.

 

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, March 25, 9:46 AM

unit 7

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Learn the secret history of NYC's buildings with this map

Learn the secret history of NYC's buildings with this map | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Shhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh...

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​‘Nature’s revenge’: Dead Sea surrounded by 3,000+ sinkholes growing at alarming rate

​‘Nature’s revenge’: Dead Sea surrounded by 3,000+ sinkholes growing at alarming rate | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Hundreds of sinkholes are forming each year around the drying Dead Sea that could face being completely parched by 2050. Its basin shrinks by a meter per year due to severe water mismanagement.

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Watch: Watch the Solar Eclipse at Super Speed

Sky gazers gathered in the town of Torshavn in the Faroe Islands to watch the total eclipse.
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Parades to Fear, Not Celebrate - New York Times

Parades to Fear, Not Celebrate - New York Times | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
The many grandiose spectacles of military might in Asia this year make the region more insecure.
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Many mesmerized by solar eclipse

Many mesmerized by solar eclipse | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
In Britain, all eyes were up, fixed at the sky to observe a solar eclipse. Adults to schoolchildren gazed in wonder as the moon obscured part of the sun from Earth's view. Charlie D'Agata rounds up the best images of the spectacle.
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xkcd: Upside-Down Map

xkcd: Upside-Down Map | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 18, 12:30 PM

My brain now hurts. 


Bonnie Bracey Sutton's curator insight, March 18, 12:58 PM

I love the projections.. Fun to teach.

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Discover 100 Great Works of Art with Videos Created by Khan Academy & Google Art Project

Discover 100 Great Works of Art with Videos Created by Khan Academy & Google Art Project | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
If you have an interest in how the internet has widened the very concept of education, you may well know about Google's Art Project, a digital wealth of free visual art information and viewing opportunities we've featured before.

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Looking For Real-World Math Problems? Try Google Earth!

Looking For Real-World Math Problems? Try Google Earth! | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Aiming to get kids to understand and solve real-world math problems, one teacher developed a tool that uses Google Earth.

 

Tags: math, google.


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Anna Sasaki's curator insight, March 22, 2:42 PM

There is a new programme which helps students truly understand the usage of math skills being taught in school. It is a game that students may play, which actually put the math skills learned in school into play. This solves the time old question of "when will I ever use this?" It is very fun and uses Google maps to manifest questions for each sections from grades 5-10. It is putting more use of the Google maps and helps others learn about geography as it is using the maps.

This shows another way to use Google maps, which uses a GIS system to track locations. The online maps presents many different opportunities of teaching others, through various methods, and geography can be present in any topic shown. Geography can help others learn through spatial recognition in the case of math, and many other ideas.

Woodstock School's curator insight, March 23, 1:39 AM

“Pray tell us, what's your favorite number?"...
"Shiva jumped up to the board, uninvited, and wrote 10,213,223"...
"And pray, why would this number interest us?"
"It is the only number that describes itself when you read it, 'One zero, two ones, three twos, two threes'.”
― Abraham Varghese, Cutting for Stone  

Matthew Connealy's curator insight, March 23, 10:26 PM

The use of Google Earth is becoming beneficial to Thomas Petra, a middle school teacher that is trying to make learning more interesting. By using Google Earth, he is able to teach lessons in a more interactive and applicable way. An example of this would be when his students learned about distance through the Alaskan dog sledders and their travels. The students are able to learn much more than the conventional way of learning and are able to gain a better sense of the phenomena around them.

 

Although this was used in a mathematical setting, Google Earth is only just beginning. Geography students would greatly benefit from this usage of the app, and more teachers should learn to harness this style of teaching. Students will be able to gain a better sense of what is going on around them, and know more about the world they live in.

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On St. Patrick’s Day, Mexico remembers the Irishmen who fought for Mexico against the US

On St. Patrick’s Day, Mexico remembers the Irishmen who fought for Mexico against the US | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Amid the celebrations this St Patrick's Day, there are also more somber commemorations taking place. In Mexico and in a small town in Galway, Ireland, they are remembering the hundreds of Irishmen who died fighting for Mexico against the United States: the San Patricio Battalion.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 18, 10:20 AM

On St. Patrick's Day and afterward, many people shared happy pictures of Ireland, and that's lovely but I wanted this story.  This is not a well-known story in the United States because it reveals the cultural prejudice against the Irish that was prevalent in the United States in the 1840s.  I first learned about them in Mexico City, walking by a monument, that memorialized St. Patrick's Battalion.  They were a group of soldiers that deserted from the U.S. army and chose to fight with their Catholic brethren on the Mexican side.  


Questions to Ponder: Why are these historical events not usually mentioned in the U.S. national narrative?  Why is this seen as very significant for Mexican national identity?  What were the 'axes of identity' that mattered most to the those in St. Patrick's Battalion?   

 

Tags ethnicitywar, Mexico, Irish, racismreligion.

Connor Hendricks's curator insight, March 23, 4:40 PM

This is a good way to show how countries can work togeter and respect each other. A group of irishmen fought to defend mexico during the Mexican-American war

 

Jacob McCullough's curator insight, March 23, 6:44 PM

This is definitely interesting this breakers down cultural barricades and sets inside differences 

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Ten Geographic Ideas that Changed the World

Ten Geographic Ideas that Changed the World | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Adapted from the book by Professor Susan Hanson...

 


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 29, 2013 9:40 AM

This is an excellent review/summary of an edited volume that shows the value of geographic thought and its importance in the modern world.  This review conveniently gives a one paragraph synopsis of each chapter.  It does not need to be read chronologically, so you can pick and choose what you find relevant to your course.  The top 10 are (in order of inclusion in the book): the Idea of the Map, the Weather Map, GIS, Human Adjustment, Water Budget Climatology, Human Transformation of the Earth, Spatial Organization and Interdependence, Central Place Theory, Megalopolis and Sense of Place.

Seth Forman's curator insight, March 23, 5:24 PM

Summary: This article demonstrated how geographic concepts have been able to change daily life for humans everywhere. It talked about the log term effect of many life changing geographic concepts, such as how maps have influenced weather forecasts which have become an important part of daily life.

 

Insight:  This article showed me how important geographic processes can be on daily life.  It also demonstrates that nearly everyone in a developed country today relies on their ability to read geographic information even in something as simple as a weather map.

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Viva Gentrification!

Viva Gentrification! | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"In Highland Park, as in other Latino barrios of Los Angeles, gentrification has produced an undeniable but little appreciated side effect: the end of decades of de facto racial segregation. It's possible to imagine a future in which 'the hood' passes into memory.  Racial integration is on the upswing.  For all the fortitude and pride you'll find in Latino barrios, no one wants to live in a racially segregated community or attend a racially segregated school."  

 

Tags: neighborhood, gentrification, urban, place, culture, economic, California, Los Angeles.

 


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Egypt, Ethiopia and Sudan sign deal to end Nile dispute

Egypt, Ethiopia and Sudan sign deal to end Nile dispute | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Three African leaders sign an initial deal to end a long-running dispute over the sharing of Nile waters and the building of Africa's biggest hydroelectric dam.

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Luis Cesar Nunes's curator insight, March 25, 6:46 AM

Long way river

rodrick rajive lal's curator insight, March 26, 3:40 AM

The tripartite dispute on the sharingof the waters of the Nile between Egypt, Sudan and Ethiopia was an ongoing issue that failed to get resolved for decades. Now it seems the three countries have finally managed to settle their disputes. Earlier there was alot of mudlsinging  accusations and counter accusations, and blamegames where particular countries would blame droughts and other humanitarian disasters on others saying that they had held back the water that was due to them. In a region that is often under the state of drought, jusdicious sharing of the waters of the Nile, both the Blue Nile and the White Nile will help put an end to the suffering of common people!

Bob Beaven's curator insight, March 26, 2:40 PM

The Nile is a very touch subject for the countries involved in the deal, because they all believe that they have a right to it.  Historically, Egypt was associated most with the river, and the Ancient Egyptians even had many myths surrounding the river as the giver of life.  However, Sudan and Ethiopia are looking towards the river as something that can generate hydroelectric power which would be beneficial to these countries.  The reason why Egypt worries is because it believes that if too much of the river is diverted or blocked then it will not get enough water to sustain the country.  Keep in mind, Egypt is called the "Gem of the Nile".  I do believe that the treaty that was signed is a step in the right direction however, all the countries should be able to share the Nile and use it.  I would oppose the policy if it became detrimental to the survival of Egypt however.  The main factor of the project that keeps it from being destructive is that the river will only be slightly diverted (and  it is a tributary in question the Blue Nile).  Yet, like we have learned in class rivers are very touchy subjects for many nations, not just African ones.

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Roam the World in (Almost) Real Time

Roam the World in (Almost) Real Time | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
A groundbreaking Mapbox project ushers in a new era for online cartography.

 

On Google Earth, the seasons rarely change. Most anywhere a digital traveler goes, the sky is cloudless and the grass is green. No snow on the ground in Iowa. No fire in Valparaiso. It's a big gap between the world as it is and as it's mapped.

Launched Thursday,a landmark project from Mapbox has changed the summertime paradigm for online cartography. Landsat-live reveals the planet's surface in real time and in stunning resolution, fed by a constant stream of public-domain imagery from NASA’s Landsat 8 satellite.


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YEC Geo's curator insight, March 23, 11:59 AM

This sounds really cool.

 

UPDATE:  I've had a chance to look at this. 

 

Cool things:  great images.

 

Not so cool:  It's not a substitute for Google Earth.   You can only pan out or in to a limited degree, so to go from Texas to Timbuctoo, for example, would take a lot of clicking and dragging.  Best way to get to a place is to type it in the search box.  No 3-D view also. And if there are a lot of clouds when the image was taken, they'll obscure the landscape.

 

That being said, if you want to see large-scale, recent images of a particular place, it's a good site. 

Seth Forman's curator insight, March 23, 4:34 PM

Summary: This interesting article talks a lot about modern technologies effect on the popularity of geography. This article talks about how programs like Google Earth have caused a general interest to arise about physical geography.

 

Insight: This article is significant to unit 1 because it shows how GIS can be so influential to not only geographers but to the rest of society.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, March 25, 12:16 PM

unit 1

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World's Most Dangerous Walkway Set To Reopen Next Week

World's Most Dangerous Walkway Set To Reopen Next Week | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Thrill-seekers who really want to walk on the wild side need to head to southern Spain ASAP. There, in the village of El Chorro, they will find Caminito del Rey, aka the world's most dangerous walkway.

Previously closed for repairs to fix deterio...

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New genetic study of UK shows 10,000 years of immigration and invasions

New genetic study of UK shows 10,000 years of immigration and invasions | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
New research, published this week, shows how waves of invasions shaped the white population of Britain.

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On the Road Again: Mapping All the Cities in Willie Nelson's Songs

On the Road Again: Mapping All the Cities in Willie Nelson's Songs | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
"City of New Orleans" isn't a song about New Orleans. It's a song about a train called the City of New Orleans. Willie Nelson didn't write it. But he made it a Grammy Award-winning hit in 1984.
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The best views of the total solar eclipse

The best views of the total solar eclipse | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Couldn't make it to Svalbard for the eclipse? See video from Europe, an image from space and one viral pic not to be believed
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Europe Goes Dark

Europe Goes Dark | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
On Friday, Europe will experience a total solar eclipse for a few hours in the morning. The last time an eclipse of this scale happened in Europe was in 1999. Back then Germany got less than 1 percent of its power from solar energy.
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Rhode Island State Bee

Rhode Island State Bee | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

Friday, March 27, 2015, 1pm Registration
Sapinsley Auditorium, The Nazarian Center, Rhode Island College
Whether you are a competing student, a teacher, a parent or an interested member of the public, we invite you to the attend your state's National Geographic Bee on March 27, 2015. Here you will find all information needed to prepare for and enjoy a day of exciting academic competition among the grade 4-8 school champions of the state. Attend the state Bee to see who will go on to compete in the national championship at National Geographic in Washington, D.C.


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Ebola-hit Sierra Leone to lock down 2.5 million people (Update)

Ebola-hit Sierra Leone to lock down 2.5 million people (Update) | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Sierra Leone said Thursday it will confine around 2.5 million people to their homes across the capital and in the north in a three-day shutdown aimed at stemming the Ebola epidemic.

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[Torino, Italy] A new house has put down its roots in Turin : 25 Green / Luciano Pia

[Torino, Italy] A new house has put down its roots in Turin : 25 Green  / Luciano Pia | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

Architects: Luciano Pia
Location: Via Gabriele Chiabrera, 25, 10126 Torino, Italy
Area: 7500.0 sqm
Year: 2012
Photographs: Beppe Giardino


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Wargaming: computerized scenario planning

Stratfor conducted extensive scenario planning when considering Russia's offensive military options toward Ukraine. In this video some of the broader themes and deduction will be examined.

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Stephen Zimmett's curator insight, March 17, 4:24 PM

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Daniel Rasmus's curator insight, March 19, 6:37 PM

Interesting exploration of what Russia might do in Eastern Europe. Great examples of scenario planning - facts and how things might work. Eliminate the impossible and reveal the real options.

Norka McAlister's curator insight, March 25, 9:05 PM

Technology can be useful when designing strategies and making political decisions when war hits countries. War-gaming can be helpful for Ukraine and even for Russian governments on how to refine their military and political strategies during war. It simulates the question &what if& and can be tested without being hazardous for any one. In fact, war-gaming integrates all possibilities of how and what things can be done and also can narrow to a few options. Computerized animation models help and allow for the construction and display of a lot of options of how things can be done and what can not be. War-gaming can even be useful in predicting what may be happen in the near future.

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25 NAP's that explain the English language

From Beowulf to Wikipedia, here's how English grew, spread, and changed.

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Terminology Coordination of the European Parliament's curator insight, March 17, 5:46 AM

English is everywhere. It's spoken in dozens of countries around the world. It reflects the influences of centuries of international exchange. Here are 25 maps through which to understand the origins of English and how it evolved into the different languages spoken today.