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What’s your local HDI (human development index)?

What’s your local HDI (human development index)? | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"A recently-released online tool enables Californians to see where they stand on a “human development index” – a composite measure of health, knowledge and standard of living developed by the American Human Development Project of the Social Sciences..." 

This is cool.  Instead of aggregating the data at the country level and comparing countries, we can see differences in local levels of human development.  Students see patterns of socio-economics and development vividly, and in an intensely local way tailored to their regional frame of reference.   


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Tracey Sarvis's curator insight, November 9, 2014 8:20 AM

Development and HDI

 

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GeoGuessr - Let's explore the world!

GeoGuessr - Let's explore the world! | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
GeoGuessr is a geography game which takes you on a journey around the world and challenges your ability to recognize your surroundings.

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Edelin Espino's curator insight, September 10, 2014 2:31 PM

This is a really cool game! You should play it.

Allison Henley's curator insight, September 10, 2014 2:35 PM

Very addicting even though I'm not that great at it!! haha

Matleena Laakso's curator insight, October 5, 2014 4:55 AM

Tämä on hauska, muutaman kerran on tullut "pelattua".

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A bird's-eye view of war-torn Syria

A bird's-eye view of war-torn Syria | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
A school that lays in ruins, hospitals and refugee camps under attack, and a city center with the size of Manhattan destroyed by shelling — these are some of the shocking details of a new United Nations report on the conflict in Syria, four years after in began.

 

Tags: Syria, MiddleEast, conflict, political, remote sensing.


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Kyle Freeman's curator insight, March 23, 10:43 PM

This is an interesting article as it provides many before and after photos of conflict on the Syrian landscape. The distribution of the contestants for Syria is also interesting. The Kurds up at the top are not that far into Syria but have taken up a small portion. The Syrian government forces have large concentrations around the major cities that have not already been taken. The orange rebels (many different rebel groups) have taken a large portion of land between the two cities called Aleppo and Hama. While ISIS has taken Deir al-Zour, a city on the Euphrates river, which will provide a better farming area and source of natural water to use. This armed conflict is interesting because there are four factions at play all looking for a different goal. ISIS is on a religious quest to create an Islamic State. The kurds simply want a state of their own. The rebels are interested in overthrowing the current Syrian government where the Syrian government clearly doesn't want that to happen. All of these conflicting views has turned Syria into a battleground.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, March 25, 12:17 PM

unit 4

Norka McAlister's curator insight, March 25, 9:13 PM

It is heartbreaking to see these images from the satellite of how Syrian lands were devastated after massive shelling to different cities. Infrastructure had been destroyed and also left many causalities in multiple areas. Cities have been reshaped due to excessive migration of citizens to neighboring countries such as Jordan, Lebanon, Turkey, and Iraq. Around 3 million Syrian citizens have migrated since the conflict started between the rebellious Syrian government and terrorist Islamic state. Targeted cities such as as Aleppo suffered the most damage in the attacks. Refugee camps have stared to resemble big cities. Syrian citizens are living in makeshift camps, however refugee camps are supposed to be provisional but they have become permanent places to live in order to ensure survival.

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SaskatcheWHAT?!

"How well do you know your Saskatchewan slang? At Insightrix in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, we've got the prairies down flat!"


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 12, 1:26 PM

Here's an entertaining clip on different regionalized vocabularies and a hint of accent confusion thrown in there.  The portrayal is over the top, but it's all local vocabulary that life-long residents certainly understand.  Here's 320 more Canadian slang terms for you (scroll to the bottom).    


TagsCanada, language, fun.

LEONARDO WILD's curator insight, March 29, 11:14 AM

Live languages are never as straight forward as the Royal Academies of Language would like them to be. Rules are crystallizations that get shattered in daily use.

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These maps show what could happen next in Yemen - and how it could impact ... - Business Insider

These maps show what could happen next in Yemen - and how it could impact ... - Business Insider | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Yemen's conflict explained through maps.
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Where Americans live now, in 4 maps - Washington Post (blog)

Where Americans live now, in 4 maps - Washington Post (blog) | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Basically: Cool maps.
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The Speed Burden [Costs of Sprawl]

The Speed Burden [Costs of Sprawl] | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
The need for speed devours huge chunks of American cities and leaves the edges of the expressways worthless. Busy streets, for almost all of human history, created the greatest real estate value because they delivered customers and clients to the businesses operating there. This in turn cultivated the highest tax revenues in town, both from higher property taxes and from elevated sales taxes. But you can't set up shop on the side of an expressway. How can cities afford to spend so much to create thoroughfares with no adjoining property value?

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Alex Lewis's curator insight, March 10, 10:23 AM

This article shows the difference between extremely urbanized areas and relatively urbanized areas. Florence and Atlanta are compared. Florence has narrow streets with sharp intersections, which causes cars to drive slowly. This is safer for pedestrians. In Atlanta, the roads are wider and curves are less sharp. The most this will do is help people in Atlanta get tp their jobs slightly faster. Miami and a seaside town are also compared. The interstate in Miami takes up most of the room and there is few real estate options. In the seaside town, options are not limited, around 80% available for use. The less urbanized places are more efficient. 

 

-A.L.

Alexa Earl's curator insight, March 14, 10:48 AM

This blog really made me realize what an impact humans are to the environment. They compare different cities and talk about the impacts and it really showed me how humans have built up cities.

Brian Wilk's curator insight, March 21, 6:12 PM

A side by side comparison at first blush is striking but the devil is in the details. Florence, Italy is a city of only 368,000 while the Atlanta metro area is about 4.5 million. Agree that sprawl is ineffective real estate and efficiency wise, but fuel prices may be having a counter effect on the reduction of sprawl. It is much less expensive to commute given the price of oil at its current levels and the millennials will have a say in this urban sprawl contracting or expanding. Many do not own cars, relying on commuter systems within the city to get around. This in theory should drive down demand for fossil fuels, culminating in reduced prices for gasoline. If the infrastructure is already built, was is the cost to maintain it, given the static population of the large metro areas? Interesting to see how this plays out.

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These 22 Far Away Perspectives Of Famous Places Will Change The Way You See Them Forever

These 22 Far Away Perspectives Of Famous Places Will Change The Way You See Them Forever | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

AmaMany of us only know the world's most famous landmarks through images that show them in all their beautiful, historical glory. The world has changed since these structures were built, so the surrounding landscapes might not be what you'd expect. 


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Nancy Watson's curator insight, March 23, 2014 8:50 PM

Amazing from a different perspective

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Road from Europe to U.S.? Russia proposes superhighway

Road from Europe to U.S.? Russia proposes superhighway | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
London to New York City by car? It could happen if the head of Russian Railways has his way.

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Norka McAlister's curator insight, March 28, 3:18 PM

This proposed plan seems to be very attractive, but the cost to complete this project will be enormous and the question is who will be financially responsible for this project?. On the other hand,  the superhighway would bring many opportunities in terms of business to different countries, and also to a many local communities. We are talking about how this project would open a variety of trade in tourist, transportation, and local business at different points of the superhighway. However, one downfall would be the borders, in that it will provide more opportunities for terrorism and other illicit activites. To be able to accomplish and put together this project, every country needs to agree on making easy policies between borders such as tariff, taxes, and inforce security, etc. Each country would have to work together to do their part under the agreeement. However, Russia is firm in what they want and could cause tension if their demands are not fulfilled. 

Brian Wilk's curator insight, March 29, 8:04 AM

Really? A twelve thousand mile roadway built through some of the roughest terrain known to man, through some of the least populated areas in the world, linking areas that have no development or tourist attractions? What a great idea....

The cost of this road would be in the trillions and who is going to fund this? What economic benefits will be derived from this undertaking? I don't know about you, but my dream trip would be to drive through Alaska for about 12 hours so I could see snowbanks, and then, wait for it, drive about nine thousand miles through more snowbanks, to reach Moscow, a viable attraction. Sounds legit to me! I have an incredibly original idea on how to accomplish this differently; fly there!

Think about what the average person would have to do to embark on this trip; passport, visas, an incredible amount of money to pay for the gas, an incredible amount of time to do this. A 12k trip @ 60 mph is on the order of 200 hours of driving, without stopping. Eight hours a day of driving gets you just this side of a month's worth of time.

Use your airline points, fly to Moscow, drink some Absolut, have a bowl of Borscht soup and spend some rubles on tourist attractions. Leave the driving to the Formula One organization.

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, April 1, 10:28 AM

I cannot see a superhighway, as proposed here, ever coming to fruition.  There are too many countries involved, first off.  Secondly, this would take massive amounts of coordination and planning and Russia, western Europe, and the U.S. cannot agree about a little strip of land in Ukraine, never mind agreeing on specifics for a 13,000 mile long highway.  It is interesting to look at and dream of but I cannot see it happening.

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A Big Bach Download: The Complete Organ Works for Free

A Big Bach Download: The Complete Organ Works for Free | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
We mentioned this one long ago, and it's time to mention it again: You can download for free the complete organ works of Johann Sebastian Bach. They were recorded by Dr. James Kibbie (University of Michigan) on original baroque organs in Leipzig, Germany.

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Viva Gentrification!

Viva Gentrification! | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"In Highland Park, as in other Latino barrios of Los Angeles, gentrification has produced an undeniable but little appreciated side effect: the end of decades of de facto racial segregation. It's possible to imagine a future in which 'the hood' passes into memory.  Racial integration is on the upswing.  For all the fortitude and pride you'll find in Latino barrios, no one wants to live in a racially segregated community or attend a racially segregated school."  

 

Tags: neighborhood, gentrification, urban, place, culture, economic, California, Los Angeles.

 


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Egypt, Ethiopia and Sudan sign deal to end Nile dispute

Egypt, Ethiopia and Sudan sign deal to end Nile dispute | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Three African leaders sign an initial deal to end a long-running dispute over the sharing of Nile waters and the building of Africa's biggest hydroelectric dam.

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Bob Beaven's curator insight, March 26, 2:40 PM

The Nile is a very touch subject for the countries involved in the deal, because they all believe that they have a right to it.  Historically, Egypt was associated most with the river, and the Ancient Egyptians even had many myths surrounding the river as the giver of life.  However, Sudan and Ethiopia are looking towards the river as something that can generate hydroelectric power which would be beneficial to these countries.  The reason why Egypt worries is because it believes that if too much of the river is diverted or blocked then it will not get enough water to sustain the country.  Keep in mind, Egypt is called the "Gem of the Nile".  I do believe that the treaty that was signed is a step in the right direction however, all the countries should be able to share the Nile and use it.  I would oppose the policy if it became detrimental to the survival of Egypt however.  The main factor of the project that keeps it from being destructive is that the river will only be slightly diverted (and  it is a tributary in question the Blue Nile).  Yet, like we have learned in class rivers are very touchy subjects for many nations, not just African ones.

Norka McAlister's curator insight, March 28, 3:20 PM

Three countries (Egypt, Ethiopia, Sudan) finally agreed upon Nile river distribution, ending the ongoing dispute. The building of the dam will  bring many jobs and opportunites to the residents of Ethoiopia. It will  benefit all residents who live near by the Nile river area. The construction of the hydroelectric dam in Ethiopia will benefit its regions. However,  regions upstream, like Egypt, are more concerned about the changes in the river pattern, environmental effects, and pollution due to the construction of the dam. Many people who live and are dependet on the river will have to look for opportunites somewhere else and there is predicted to be a massive migration of highly populated communities. Even when all three countries agreed upon the dam project, the Egyptian govertment wants to ensure that this will &not cause any harm to downstream countries& which is still their biggest concern of the future. 

Jared Medeiros's curator insight, March 29, 4:43 PM

  Glad to see that these countries could come to an agreement on a very large issue.  The Nile is the lifeline for this part of the world and nobody takes its importance lightly or for granted.  This is the type of thing that could put countries at war with one another, so its refreshing to see countries in this part of the world working together to try to improve their livliehoods rather than kill each other over resources.

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Roam the World in (Almost) Real Time

Roam the World in (Almost) Real Time | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
A groundbreaking Mapbox project ushers in a new era for online cartography.

 

On Google Earth, the seasons rarely change. Most anywhere a digital traveler goes, the sky is cloudless and the grass is green. No snow on the ground in Iowa. No fire in Valparaiso. It's a big gap between the world as it is and as it's mapped.

Launched Thursday,a landmark project from Mapbox has changed the summertime paradigm for online cartography. Landsat-live reveals the planet's surface in real time and in stunning resolution, fed by a constant stream of public-domain imagery from NASA’s Landsat 8 satellite.


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YEC Geo's curator insight, March 23, 11:59 AM

This sounds really cool.

 

UPDATE:  I've had a chance to look at this. 

 

Cool things:  great images.

 

Not so cool:  It's not a substitute for Google Earth.   You can only pan out or in to a limited degree, so to go from Texas to Timbuctoo, for example, would take a lot of clicking and dragging.  Best way to get to a place is to type it in the search box.  No 3-D view also. And if there are a lot of clouds when the image was taken, they'll obscure the landscape.

 

That being said, if you want to see large-scale, recent images of a particular place, it's a good site. 

Seth Forman's curator insight, March 23, 4:34 PM

Summary: This interesting article talks a lot about modern technologies effect on the popularity of geography. This article talks about how programs like Google Earth have caused a general interest to arise about physical geography.

 

Insight: This article is significant to unit 1 because it shows how GIS can be so influential to not only geographers but to the rest of society.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, March 25, 12:16 PM

unit 1

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World's Most Dangerous Walkway Set To Reopen Next Week

World's Most Dangerous Walkway Set To Reopen Next Week | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Thrill-seekers who really want to walk on the wild side need to head to southern Spain ASAP. There, in the village of El Chorro, they will find Caminito del Rey, aka the world's most dangerous walkway.

Previously closed for repairs to fix deterio...

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Quiz on the Differences Between Sunni and Shia Islam

Quiz on the Differences Between Sunni and Shia Islam | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Most of the world's major religions are made up of multiple sects or denominations, and Islam is no different. Islam's two major sects are the Sunnis and the Shiites, and the division and interplay between the two is a major factor in the geopolitics of the Middle East. How well do you understand Sunni and Shiite Islam? Take our quiz and find out!

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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, March 25, 9:45 AM

unit 3

BEAULIEU ADRIEN's curator insight, March 26, 5:53 AM

Comprenez la différence entre sunnites et shiites facilement grace à cet article;

Jared Medeiros's curator insight, March 29, 4:17 PM

 A nice little quiz that tests your knowledge on Sunni and Shia Islam.  I myself scored a 69 so there is much to learn for me on the differences between the 2.  The Shia are thought of as the more extreme of the two sects, so I was shocked to see that Hussein and Bin Ladin were both Sunni.  The complications between these two are important to know about as they are making headlines in world news.  Its tough to understand these people when you know nothing about their history.

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Map - Where the US grows its crops

Map - Where the US grows its crops | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

One of the most beautiful maps I know! Where the #US grows its crops (by the fantastic: http://bit.ly/1DEL9iX ) pic.twitter.com/FdOAJwozuq


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Maps - Africa is getting more democratic

Maps - Africa is getting more democratic | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

#Africa is turning democratic. From my project: http://bit.ly/1DkpYjW pic.twitter.com/oWlsQfl5cM


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Cornfields, Trees, and Water: Mapping the Rest of America - CityLab

Cornfields, Trees, and Water: Mapping the Rest of America - CityLab | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Most maps of the U.S. prioritize cities. But "Minimal Maps" single out the nation's forests, crops, and waterbodies.
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iScore5 APHG


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 26, 9:00 AM

iScore5, the app for AP Human Geography is now available in the Apple Store for $4.99. With five levels of questions at increasing difficulty, bonus and double bonus rounds and a study mode with extensive vocabulary, APHG students and teachers alike will find this a great test prep resource and a fun and engaging way to help students earn that 5 (open disclosure--I was a part of the team that developed content for the app, but am NOT receiving any money for promoting it.  I'm sharing it because I'm excited about this new resource).  


Tags: APHG, teacher training, edtech.

Christopher L. Story's curator insight, March 27, 9:59 AM

just an option

Dustin Fowler's curator insight, March 27, 10:16 AM

For 5 bucks?  Might be worth looking into.  Especially if you have a class set of iPads. 

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America's romance with sprawl may be over

America's romance with sprawl may be over | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Three years after the recession officially ended, Census county population estimates show Americans are staying put or moving to cities.

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Map Projections

Map Projections | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

A map projection is used to portray all or part of the round Earth on a flat surface. This cannot be done without some distortion.  Every projection has its own set of advantages and disadvantages. There is no "best" projection.  The mapmaker must select the one best suited to the needs, reducing distortion of the most important features.  Mapmakers and mathematicians have devised almost limitless ways to project the image of the globe onto paper. Scientists at the U. S. Geological Survey have designed projections for their specific needs—such as the Space Oblique Mercator, which allows mapping from satellites with little or no distortion.  This document gives the key properties, characteristics, and preferred uses of many historically important projections and of those frequently used by mapmakers today.


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Carlee Allen's curator insight, March 26, 6:58 PM

This article explains and talks about 18 specific map projections. It gives a lot of detail about all of them, and describes the disadvantages and uses for all of them.

 

I thought that this was interesting because I learned more about map projections, and actually how people use them.

Ruth Reynolds's curator insight, March 27, 2:05 AM

This is so useful for primary students

Christopher L. Story's curator insight, March 27, 9:59 AM

Some review help

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Video - Dumb cities make people sick

Over the last century, cities have been designed to accommodate the automobile. So, how do we redesign them to benefit people?

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Rise and Fall of the Ottoman Empire

Rise and Fall of the Ottoman Empire | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"Animated GIF map chronicling the rise and fall of the Ottoman Empire." 


Tags: empire, devolution, Middle East, borders, historical, map.


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Jared Medeiros's curator insight, March 29, 3:54 PM

A cool interactive that shows the landscape of the rise and fall of a powerful empire.  The Ottoman Empire had itself a decent run lasting more than 500 years, which is longer than The U.S. has been around.  Interesting to see the sprawl of the Empire and to see how certain areas were obtained and lost multiple times.  It looks like the European colonization of African countries really regressed the Empires power hold there.

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Tide Makes Tombolo an Island

Tide Makes Tombolo an Island | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
The historic abbey of Mont Saint-Michel became an island on March 21 after a rare “supertide” flooded a causeway.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 25, 11:23 AM

Coastal physical geography produces some beautiful landforms such as tombolos.  A tombolo is created when sand deposits attach an island to a larger piece of land--think of it as special type of isthmus.  Mont St. Michel (picture above) is the world’s most famous example because of the iconic walled city with crowned with a striking medieval abbey.  As the tides fluctuated, the city and abbey were alternately connected or disconnected from the mainland.  However, a ‘super-tide’ that occurs once every 18.6 years wiped out the artificial causeway stranding motorists on France's most visited tourist destination (I wouldn't mind be stranded there right about now).  


Tags: water, physical, coastal, geomorphology, landformsFrance, tourism.

West Sound Tech Assn's curator insight, March 25, 8:32 PM

Not techy but very cool!

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Burma's bizarre capital: a super-sized slice of post-apocalypse suburbia

Burma's bizarre capital: a super-sized slice of post-apocalypse suburbia | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
The purpose-built city of Naypyidaw – unveiled a decade ago this year – boasts 20-lane highways, golf courses, fast Wi-Fi and reliable electricity. The only thing it doesn’t seem to have is people, report Matt Kennard and Claire Provost

 

Tags: Burma, Southeast Asia, urban, urbanism.


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Bella Reagan's curator insight, March 24, 2:28 AM

Unit 3 

Summary

In Burma's city Naypyidaw, there are huge infrastructures that seem random and surrounded by rural life on the outside of the high city. The city is six times the size of New York and it is built with huge highways, some even with twenty lanes. Also the city has good electricity and WiFi connections. The city sounds great excepts there are barely enough people to fill the city. The he highways are a waste of space almost with no omen using them. 

Insight

This strange city i every peculiar to me too. The Placement of this rich city in the middle of what used to be rural land is odd and I don;t see if benefiting them now but maybe in the future. The city may be nice with buildings ad infrastructures, but it seems fake to people. Like the hotels may seem nice but overall feel cheap as some people say. This city is very strange but I hope one day it will be put to good use.

 

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, March 25, 9:46 AM

unit 7

Norka McAlister's curator insight, March 28, 3:16 PM

What went wrong in making Burma not attractive to tourists or corporate businesses? There are so many reasons for this empty capital. The government spent $4 billion on infrastructure repair, roads and even an airport for better capital in Burma. However, the regime in the region make the city non functional. A modern city with many amenities was, in reality, built for governmental purpose. Furthermore, the system threatened its residents and abused them, stripping them of their human rights. For a city to be functional with so much potential in areas such as infrastructure, there needs to be better leaders to reboost the economy in order to attract more people. There are a lot of strategies that the government has to implement to be able to succeed and start to compete with big cities around the world. Unfortunately, so far their efforts seem to produce nothing but failure.

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Learn the secret history of NYC's buildings with this map

Learn the secret history of NYC's buildings with this map | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Shhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh...

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​‘Nature’s revenge’: Dead Sea surrounded by 3,000+ sinkholes growing at alarming rate

​‘Nature’s revenge’: Dead Sea surrounded by 3,000+ sinkholes growing at alarming rate | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Hundreds of sinkholes are forming each year around the drying Dead Sea that could face being completely parched by 2050. Its basin shrinks by a meter per year due to severe water mismanagement.

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