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What’s your local HDI (human development index)?

What’s your local HDI (human development index)? | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"A recently-released online tool enables Californians to see where they stand on a “human development index” – a composite measure of health, knowledge and standard of living developed by the American Human Development Project of the Social Sciences..." 

This is cool.  Instead of aggregating the data at the country level and comparing countries, we can see differences in local levels of human development.  Students see patterns of socio-economics and development vividly, and in an intensely local way tailored to their regional frame of reference.   


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Tracey Sarvis's curator insight, November 9, 2014 8:20 AM

Development and HDI

 

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GeoGuessr - Let's explore the world!

GeoGuessr - Let's explore the world! | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
GeoGuessr is a geography game which takes you on a journey around the world and challenges your ability to recognize your surroundings.

Via Seth Dixon
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Edelin Espino's curator insight, September 10, 2014 2:31 PM

This is a really cool game! You should play it.

Allison Henley's curator insight, September 10, 2014 2:35 PM

Very addicting even though I'm not that great at it!! haha

Matleena Laakso's curator insight, October 5, 2014 4:55 AM

Tämä on hauska, muutaman kerran on tullut "pelattua".

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Balikatan - Standing shoulder-to-wary-shoulder in the South China Sea

Balikatan - Standing shoulder-to-wary-shoulder in the South China Sea | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

To take just one example, new analysis of satellite images of Fiery Cross Reef in the Spratly archipelago shows that the feature, all but two rocks of which used to be submerged at high tide, is now three times bigger than the largest natural island in the Spratlys. It boasts 80 buildings and three cement plants. The port is being improved, with five new piers and several barges, including a crane barge. Construction of a 3,110 metre (1.9 miles) airstrip is estimated to be one-third complete. All of this seems to flout the spirit and probably the letter of an agreement China reached in 2002 with the ten-member Association of South-East Asian Nations (which includes Brunei, Malaysia, the Philippines and Vietnam) “to exercise self-restraint in the conduct of activities that would complicate or escalate disputes” in the South China Sea.


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The world’s most (and least) obese countries

The world’s most (and least) obese countries | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"A massive chart ranks the world's most overweight countries"

-Source: Martinez R. Prevalence of Overweight and Obesity visualization.


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 22, 12:51 PM

"Tonga, Samoa and Kiribati, small island nations in the Pacific, top the list, with roughly four out of five of their citizens being overweight or obese. They are followed by a slew of Middle Eastern countries – Qatar, Kuwait, Libya, Egypt, and Saudi Arabia. Mexico, Turkey, Chile and Iceland also rank above the U.S. The U.S. comes in 27th with 66.3 percent of its population being obese or overweight.

The least overweight countries by this measure are Ethiopia and North Korea, with 6.1 percent and 4.4 percent of their population being overweight or obese, respectively."

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Who Owns Antarctica?


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Donna Farren's curator insight, April 23, 12:12 PM

This is fascinating!

Emma Boyle's curator insight, April 24, 9:04 AM

Shout out to Douglas.

Blake Joseph's curator insight, April 24, 3:48 PM

With Antarctica being the coldest, driest, and most isolated continent on earth, it is surprising that 51 different countries own pieces of land on it. As of now, the lands there can only be used strictly for scientific research, but I presume that treaty will not be in effect forever. Hidden resources yet to be discovered and future technology and is bound to give us some reason to permanently settle in this barren land someday. Discovering oil or minerals would be a good bet, as it was a leading factor in causing Dubai to form in the Arabian Desert, or the city of Perth in Western Australia. A healthy fishing industry could even help support future economies there. While weather has always been an important factor in human colonization, it does not make a place totally inhospitable. If economies can form in places like Barrow, Alaska and Longyearbyen, Norway, I don't see future  settlements in Antarctica as an impossibility.

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China's Xi Jinping agrees $46bn superhighway to Pakistan

China's Xi Jinping agrees $46bn superhighway to Pakistan | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
China's President Xi Jinping has signed a deal with Pakistan promising $46bn (£30.7bn) of investment.

 

China plans to inject some $46bn - almost three times the entire foreign direct investment Pakistan has received since 2008. Many say Mr Sharif's penchant for "thinking big" and China's increasing need to control maritime trade routes may well combine to pull off an economic miracle in Pakistan.

But there are questions over Pakistan's ability to absorb this investment given its chronic problems with militancy, separatism, political volatility and official corruption.

China is worried about violence from ethnic Uighurs in its mostly Muslim north-western Xinjiang region and fears hard-line separatists could team up with Uighur militants fighting alongside members of Pakistan's Taliban.


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1989 Raw Video: Man vs. Chinese tank Tiananmen square - YouTube

Share your videos with friends, family, and the world

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Infographic - The toll of a tragedy

Infographic - The toll of a tragedy | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
THE first reported case in the Ebola outbreak ravaging west Africa dates back to December 2013, in Guéckédou, a forested area of Guinea near the border with Liberia and Sierra Leone. Travellers took it across the border: by late March, Liberia had reported eight suspected cases and Sierra Leone six. By the end of June 759 people had been infected and 467 people had died from the disease, making this the worst ever Ebola outbreak. The numbers keep climbing. As of April 5th 2015, 25,550 cases and 10,587 deaths had been reported worldwide, the vast majority of them in these same three countries.

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Joe Biden: A Plan for Central America

Joe Biden: A Plan for Central America | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
If we don’t act, the region’s problems will arrive at our door.

Via David Lizotte, Seth Dixon
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David Lizotte's curator insight, February 3, 5:14 PM

This was an excellent article written by Biden. It was informative, simple to read, and well structured.

1 Billion Dollars is a lot of money to spend on foreign aid. However, I believe I see the bigger picture at work here. The United States would essentially be investing 1 Billion dollars into Central America, specifically Honduras, Guatemala, and El Salvador. The focus would be to strengthen the police force, control the violence, and create a more stable, democratic functioning government. Once the state is pronounced secure it will be ready for economic negotiations both on a national and international scale. Thus making money for itself and of course its investors. I believe once the United States improves the standard of living for these countries there will be investments made on North America's behalf. Money seems to always dictate relationships and the reasoning as to why they exist. It will take quite some time to reform these countries. None the less I'm sure the U.S. will see an economic profit in the long run, if of course Congress grants the money. These countries may have a lot of resources that can be of some use to more advanced nations. 

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Turkey's Erdogan condemns Pope over Armenia 'genocide'

Turkey's Erdogan condemns Pope over Armenia 'genocide' | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Turkish President Erdogan sharply criticises Pope Francis for using the term "genocide" for the killings of Armenians under Ottoman rule in WW1.

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Johnny Cash Has Been Everywhere (Man)!

Johnny Cash Has Been Everywhere (Man)! | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 28, 6:45 PM

This is more for the teachers than the students since this is most certainly not a current pop culture reference.  Still, what's better than an interactive map displaying the locations where Johnny Cash has been while listening to him sing "I've Been Everywhere?"  (Tech support: Use Google Chrome or Safari to play and ignore the finger). 


Tags: music, transportation, mapping, tourism.

Norka McAlister's curator insight, April 15, 10:08 PM

It remarkable how a map can illustrate in how many cities Johnny Cash performed in with his band. As a famous musician in the U.S., he targeted different states and his audience was diversity. Music gave him the opportunity to help people of all different ethnicties and social backgrounds. With his first band created in Germany, he continued to take his music around the world and especially in the U.S. His country music was most popular in the 70s and 80s and even now it can still be heard on the radio.

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Why People of This Tribe Live over 100 Years and do not Know About Cancer? | RiseEarth

Why People of This Tribe Live over 100 Years and do not Know About Cancer? | RiseEarth | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

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What makes geography grads the most employable?

What makes geography grads the most employable? | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
We asked our experts why they thought geography and psychology graduates were found to be least likely to be unemployed

Via Seth Dixon, Anna Hoppe
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 29, 2014 11:23 AM

Some studies have shown that geography graduates are some of the least likely to be unemployed...what makes geography majors so employable?  The mix of skills without one career track makes geography majors able to land on their feet in a shifting economic landscape.  If you wondering about job possibilities for geography majors, here is a list designed to answer the question, "what can I do with a geography degree?"  More than you might think. 

steve smith's curator insight, March 31, 2014 4:04 AM

Why study geography ? This is why

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How Charlotte's Neighborhoods Got Their Names

How Charlotte's Neighborhoods Got Their Names | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Wonder how Myers Park or NoDa became Myers Park and NoDa? To track down these answers, we enlisted the help of local historian Thomas Hanchett.
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Amazing Maps on Twitter

Amazing Maps on Twitter | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Human Migration out of East Africa pic.twitter.com/mlQGWtY0BT

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19 Bridges From Around The World That Will Take Your Breath Away.

19 Bridges From Around The World That Will Take Your Breath Away. | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Strolling across these bridges would definitely be a walk to remember and never forget.

Via F. Thunus
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Linda Alexander's curator insight, April 22, 11:06 PM

Gorgeous & Breathtaking....you'll want to paint these pictures. 

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What's the Yemen conflict really about?

What's the Yemen conflict really about? | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Is the conflict due to geographical rivalry, sectarian divisions, disappointment after the 2011 revolution or is it part of a wider regional power play?

Via Seth Dixon, Dustin Fowler
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 22, 2:58 PM

Saudi Arabia has recently announced that they stop their 4 week long bombing campaign against a rebel group in Yemen.  Like many complex geopolitical conflict, it is hard for students to begin to understand what the fighting is really about, but this article is a solid introduction to the Yemen conflict


Tags: Yemen, political, conflict.

Luis Cesar Nunes's curator insight, April 24, 12:42 PM

Something we should know about another insane conflict in which the United States became involved to worsen an already difficult situation

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Why does Africa have so many languages?

Why does Africa have so many languages? | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Studies show the African continent contains the highest genetic diversity of any place in the world, but whether or not that correlates to the highest variation in language isn't as clear.

Via Bonnie Bracey Sutton
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40 maps that explain outer space

From the moon to the cosmos, this is the universe we live in.

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The Armenian Genocide-100 years

The Armenian Genocide-100 years | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

“For most of the world, the Armenian Genocide is the slaughter you know next to nothing about. But every year on April 24, Genocide Remembrance Day, we Armenians remember the injustice of a crime that is rarely acknowledged and often flatly denied. It was April 24, 1915, when the Armenian intellectuals, professionals, editors and religious leaders in Constantinople were rounded up by the Ottoman authorities — and almost all of them executed. During World War I, the Ottoman Empire killed three of every four of its Armenian citizens. The majority of Armenians alive today are descendants of the few survivors.”


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Jacob Conklin's curator insight, April 16, 4:44 PM

Genocide is the pinnacle of inhumanity and cruelty. There are actually several stages of genocide according to Lemkin's Law. These stages include polarization, dehumanization, and denial. Genocide turns people into vermin fit for extermination. Starting with classification, one group is labeled a scapegoat for some sort of issue. They are then labeled with a symbol like a yellow star or a pink triangle to distinguish them from the rest of the population. The next stage is where the genocide truly begins. Dehumanization. The segregated group no longer consists of people, but a pestilence. A plague. eventually we reach the stage called extermination. The systematic slaughter of the group. The dehumanization is what makes this process easier. They aren't killing people; they are killing rodents. To survive something like this is unfathomable to me. To lose a family member to an illness is nothing compared to the pain of losing your humanity as well as your life. The fact that these acts occurred in the 20th century speaks volumes about how little humanity has progressed and if we will move forward at all as a society. 

tom cockburn's curator insight, April 17, 8:05 AM
Humans make distinctions between each other and there's always an excuse to hate it seems
Maricarmen Husson's curator insight, April 17, 7:37 PM

A 100 AÑOS DEL GENOCIDIO ARMENIO

Cada año el 24 de abril, día de la conmemoración del Genocidio, nosotros los armenios recordamos la injusticia de un crimen que rara vez se reconoció y a menudo negó rotundamente.

Era el 24 de abril de 1915, cuando los intelectuales armenios, profesionales, editores y líderes religiosos de Constantinopla fueron detenidos por las autoridades otomanas - y casi todos ellos ejecutados. Durante la Primera Guerra Mundial, el Imperio Otomano mató a tres de cada cuatro de sus ciudadanos armenios. La mayoría de los armenios vivos hoy son descendientes de los pocos sobrevivientes ".

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One Place, Two Names

One Place, Two Names | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
The government of the People’s Republic of China calls the country’s westernmost region Xinjiang, but the people who have lived there for centuries refer to their home as Eastern Turkistan. Many times when two groups do not refer to a place by the same name, it points to a cultural or political conflict, as is the case here.

Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 15, 11:23 AM

Multiple names on the map can hint at bigger cultural and political fault lines.  Is it Londonderry or just Derry?  The Sea of Japan or the East Sea?  This article I wrote for the National Geographic Education Blog is on the always simmering tensions in the China's westernmost province.  


TagsCentral Asia, toponyms, culture, political, conflictgovernance, China, East Asia, religionIslam, landscape.

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, April 15, 1:09 PM

This is definitely not the first time a dynamic like this happens and it will not be the last.  Whenever a country tries to incorporate a territory inhabited by a people with a different culture than their own into their sphere friction occurs.  Just like in Africa after the Berlin Conference, the Europeans experienced most resistance due to splitting up ethnic groups or making them live within the same realm as an enemy or outside group.  The indigenous people of Xinjiang, China are not Han Chinese.  They speak and identify more with a Turkish identity.  It is not hard to see that there is a big conflict of interest in the Northwestern corridor of China.

Bob Beaven's curator insight, April 16, 2:06 PM

This blog is interesting as it shows that China is not afraid of suppressing ethnic minorities to advance its goals.  As a social studies education major, with a focus in history, this reminds me of the USSR of old in a way.  Both countries contain ethnic minorities that are marginalized and discriminated against.  China's treatment of the people in Xinjiang or Eastern Turkistan as the natives call it is horrible.  The Communist Government is creating a culture that will push back, increasingly aggressively to the it.  If China doesn't handle this situation wisely, a Chechnya type situation could arise in the region.  China should do its best to prevent this, as this could be detrimental as the country would have to fight insurgents in its borders and it could become a target of the world wide Jihad of radicals in the Middle East.  As interesting as this article is, I actually never heard of this region, unlike Tibet which I learned about in High School.  However, as I said before this region has the possibility to influence the globe and China's reaction also plays into this situation.

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Countries as Named in Their Own Languages

Countries as Named in Their Own Languages | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
A map of the world’s endonyms.

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Interactive maps show travellers Shakespeare's London, Hugo's France - CTV News

Interactive maps show travellers Shakespeare's London, Hugo's France - CTV News | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
A recently launched map allows users to discover Edinburgh via its literary history, while an ongoing mapping project getting buzz this week delves into Shakespeare-era London.
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Table Mountain, Cape Town - National Geographic Photo of the Day

Table Mountain, Cape Town - National Geographic Photo of the Day | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Fog envelops Table Mountain in Cape Town, South Africa, in this National Geographic Photo of the Day from our Your Shot community.

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Coast to Coast: Baseball Hall of Fame Geography Lessons

Coast to Coast:  Baseball Hall of Fame Geography Lessons | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

The history of baseball reflects the story of expansion in the United States. New cities have emerged and modern stadiums have been built as a growing population fueled the popularity of our National Pastime. The result is an extensive network of baseball teams at every level - from the major leagues to the little leagues - that represent the communities and environments in which they play. Everything from jersey colors, names, and symbols to the foods served at ballparks reflects the local landscape and culture of baseball teams. A simple game that began with a bat and ball is now a comprehensive case study of how people and geography are interrelated.

 
All of the lessons and activities have been prepared to accompany "Geography: Baseball Coast to Coast." You will find that the curriculum is organized into three levels: Level 1 for elementary school students, Level 2 for middle school students, and Level 3 for high school students.


Via Seth Dixon, Anna Hoppe
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 4, 2014 10:07 PM

Thanks to the NCGE and the Baseball Hall of Fame for working together to bring us these great resources...play ball!!  On a local note, what baseball team is the most popular in your area?  Is there a geography to fan support? 

Marianne Hart's curator insight, April 23, 2014 11:28 AM

 Local teams, stadium name, mascot, Great addition to #MysterySkype

Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 28, 2014 11:50 PM

It neat to think as the population grew a new city needed a new field and team and they use the landscape and culture around them to help decide factors of a team including the name and mascot and even the food. An example would be although you would find hot dogs in every stadium its probably a specialty in Chicago while in New York its pizza and down south in Texas its nachos. 

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Official Maya Angelou Stamp Features Misattributed Quotation From Different Poet

Official Maya Angelou Stamp Features Misattributed Quotation From Different Poet | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Above is the U.S. Postal Service’s new Maya Angelou stamp, officially issued Tuesday and available now for purchase.

Via Mark G Kirshner
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Pakistan won't join Saudis in bombing Yemen's rebels

Pakistan won't join Saudis in bombing Yemen's rebels | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Unanimous vote in Islamabad parliament sees Pakistanis reject Saudi efforts to build broader coalition in favor of diplomacy
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