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What’s your local HDI (human development index)?

What’s your local HDI (human development index)? | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"A recently-released online tool enables Californians to see where they stand on a “human development index” – a composite measure of health, knowledge and standard of living developed by the American Human Development Project of the Social Sciences..." 

This is cool.  Instead of aggregating the data at the country level and comparing countries, we can see differences in local levels of human development.  Students see patterns of socio-economics and development vividly, and in an intensely local way tailored to their regional frame of reference.   


Via Seth Dixon
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Tracey Sarvis's curator insight, November 9, 2014 8:20 AM

Development and HDI

 

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AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO
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GeoGuessr - Let's explore the world!

GeoGuessr - Let's explore the world! | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
GeoGuessr is a geography game which takes you on a journey around the world and challenges your ability to recognize your surroundings.

Via Seth Dixon
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Edelin Espino's curator insight, September 10, 2014 2:31 PM

This is a really cool game! You should play it.

Allison Henley's curator insight, September 10, 2014 2:35 PM

Very addicting even though I'm not that great at it!! haha

Matleena Laakso's curator insight, October 5, 2014 4:55 AM

Tämä on hauska, muutaman kerran on tullut "pelattua".

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Violinmaking: A historic art

Violinmaking: A historic art | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Musicians agree that the best violins are still the ones made three centuries ago in a small town in Italy.
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Long-lost "Don Quixote" author finally found?

Long-lost "Don Quixote" author finally found? | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
The Spanish have long known that author Miguel de Cervantes was buried somewhere near chapel in Madrid, but for 399 years his exact location has remained a mystery
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Endangered Wildlife Trust

Endangered Wildlife Trust | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"If you don't pick it up they will."


Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 19, 12:03 PM

I found this ad from the Endangered Wildlife Trust to be very powerful.  It is a good introduction to systems and systems thinking.  

 

Tags: pollutionsustainability, environment, resources, water, coastal.

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Simulation of the Oso Landslide

Simulation of the Oso Landslide | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"The large landslide that occurred in March near Oso, Washington was unusually mobile and destructive."


Via Seth Dixon, Jodi Esaili
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 13, 1:53 PM

There are several reasons for landslides--some are purely a result of physical geography and others are related to land use patterns.  The landslide in Washington state last year was a combination of the two (see on map) and it is a good teaching moment to discuss the environmental impacts of land use patterns and resource extraction projects.  As seen in this interactive, the river was cutting at the base of the hill, while loggers were clear-cutting at the top of the mountain.  Trees help prevent erosion as the roots hold the soil in place--a critical piece to the puzzle in a very rainy climate.  With $1 million worth of timber on the slope, logging companies persisted despite objections from the Department of Natural Resources and some restrictions (but in hindsight, those restrictions clearly were not enough).  Watch a simulation of the landslide here.  

View the impact in ArcGIS online: Before and After Swipe, LiDAR I and II, and Imagery.


Questions to Consider: Other than economic worth, what other ways are there to value and evaluate the environment?  How could this landscape have been protected and managed better or was this landslide inevitable?   


Tagspolitical ecology, resources, environment, environment modify, industry, physical, geomorphology, erosion, landforms.

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, January 27, 4:50 PM

This seems like a useful tool to a degree.  But if we could actually simulate every destructive event then we would be miracle workers.  This was a sad event.  We have left such an imprint on the earth that it's starting to fight back.  We need to be more aware and careful with the one planet we have.  Climate changes are in the news more and more.  We can't ignore climate changes anymore.  

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If Britain were a U.S. state, it would be the second-poorest, behind Alabama and before Mississippi

If Britain were a U.S. state, it would be the second-poorest, behind Alabama and before Mississippi | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Britain's GDP divided by population ranks worse than all but one U.S. state.
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‘Potentially historic’ snow storm takes aim at Northeast this week

‘Potentially historic’ snow storm takes aim at Northeast this week | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
New York City could see 20 inches of snow when all is said and done. Snow totals in Boston could rival the snowiest storm the city has ever seen: 27.6 inches on Feb. 17-18, 2003.

 

The Weather Service in New York City has dubbed it a “potentially historic nor’easter.” Forecasters in Boston are calling it a “text book case” for a New England blizzard. And residents from Philadelphia to New York are being advised to change their travel plans for the blockbuster winter storm that will impact the Northeast on Monday and Tuesday.


Via Seth Dixon
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The Global Cities That Power the World Economy Now

The Global Cities That Power the World Economy Now | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
The latest numbers from the Brookings Institution are a reminder that inequality has a geographic dimension.

Via Allison Anthony, Luke Gray
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Google Maps and Street View - Hidden Features Most People Don't Know - The Fuse Joplin

Google Maps and Street View - Hidden Features Most People Don't Know - The Fuse Joplin | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Google Maps is a top directional app developed and maintained by the USA-based technological and advertising giant, Google.
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Human Development Index (HDI)

Human Development Index (HDI) | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"This map shows Human Development Index (HDI) for 169 countries in the World. The HDI is a comparative measure of life expectancy, literacy, education, and standard of living for countries worldwide. The HDI sets a minimum and a maximum for each dimension, called goalposts, and then shows where each country stands in relation to these goalposts, expressed as a value between 0 and 1, where greater is better. The Human Development Index (HDI) measures the average achievements in a country in three basic dimensions of human development: health, knowledge and standard of living."

 

Tags: development, statistics, worldwide.


Via Seth Dixon
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Brian Wilk's curator insight, January 22, 6:36 PM

This is really cool.....

 

Bharat Employment's curator insight, January 22, 11:56 PM

www.bharatemployment.com

Jason Schneider's curator insight, January 27, 3:11 PM

The reason why most of Africa and southern Asia has a low Human Development Index is because Africa and southern Asia has a high homelessness rate in comparison to other places and also, their economy is not as strong as Russia's, United States' or Europe's. It is cliché that Africa is mostly known for it's natural environments. Also, the Urban population in Africa is not as much as the Urban population in North America, South America, Europe, Russia and Australia.

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Complex International Borders

More complex international borders in this follow up to part 1. 
In this video I look at even more enclaves and exclaves."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 9, 8:09 AM

This video (like part 1) shows some great examples of how the political organization of space and administration of borders can get complicated.  Here are the examples (and time in the video when they are covered in the video) on these complex borders:


Tags: borders, political, territoriality, sovereignty, video.

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The #1 reason people die early, in each country

The #1 reason people die early, in each country | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

You're probably aware that heart disease and cancer are far and away the leading causes of death in America. But globally the picture is more complicated: The above map shows the leading cause of lost years of life by country (click to see a larger version). The data comes from the Global Burden of Disease study, whose 2013 installment was released just a few weeks ago. It's worth stressing that "cause of lost years of life" and "cause of death" aren't identical. For example, deaths from preterm births may cause more lost years of life in a country than deaths from heart disease even if heart disease is the leading cause of death. Deaths from preterm births amount to many decades of lost life, whereas heart disease tends to develop much later on.

 

But that makes the fact that heart disease is the leading cause of lost life in so many countries all the more striking, and indicative of those countries' successes in reducing childhood mortality. By contrast, in many lower-income countries, the leading cause is something like malaria, diarrhea, preterm birth, HIV/AIDS, or violence, which all typically afflict people earlier in life than heart disease or stroke. We've made considerable progress in fighting childhood mortality across the globe in recent decades, but there's still much work left to be done.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald, LEONARDO WILD
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Tossing Out Food In The Trash? In Seattle, You'll Be Fined For That

Tossing Out Food In The Trash? In Seattle, You'll Be Fined For That | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Seattle is the first city in the nation to fine people for not properly sorting their garbage. The law took effect on Jan. 1 as a bid to keep food out of landfills and encourage composting instead.
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Li Na's victory - CBS News

Li Na's victory - CBS News | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Lesley Stahl profiles the great Chinese tennis champion who stood up to her country's stringent sports system
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The Coolest Subway Stations In The World

The Coolest Subway Stations In The World | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
New Yorkers spend most of their time on the subway either stressing over train delays or wondering why the dude manspreading next to them is wearing a velour jumpsuit and eating a full plate of spaghetti. Straphangers abroad have similar woes, but wi...

Via Suvi Salo
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How American Agriculture Works

How American Agriculture Works | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
There really are two different Americas: the heartland, and the coasts....

Via Seth Dixon, Jane Ellingson
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Bharat Employment's curator insight, January 26, 11:32 PM
www.bharatemployment.com
Rachel Phillips's curator insight, January 27, 12:07 PM

I've always realized that the food we feed animals had to come from somewhere, but I never thought about just how much there actually had to be.  We, in America, import so much of our produce, and it now makes a lot more sense as to why.  We use what seems to be a majority of our produce supply to feed animals that people will later on eat.  In reality, it seems like a waste.  We use so much food to feed what will later on become food.  As a vegetarian, it seems like a poor cycle, and a waste of so much food that could help a lot of people.  I would never try to force anyone to stop eating meat, but looking at this map, it seems that all that produce could go to much better things than feeding animals that are up for slaughter.

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, January 27, 4:46 PM

My uncles in Iowa grow corn for ethanol.  They have a small crop where they grow corn they consume.  It is literally the best corn I've ever had.  I'm actually surprised Rhode Island produces almost $4mil in sweet corn.  I'm amazed that Mass produces $100 mil in cranberries.  I've seen a few cranberry bogs close down.  We produce so much why can't we actually feed everyone?  

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Istanbul - They Might Be Giants - lyrics - YouTube

Title: Istanbul Artist: They Might Be Giants Album: Flood Year: 1990 Owned by: WMG This is not of my creation.

Via Clairelouise
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25 Maps That Describe America

25 Maps That Describe America | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Despite being just one country, anyone who lives in the United States knows that no two states are alike. Here are 25 maps that show some of these regional differences.
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I never knew how differently France and America value religion

I never knew how differently France and America value religion | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
In the United States, we speak easily of different ethnic and religious communities. But the reality is far different in France, where the Charlie Hebdo attacks have brought religion and its place in French society back to the top of the agenda.

Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 21, 9:33 PM

If the US embraces freedom *of* religion, France embraces freedom *from* religion.

Stephen Zimmett's curator insight, January 25, 4:46 PM

I wonder how much America values religion. FRance on the other hand has a different value when speaking of religion.

 

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Simulation of the Oso Landslide

Simulation of the Oso Landslide | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"The large landslide that occurred in March near Oso, Washington was unusually mobile and destructive."


Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 13, 1:53 PM

There are several reasons for landslides--some are purely a result of physical geography and others are related to land use patterns.  The landslide in Washington state last year was a combination of the two (see on map) and it is a good teaching moment to discuss the environmental impacts of land use patterns and resource extraction projects.  As seen in this interactive, the river was cutting at the base of the hill, while loggers were clear-cutting at the top of the mountain.  Trees help prevent erosion as the roots hold the soil in place--a critical piece to the puzzle in a very rainy climate.  With $1 million worth of timber on the slope, logging companies persisted despite objections from the Department of Natural Resources and some restrictions (but in hindsight, those restrictions clearly were not enough).  Watch a simulation of the landslide here.  

View the impact in ArcGIS online: Before and After Swipe, LiDAR I and II, and Imagery.


Questions to Consider: Other than economic worth, what other ways are there to value and evaluate the environment?  How could this landscape have been protected and managed better or was this landslide inevitable?   


Tagspolitical ecology, resources, environment, environment modify, industry, physical, geomorphology, erosion, landforms.

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, January 27, 4:50 PM

This seems like a useful tool to a degree.  But if we could actually simulate every destructive event then we would be miracle workers.  This was a sad event.  We have left such an imprint on the earth that it's starting to fight back.  We need to be more aware and careful with the one planet we have.  Climate changes are in the news more and more.  We can't ignore climate changes anymore.  

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See What Your City Will Be Like in 15 Years

See What Your City Will Be Like in 15 Years | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
An interactive tool forecasts U.S. metro demographics circa 2030.

Via Nancy Watson
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Name That Grid!

Name That Grid! | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 16, 12:06 AM

I'm a sucker for online quizzes like this one that shows only the grid outlines of particular cities.  This isn't just about knowing a city, but also identifying regional and urban patterns.  What are some other fun trivia quizzes?  GeoGuessr is one of the more addictive quizzes  where 5 locations in GoogleMaps "StreetView" are shown and you have to guess where.  Smarty Pins is a fun game on Google Maps that tests players' geography and trivia skills.  In this Starbucks game you have to recognized the shape of the city, major street patterns and the economic patterns just to name a few (this is one way to make the urban model more relevant).  If you want quizzes with more direct applicability in the classroom, click here for online regional quizzes.         


Tags: urbanmodelsfun, trivia.

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Mali declared free of Ebola, health minister says

Mali declared free of Ebola, health minister says | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
After the disease came back after the nation had nearly eradicated it, no new cases have been recorded in over a month and a half
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