AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO
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For First Time In 130 Years, More Young Adults Live With Parents Than With Partners

For First Time In 130 Years, More Young Adults Live With Parents Than With Partners | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"For the first time in more than 130 years, Americans ages 18-34 are more likely to live with their parents than in any other living situation, according to a new analysis by the Pew Research Center.  Less educated young adults are also more likely to live with their parents than are their college-educated counterparts — no surprise, Pew notes, given the financial prospects in today's economy.  Black and Hispanic young people, compared with white people, are in the same situation.  But the overall trend is the same for every demographic group — living with parents is increasingly common.  Still, young Americans are still less likely to live with their parents than their European counterparts, Pew says.


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 25, 8:37 AM

I find that the best statistics have great explanatory power, make sense when placed in the right context, and STILL manage to leave you amazed.  These stats fit that bill for me and as the school year is ending, it's a milestone that doesn't mean what it did for generations past.  32.1% of young adults in the U.S live with parents, and 48.1% of young adults in the European Union Union live with parents.   

 

Questions to Ponder: What are some contributing factors to this trend in the United States and Europe?  What does this say about housing costs, economic, and cultural conditions? 

 

Tags: socioeconomic, housingstatisticspopulation, cultural norms, culture.

Bonnie Bracey Sutton's curator insight, May 26, 8:06 AM
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220 years of US population changes in one map

Every 10 years, the Census Bureau calculates the exact center of the US population. Here's what that statistic shows about our history.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 15, 1:46 PM

Every 10 years the centroid (the center of U.S. population) is calculated using the latest census data.  As the video above shows, the centroid has continued moved west throughout history, but in the last 60 years has moved to the south and west.  The recent shift to the south coincides with the mass availability of air conditioning (among other factors) which opened up the Sun Belt.  In this article in Orion Magazine, Jeremy Miller discusses the historical shifts in the spatial patterns of the U.S. population and the history of the centroid.  you can listen to the podcast version of the article or a shorter podcast by NPR

 

Questions to Ponder:  Would the centroids of other countries be as mobile or predictable?  Why or why not?  What does the centroid tell us?

 

Tags: statistics, census, mappingmigration, populationhistoricalUSA.

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The Atlas of Economic Complexity: the Case of Costa Rica

The Atlas of Economic Complexity: the Case of Costa Rica | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"Understanding global trade and economic data can feel overwhelming, but fortunately there are online tools that help us to visualize complex economic data. The data in these charts was incredibly easy to gather, thanks to the Atlas of Economic Complexity."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 14, 2015 3:12 PM

Before these tools existed, my first observations of economic geography and industrial development came when I left the US and was living in Central America.  I wrote this article to use the example of the shifts in the Costa Rican economy to demonstrate how to use the Atlas of Economic Complexity (which uses complicated data, but super easy to use).  


Tagsindustry, development, statistics, economic, Costa Rica.

Colleen Blankenship's curator insight, March 30, 12:10 PM

Before these tools existed, my first observations of economic geography and industrial development came when I left the US and was living in Central America.  I wrote this article to use the example of the shifts in the Costa Rican economy to demonstrate how to use the Atlas of Economic Complexity (which uses complicated data, but super easy to use).  


Tags: industry, development, statistics, economic, Costa Rica.

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Restless America: state-to-state migration

Restless America: state-to-state migration | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"Approximately 7.1 million Americans moved to another state in 2012. That’s over 2.2% of the U.S. population. The United States has a long history of people picking up and moving their families to other parts of the country, in search of better livelihoods. That same spirit of mobility, a willingness to uproot oneself, seems alive and well today based on the visualization of migration patterns above.

The visualization is a circle cut up into arcs, the light-colored pieces along the edge of the circle, each one representing a state. The arcs are connected to each other by links, and each link represents the flow of people between two states."


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Brealyn Holley's curator insight, November 3, 2015 9:18 PM

Many people migrate each and every day, but sometimes when they move to places like the USA, that part of the world can become overpopulated at times. Not having enough resources many begin to slowly die off which is either a good or bad thing while being in this position. However, when people do migrate they are leaving behind their homes and many are losing jobs. ~BH

Rylee English's curator insight, November 4, 2015 9:40 AM

in 2012, 2.2% of the U.S population migrated to different states. I think its  a good thing that people migrate to different states so they can expirience, first hand, how much states other than their home state contribute to our country. RE

Cade Johns's curator insight, November 5, 2015 7:51 PM

Much of the population in America migrates internally, approxamitely 7.1 million Americans in 2012.The only explanation is to go for a better life in another state.

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HDI over time in Central America

HDI over time in Central America | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"Explore public data through Google's visualization tools." 


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Gareth Jukes's curator insight, May 27, 2015 1:05 PM

Human Development Index-

This article explains how more and more countries in Central America are becoming more developed and have higher HDI. This helps create better views on Central America, thus giving it better chances via trade with other countries.

 

This article demonstrates the idea of HDI by showing the actual HDI's in Central America, and how most countries are increasing overall.

Chris Costa's curator insight, September 23, 2015 2:29 PM

With all the talk in media circles of how much off the world is now than it was 30 years ago, it's reassuring to see progress in a region that is characterized as violent and unstable. Although violence continues to plague this region more in relation to the West, progress is being made. From this, we can infer that the political landscape of these nations has improved, which would allow for greater economic growth, which in turn leads to a higher standard of living. The notion that this region is becoming more and more backwards is untrue and finds its foundation in the racist beliefs held by many white Americans, who dominate the media. There is a lot of work that remains to be done- Honduras continues to have one of the highest murder rates in the world- but progress is being made, and that will only help to strengthen the world economy. 

Luis R Soto's curator insight, March 19, 8:37 PM

One exercise that I do in many of my classes is based on this data and and outline map.  I have the students map out the Human Development Index data for Central America (full global dataset here) on an outline map of the region.   


Questions to Ponder: How might we be able to infer about migration within the region?  Foreign investment?  Political stability? 


Tags: Middle America, development, statistics, economic, mapping.

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International Migration

Almost everywhere on the world, international migration is a hot topic. Most of the time the debate about migration is fierce and charged with prejudices and...

Via Natalie K Jensen, Nancy Watson, Seth Dixon, Clairelouise
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Sierra_Mcswagger's curator insight, September 10, 2014 10:02 AM

This video is primarily talking on the widely known topic of migration. 3 percent of the worlds population is living away from there place of birth. The push of migration from places include poverty, war, and environmental disasters. The migration pull in some places are because of  economic opportunity, and political freedom. Migration is increasing, and is thought of as a bad thing.(s.s.)

Aurora Rider's curator insight, October 7, 2014 8:59 PM

This video is great for going over the many different aspects that go along with migration. It talks about what migration is and the reasons why people migrate known as push and pull factors. It talks about the different types of migration such as asylum seakers and illegal immigration. It mentions the disadvantages and advantages of migration.

Katelyn Sesny's curator insight, October 31, 2014 12:27 PM

A great YouTube video- discussing the controversy of international migration among other things that fall into place of the disapproval of international migration. -UNIT 2 

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The First Day of School Around the World

The First Day of School Around the World | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Take a look at the first day of school celebrations around the world!

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 28, 2014 10:29 AM

Access to education is one of the great indicators of development and political stability--educators wish nothing but the best education possible for the next generation, but the experience is quite variable across the globe.  As many places have recently started school again, this article is a reminder that this practice is experienced differently around the world. 


TagseducationK12, developmentperspective, worldwide.

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Global Multidimensional Poverty Index

Global Multidimensional Poverty Index | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"The global Multidimensional Poverty Index (MPI) is an international measure of acute poverty covering over 100 developing countries. It complements traditional income-based poverty measures by capturing the severe deprivations that each person faces at the same time with respect to education, health and living standards."


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Gina Panighetti's curator insight, August 4, 2014 4:54 PM

"Access"--North America Unit

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 7:01 PM

APHG-U2 & U6

AHS Model UN's curator insight, November 19, 2015 2:13 PM

The MPI was developed out of a desire to fill some of the gaps in the HDI's applicability and utility.  Allow me to quote the editor of one the NCGE's journals, the Geography Teacher, on the usefulness of the MPI website for classroom use: "With the infographics, maps, graphs, country briefings, and case studies, you have a ready-made lesson activities to demonstrate patterns of fertility, mortality, and health for a population unit, and access to health care, education, utilities, and sanitation for an Industrialization and Economic Development Unit. Connections can also be made to malnutrition and water, as well as to key concepts such as pattern and scale, to key geographical skills such as how to use and think about maps and geospatial data, and to the use of online maps and online data."  Also, this article from the World Bank also give a run-down on the key findings of the MPI in 2014. 

 

Tags: statisticspopulation, development, unit 2 population, unit 6 industry.

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Gender Gap Index

Gender Gap Index | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

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xavia's comment, April 10, 2014 12:38 AM
gender gap chloropleth
Chris Plummer's curator insight, January 29, 2015 8:30 AM

Summary- This map shows the equality of genders through their economic participation,  health, and access to education. In many poorer places you can see there is a much greater gender gap than in places like scandinavia where there isn't much of a gap at all. I

 

Insight- In Unit 3 one of the main subjects was gender. This chloropleth map shows the relationship between states and their equality among genders. It is easy to tell that in most undeveloped countries there is a much larger gender gap than more developed ones.

Gareth Jukes's curator insight, May 27, 2015 10:37 AM

Gender Inequality Index-

This article explains the places and locations of gender inequality, and how most of this is densely kept in Africa, where most men are more powerful than women. It also shows how in more developed countries, their is gender equality, and with it better economy.

This article shows gender inequality index by the map and information displaying how gender inequality is located more in developing countries. And gender equality is placed in developed countries.

 

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Understanding Global Statistics

Understanding Global Statistics | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"Infographics to explain global statistics."


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Leoncio Lopez-Ocon's curator insight, August 27, 2013 3:49 PM

Un conjunto de sencillas infografias para visualizar estadisticas de la humanidad en el tiempo presente

trampolinecalf's comment, September 27, 2013 2:46 AM
good one
Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 2014 12:11 PM

If the World was 100 People shows the statistics of the world as in smaller proportions allowing them to be easily visualized.

Some of the graphics divide the people into regions and nationalities mainly as Formal by continents .

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Gapminder

Gapminder | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

" Unveiling the beauty of statistics for a fact based world view."


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Bronwyn Desjardins's curator insight, June 23, 2013 6:51 AM

This is a great website for stats on all sorts of global information.

ratzelster's curator insight, June 25, 2013 11:38 AM

Looking for an effective visualization tool?  Gapminder might just help you get your point across with a picture.

JMSS_Geography Resources's curator insight, June 26, 2013 1:20 AM

A “fact tank” that promotes a fact based world view. Gapminder promotes sustainable global development and achievement of the United Nations Millennium Development Goals.

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Global flight paths

Global flight paths | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Transportation planner plots pattern of airline travel across the globe.

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jwilliams's comment, May 29, 2013 7:42 AM
Here is a video created of how to use Google Earth and airtraffic visual in a geography class. http://youtu.be/BXva8a1krMo
L.Long's curator insight, February 16, 2014 4:25 AM

Global networks

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Climographs

Climographs | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 11, 2013 1:54 PM

Climographs chart the monthly temperature and rainfall data and are a useful tool is studying climatology.  Here are links to dozens of selected United States and International cities that come from the National Drought Mitigation Center.  The image above is a climograph of Providence, RI.


Tags: physical, weather and climate, Rhode Island, statistics, visualization.

Anhony DeSimone's curator insight, December 19, 2013 9:15 AM

Climographs are used to show the temperature and precipitation within an area monthly. This collection of data allows us to see the climate changes that occur monthly with in an area to better understand its weather patterns.

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Global Peace Index

"The 2015 Global Peace Index reveals a divided world, with the most peaceful countries enjoying increasing levels of peace and prosperity, while the least peaceful countries spiral into violence and conflict. Explore the state of world peace on the interactive Global Peace Index map. www.visionofhumanity.org "



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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 15, 8:53 AM

The Middle East and North Africa is now the world’s least peaceful region for the first time since the Index began, due to an increase in civil unrest and terrorist activity while Europe, the world’s most peaceful region, has reached historically high levels of peace.  This might not seem shocking, but there is a great richness to this dataset that can provide detailed regional information as well as answer some big questions about global security.  Explore the data on your own with this interactive map of Global Peace or also of the states within the United States

 

Tags: political, terrorism, conflict, development, statistics, visualization, mapping, governance.

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Why Some Countries Are Poor and Others Rich

"The reason why some countries are rich and others poor depends on the quality of their institutions, the culture they have, the natural resources they find and what latitude they're on."

 

Tags: development, statistics, economic, globalization, poverty.


Via Seth Dixon, Michael Miller, AP US History
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Kaitlyn Evans's comment, July 30, 2015 5:24 AM
I'm not sure if I believe everything this video stated, however I think it is a good topic to analyze. I think it would be interesting to see how the rich countries became rich. They can't just have started on top. I also believe the rich countries abuse the poor countries because we can get goods/minerals/just about anything for a small price and then sell it in the rich country for much more.
Rob Duke's comment, July 30, 2015 3:34 PM
...certainly privilege from times past when there were no international watchdogs comes into play, but even when we control for colonialism, certain countries do much better than others. I'm inclined to think like Jared Diamond (The World Until Yesterday) and David Landes (The Wealth and Poverty of Nations. 1998) that institutions matter. If we protect property, provide vertical institutional support while also making room in the shadow of the law for ad hoc cooperation (see Elinor Ostrom's work), and protect intellectual property rights, we tend to have more wealth developed.
Adrian Bahan (MNPS)'s curator insight, March 14, 7:49 PM

I can't say I agree with all the arguments put forward in this video, it can still be a nice starting point to get students to critically analyze the ideas put forth and assess the merits of the claims being made.

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How Not to Be Ignorant About the World

How much do you know about the world? Hans Rosling, with his famous charts of global population, health and income data (and an extra-extra-long pointer), demonstrates that you have a high statistical chance of being quite wrong about what you think you know. Play along with his audience quiz — then, from Hans’ son Ola, learn 4 ways to quickly get less ignorant.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 17, 2015 5:01 PM

Our preconceived notions of places, as well as some of the dominant narratives about regions, can cloud our understanding about the world today.  This video is a good introduction to the Ignorance Project which shows how personal bias, outdated world views and news bias collectively make combating global ignorance difficult.   However, the end of the video shows some good rules of thumb to have a more fact-based world view.  


Tagsstatistics, placeregions, media, models, gapminderdevelopment, perspective.

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, September 18, 2015 11:32 PM

adicionar sua visão ...

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Why Some Countries Are Poor and Others Rich

"The reason why some countries are rich and others poor depends on the quality of their institutions, the culture they have, the natural resources they find and what latitude they're on."

 

Tags: development, statistics, economic, globalization, poverty.


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Kaitlyn Evans's comment, July 30, 2015 5:24 AM
I'm not sure if I believe everything this video stated, however I think it is a good topic to analyze. I think it would be interesting to see how the rich countries became rich. They can't just have started on top. I also believe the rich countries abuse the poor countries because we can get goods/minerals/just about anything for a small price and then sell it in the rich country for much more.
Rob Duke's comment, July 30, 2015 3:34 PM
...certainly privilege from times past when there were no international watchdogs comes into play, but even when we control for colonialism, certain countries do much better than others. I'm inclined to think like Jared Diamond (The World Until Yesterday) and David Landes (The Wealth and Poverty of Nations. 1998) that institutions matter. If we protect property, provide vertical institutional support while also making room in the shadow of the law for ad hoc cooperation (see Elinor Ostrom's work), and protect intellectual property rights, we tend to have more wealth developed.
Adrian Bahan (MNPS)'s curator insight, March 14, 7:49 PM

I can't say I agree with all the arguments put forward in this video, it can still be a nice starting point to get students to critically analyze the ideas put forth and assess the merits of the claims being made.

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Human Development Index (HDI)

Human Development Index (HDI) | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"This map shows Human Development Index (HDI) for 169 countries in the World. The HDI is a comparative measure of life expectancy, literacy, education, and standard of living for countries worldwide. The HDI sets a minimum and a maximum for each dimension, called goalposts, and then shows where each country stands in relation to these goalposts, expressed as a value between 0 and 1, where greater is better. The Human Development Index (HDI) measures the average achievements in a country in three basic dimensions of human development: health, knowledge and standard of living."

 

Tags: development, statistics, worldwide.


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Caroline Ivy's curator insight, May 18, 2015 10:41 AM

This article discusses the Human Development Index (HDI), what it is, and how it is calculated. 

 

This chart displays that the top three spots on the HDI are occupied by Norway, Australia, and the Netherlands respectively, with the USA coming in fourth. As HDI is calculated by comparing aspects like literacy, standard of living, education, and life expectancy, why are two European countries and Australia in the top 3? Something to be looked at is the in-migration of each country. Immigrants arrival in large numbers in some countries can lower HDI if they are refugees or come from a country with a lower HDI, for they may be illiterate, have a low education, and therefore a low life expectancy. With in migration to the US tightly controlled but in constant motion, their HDI could be pulled down to 4th. As Norway and Australia and the Netherlands are not the main destination for refugees, their HDI could be higher.   

Cody Price's curator insight, May 27, 2015 12:49 AM

The HDI is the human development index which ranks countries in many different aspects. The higher the country the more developed and modern it is. The least amount of death and the longest lives are here. It is more stable the higher the country.

 

This relates to the topic in unit 6 of HDI. this map shows the basic HDIS of the world and the patterns formed by the HDI layout of the world. 

Anna Sasaki's curator insight, May 27, 2015 2:04 AM

This map shows the Human Development Index around the world. The HDI depends on a set list of variables, ranking them from 1st to last. Nations considered to be "Western" are more developed than nations in regions such as Africa and Asia, although all nations are slowly but steadily developing, improving their Human Development Index ranking.

The HDI shows development in nations, although leaving out Inequality factors. This map also allows us to see spatially what regions tend to be more developed as well as developing.

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4000 Deaths And Counting: The Ebola Epidemic In 4 Charts

4000 Deaths And Counting: The Ebola Epidemic In 4 Charts | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
The number of deaths in West Africa continues to rise at an exponential rate. These charts help explain the latest trends.

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Martin Daumiller's curator insight, October 14, 2014 4:28 AM

The death toll for the Ebola virus disease in West Africa has now passed 4000 with a total number of cases exceeding 8000 and a fatality rate of est. 71% (accounting for the time lag between diagnosis and clinical disease outcomes). As of 14 September, the doubling time is 16 days in Guinea, 24 days in Liberia and 30 days in Sierra Leone. The infection in West Africa had a basic reproductive number of R_0~1.7-2 (with R_0 being the number of people who catch the disease from one sick person, on average, in an outbreak; defined as the triple product of the transmissibility (i.e., probability of infection given contact between a susceptible and infected individual), the average rate of contact between susceptible and infected individuals, and the duration of infectiousness) that appears to be quite low in contrast to other diseases such as measles (R_0=12-18) as Ebola isn't spread through the air, like the measles or flu and requires close contact with some bodily fluid, such as blood or vomit, containing the virus. However one may not be blinded by this low R_0 value, as the R_0 is integrated over the time that a person is infectious to others. For HIV, this could be years., but for Ebola, that time is only about a week. As the WHO Global Response Team conclude in their recent study: “These data indicate that without drastic improvements in control measures, the numbers of cases of and deaths from [Ebola virus disease] are expected to continue increasing from hundreds to thousands per week in the coming months.” Due to the incubation time for approx. ten days (in which it is at least not yet contagious), wide spread can occur unnoticed, especially since early Ebola symptoms are also symptoms of other viral infections.

analise moreno's curator insight, October 14, 2014 7:49 PM

The population in West Africa is decreasing rapidly, in Africa they don't have as well medical care so the people are dying. It is noteworthy because I am interested in the topic "Ebola" and we are learning about CBR and CDR. 

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Fragile States Index

Fragile States Index | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"Weak and failing states pose a challenge to the international community. In today’s world, with its highly globalized economy, information systems and interlaced security, pressures on one fragile state can have serious repercussions not only for that state and its people, but also for its neighbors and other states halfway across the globe.  The Fragile States Index (FSI), produced by The Fund for Peace, is a critical tool in highlighting not only the normal pressures that all states experience, but also in identifying when those pressures are pushing a state towards the brink of failure."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 27, 2014 3:31 PM

How can political stability and security be measured?  What constitutes effective governance?  The Fragile States Index (formerly known as the Failed States Index) is a statistical ranking designed to measure the effective political institutions across the globe.  There are  12 social, economic, and political/military categories that are a part of the overall rankings and various indicators are parts of the metrics that are a part of this index are:

SOCIAL

•Demographic Pressures 

•Refugees/IDPs

•Group Grievance

•Human Flight and Brain Drain

ECONOMIC

•Uneven Economic Development

•Poverty and Economic Decline

POLITICAL/MILITARY

•State Legitimacy

•Human Rights and Rule of Law

•Public Services

•Security Apparatus

•Factionalized Elites

•External Intervention


Tags: political, statisticsdevelopment, territoriality, sovereignty, conflict, political, devolution, war.

Melissa Marshall's curator insight, August 28, 2014 12:57 AM

How can political stability and security be measured? The Fragile States Index is a statistical ranking designed to measure the effective political institutions across the globe.

MsPerry's curator insight, September 1, 2014 9:49 AM

APHG-Unit 4

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A Map of Baseball Nation

A Map of Baseball Nation | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"Fans may not list which team they favor on the census, but millions of them do make their preferences public on Facebook. Using aggregated data provided by the company, we were able to create an unprecedented look at the geography of baseball fandom, going down not only to the county level, as Facebook did in a nationwide map it released a few weeks ago, but also to ZIP codes."


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Greg Russak's curator insight, April 29, 2014 12:53 PM

Maps and baseball - a good combination!

Wyatt Wolf's curator insight, October 30, 2014 7:46 PM

My favorite baseball team is the Philadelphia Phillies, here's everyone else's.

Global Speechwriter's comment, November 4, 2014 2:52 AM
Jays? C'mon.
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2013 World Population Data Sheet Interactive World Map

2013 World Population Data Sheet Interactive World Map | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

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Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 11, 2013 11:28 AM

By looking at this data sheet you can see that the worlds population will increase by the millions in 2050. These populations will increase in areas that are already very populated and in areas that are not so heavily populated yet. 

Lona Pradeep Parad's curator insight, May 28, 2014 7:00 PM

This is an interactive map where you can click the year you wish and see what the population is or will be. it allows a person to observe and understand population growth better.

Katelyn Sesny's curator insight, October 31, 2014 12:21 PM

A straightforward map that puts previous knowledge (of the rapidly growing population and the limited food supply) into prescriptive. -UNIT 2

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American Centroid Helps To Trace Path Of U.S. Migration

American Centroid Helps To Trace Path Of U.S. Migration | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"David Greene talks to writer Jeremy Miller about the American Centroid. That's the place where an imaginary, flat, weightless and rigid map of the U.S. would balance perfectly if all 300 million of us weighed the exact same."


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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, August 31, 2013 2:23 AM

The centre of population in the USA has moved further inland and southward compared to Australia. Comparing urbanisation in USA and Australia.

Blake Welborn's curator insight, November 11, 2013 10:33 PM

Informative, short podcast that details the changing migration of the US. This allows for the comparison of migration and time and the effects of migration over the years in the US. 

Emily Bian's curator insight, October 17, 2014 7:32 PM

The center of the U.S. population moves about every 10 years. 

In our APHUG textbook, it also talked about the center moving west. It also talks about the patterns and shifts of migration in the U.S going more west and south now, than before. I wonder if the trend will continue?  

It relates because we talked about this map in APHUG class, and it was in the textbook. The population trend is moving Southwest.

This is interesting for next year's APHUG students, because they get to see a population trend right in the US! It's a good article to think about why population trends are the way it is.

2) migration

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World Policy Analysis Center

World Policy Analysis Center | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

The World Policy Analysis Center aims to improve the quantity and quality of comparative data available to policymakers, citizens, civil society, and researchers around the world on policies affecting human health, development, well-being, and equity.


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 19, 2013 7:57 PM

Following seven years of data collection, the World Policy Analysis Center recently launched a series of over 100 easy-to-understand maps of current laws, policies, and constitutional rights in 193 countries. They are eager to share this information and the maps that we have created and believe it will help engage geography students. The maps address questions such as:

  • In which countries can you finish high school without paying tuition?
  • In which countries can you attend college without paying tuition?
  • In which countries are you legally protected from marriage at an average high school student’s age?
  • In which countries are you legally protected from working full-time at an average high school student’s age?
  • In which countries are men and women guaranteed equity in their country’s constitution?
  • In which countries are people of different ethnicities guaranteed equity in their country’s constitution?
  • In which countries does the constitution guarantee a right to medical services?

This data could provide exciting teaching tools to help students think about the implications of laws and policies around the world, particularly as they affect teenagers.

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Topographic Maps

Topographic Maps | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
USGS National Geologic Database- TopoView

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 18, 2013 10:38 AM

The National Geologic Map Database is a simple interactive tool to find USGS topographic maps that you can dowload.  Users can search for current or historic maps.  

 

Tagsgeospatial, GIS, mapping, cartography.

Paul Nicoara's curator insight, May 5, 2013 5:05 PM

The National Geologic Map Database is a simple interactive tool to find USGS topographic maps that you can dowload.  Users can search for current or historic maps.