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Why Indians love cricket

Why Indians love cricket | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
TO OUTSIDERS, the magnitude of Indians' love for cricket is as incomprehensible as its feverish intensity. On February 4th India awarded the Bharat Ratna, its highest civilian honour, to Sachin Tendulkar, a recently retired batsman. Millions in India, a country of 1.3 billion people and only one nationally-popular game, celebrated wildly. When India's national side plays a big game, an estimated 400m watch on television. Yet cricket's take-off in India is a highly improbable development. The game is demanding to play properly, requiring space, a good turf pitch and expensive equipment—which only a relative handful of Indian cricketers have access to. Most will never strap on pads or bowl with a leather ball. So why do they so love the game?

 

Tags: sport, popular culture, culture, development, India, South Asia, globalization, empire.


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Bob Beaven's curator insight, April 2, 3:25 PM

This article is interesting because it shows how a sport can unite an entire country.  Cricket, which is an English game very similar to the American game of Baseball, is highly popular in India.  The game that was brought to the country by the English colonizers and then played by rich Indians eventually became a populist sport.  As the article states, the explosion of TVs in the country greatly aided in spreading the sport across the country, in fact 400 million people are estimated to watch when the Indian National Team plays.  The most interesting fact to me is that a sport used by colonizers has become a way for the people who were colonized to express themselves.  In some ways, Cricket is very closely associated with India today.  There was even a Disney movie, "Million Dollar Arm", in which Indian Cricket players are transformed into American Baseball pitchers.  Today, it is clear that the sport of Cricket is more closely linked with India, than with England who created the sport.  Also show cased, is the power sports can have in society to unite a nation.

Louis Mazza's curator insight, April 6, 4:40 PM

The Indian culture has a peculiar love for a tough game, cricket. The game requires large space with the correct turf, expensive equipment, and a good amount of skill. India has not always been heavily involved in cricket, it is a relatively new sport. When the British colonial rulers of the 19th century started playing cricket on Indian grounds, some ambitious Indians wanted to play for themselves. This is the only sport to generate such a high prestige in India. Mass media is now rapidly expanding the growth of the game, the biggest being television. Some Indian families acquired a television in order to follow cricket. 

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, May 1, 4:29 PM

India played a smart game.  They were deemed civilized enough to rule themselves.  The game of cricket was a game the Indian elites played because they realized the political importance of it.  Smart, smart, smart.  From British colonialism, things have stuck like Parliament and cricket.  Smart Indians or smarter British?  

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Beautiful Physical Landscapes

"#TheRidge is the brand new film from Danny Macaskill... For the first time in one of his films Danny climbs aboard a mountain bike and returns to his native home of the Isle of Skye in Scotland to take on a death-defying ride along the notorious Cuillin Ridgeline."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 3, 2014 3:41 PM

I loved Danny Macaskill's earlier video in Scotland's cultural landscapes, and this extreme sports clip is infused with gorgeous physical landscapes.  


Tag: Scotland, sport, landscape.

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, October 6, 2014 5:37 AM

Beautiful Physical Landscapes

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, October 19, 2014 7:37 PM

Engage boys with Landforms and Landscapes - intro video!

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A Map of Baseball Nation

A Map of Baseball Nation | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"Fans may not list which team they favor on the census, but millions of them do make their preferences public on Facebook. Using aggregated data provided by the company, we were able to create an unprecedented look at the geography of baseball fandom, going down not only to the county level, as Facebook did in a nationwide map it released a few weeks ago, but also to ZIP codes."


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Greg Russak's curator insight, April 29, 2014 12:53 PM

Maps and baseball - a good combination!

Wyatt Wolf's curator insight, October 30, 2014 7:46 PM

My favorite baseball team is the Philadelphia Phillies, here's everyone else's.

Global Speechwriter's comment, November 4, 2014 2:52 AM
Jays? C'mon.
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Why Sochi?

Why Sochi? | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Why would Vladimir Putin want to host the Olympics in an underdeveloped place where terrorists lurk nearby? The answer is not as complicated as it may seem.

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Jessica Rieman's curator insight, February 18, 2014 1:46 PM

It comes at not shock that Russia has had it's share of bad rulers that exzibit totalitarianistic views. Russia has always been in a state of massacre or some time of bad war torn conflict happeening. Russia is also the type of place where you can drive in each way 45 minutes and be able to either swim in the black sea or ski on the snowy trails. I think this is one of the reasons why the winter olympics are hosted here.

Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, February 18, 2014 2:52 PM

There are many reasons as to why the Olympics this year are held in Sochi, Russia i. Although it is an underdeveloped, terrorist driven area, it holds much potential and Vladimir Putin has reasons to why it is the perfect place.

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, March 1, 2014 12:59 AM

This article explains why Putin wanted the Winter Olympic games to be in Sochi. The Olympics have historically been used as a way for a nation to showcase progress or power, and the case is no different here. By hosting the games in Sochi, Putin was drawing attention to his successful crushing of the Chechen rebels and Russia's reinvestment into the area. Through the games, Putin is trying to make an international statement about the security and progress in this war-torn area. Still, there are a number of Chechen rebel cells and Circassian protesters in the area with a grudge against Russia.

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Protests and the World Cup

Protests and the World Cup | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Fury, anarchy, martyrdom: Why the youth of Brazil are (forever) protesting, and how their anger may consume the World Cup.

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Steven Flis's curator insight, December 17, 2013 5:48 AM

(Sidebar I used this article while gathering information for my research paper). Even though this is happening in Brazil i would like to beleive that this is exaclty what the United States founding fathers would of wanted us to do if our goverment was blatanly mistreating us like the politicians in Brazil. The youth of brazil realized what a moumentus occasion this was and didnt waste their chance to show the world their problems which forced the hand of the politicians into a political reform. Great example of how can make a difference if you have enough followers.

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 4, 2014 2:08 PM

This is about so much more than the World Cup. It is protest against government corruption and politicians lining their pockets with money under the guise of public works.

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, September 29, 2014 3:01 PM

When construction was occurring for the World Cup, a friend of mine was teaching in an extremely poor area of Brazil.  Seeing his pictures compare to the ones on ESPN really opened my eyes to the immense poverty gap.  Yes, soccer is major for Brazil and is extremely profitable however we see here a moral issue.  Billions spent on something as trivial as a sport, when millions are living in extreme poverty. Regardless of how serious people are about sports at the end of the day it means nothing when the country is comfortable with using billions to fund a recreation rather than feed their own people.

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Pass Atlas: A Map of Where NFL Quarterbacks Throw the Ball

Pass Atlas: A Map of Where NFL Quarterbacks Throw the Ball | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"Football’s analytics are evolving quickly. Thanks to new forms of data and emerging kinds of analyses, teams, media, and fans are gaining new insights into on-field performances."


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Bonnie Bracey Sutton's comment, September 30, 2013 12:27 PM
Esri did a map of some stars successful and unsuccessful passes. I think it was Magic Johnson. Pretty interesting!
Bonnie Bracey Sutton's comment, September 30, 2013 12:27 PM
Esri did a map of some stars successful and unsuccessful passes. I think it was Magic Johnson. Pretty interesting!
megan b clement's comment, December 15, 2013 11:42 PM
This article explains how people come up with the statistics that they can for each player. Using spatial thinking anaylsts can figure out where a player is best on the field. Where players "sweet spots" are on the field or where a player is most effective when playing. It is crazy how people even thought of this.
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Out of nowhere: U football player comes from dusty California outpost

Out of nowhere: U football player comes from dusty California outpost | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

Cedric Thompson retraced some of the steps that led him from L.A. to a dusty California outpost to, finally, the Gophers football team.


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Courtney Burns's curator insight, September 19, 2013 5:20 PM

It is amazing how much the location of where you live can influence your life. Thompson traveled all over the place and each place had a huge impact on his life. His whole life could have been different if he had lived elsewhere. For example if he stayed in L.A who knows if he would have ended up getting involved in gangs or even been killed like some of his family members. Then again if he hadn't lived in Bombay would he ever have found that motivation to work hard. He didn't think so. His area even had an impact on him being recruited, because not many people thought to recruit a kid from Bombay. The area you live in really can have a huge role in who you become. Fortunately Thompson was able to use his experience to change his life and even his families future for the better. Such an amazing story and it is all due to where a person lived. 

Shelby Porter's curator insight, September 26, 2013 9:13 AM

This is such an inspiring story, and it's crazy to think that everything he has become is due to where he grew up. If this man had not gone to Bombay Beach his life would be very different. He probably would have gotten involved with gangs and never seen his full potential. Attending high school in such a remote area encouraged him to better his life so he could get out of there. Being bored all the time, he became a workout fiend and his father made him become a better student. Being from such a remote area also intrigued the Minnesota college scout. The choices Cedric made in his life as to where he would live, whether in Bombay Beach or the Minnesota college campus have drastically changed his life forever. 

megan b clement's comment, December 16, 2013 12:20 AM
Cedric wanted more for himself and his life. He commuted hours away from home in order to stay away from the gangs and violence that surrounded him back home. So he endured the long travel inorder to better his life. He also was an exceptional football player. He felt he had no choice and it pushed him even harder because he wanted an out from that life he had at home. He wanted better for him and his family.
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Is Your State's Highest-Paid Employee A Coach? (Probably)

Is Your State's Highest-Paid Employee A Coach? (Probably) | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
You may have heard that the highest-paid employee in each state is usually the football coach at the largest state school. This is actually a gross mischaracterization: Sometimes it is the basketball coach.

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Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 11, 2013 11:58 AM

By looking at this map you can see that almost 75% of the United States highest paying public workers are basketball or football coaches. In my opinion this seems a little crazy to think about. I figured it would be maybe the school deans or plastic surgeons like the blue color shows in some states. 

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Out in the Great Alone

Out in the Great Alone | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
The Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race pushes participants to the brink on an unforgiving trek to the end of the world. And, as one writer who tracked the race by air discovers, that is exactly the point.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 25, 2013 2:06 PM

The Iditarod is as much about conquering the physical environment and harsh climates as any sporting event in the world.  This article about this famous Alaskan race also has a unique geo-visualization component to it that is worth exploring--it has a map showing where the action takes place in the article and as the reader scrolls through the article, the map changes and it highlights the progression along the trail.   


Tags: physical, weather and climatesport, Arctic, visualization.

chris tobin's comment, April 26, 2013 6:18 PM
very good story describing the long and dangerous trek. Its pretty amazing. I appreciated the video commentary and pictures of scenery and animals of the areas.
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2013 NCAA Men’s Basketball Tournament

2013 NCAA Men’s Basketball Tournament | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 18, 2013 5:18 PM

The brackets are rarely as "regional" as the names Midwest, West, South and East would suggest; still a map of all the participating teams shows that there a geography to basketball participation.  See also this collection of maps visualizing basketball fandom.  Also, what about the high schools areas that produce college basketball players?  What patterns to you see? 

Emily Ross Cook's curator insight, March 21, 2013 8:28 AM

Oh man! I love March Madness!

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Perception and Place

Perception and Place | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

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50% yes, 50% no.  The raw statistics would tell you that the country is perfectly divided on this question of whether or not the University of Alabama has the greatest college football program of all time.  Not surprising to geographers, in evenly split polls, elections, or other data results, there are oftentimes strong regional factors that influence variation in the data (in this case, local allegiances, media bias and general sport fanaticism).  

 

Questions to Ponder:  Alabama's voting pattern is obvious, what explains for some of the other poll results from particular states?  Why is there a general East/West divide on this question?  What are the regional factors that influence the voting patterns?  Would the result be different on 6 months from now?

 

Tags: sport, statistics, mapping, regions.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 8, 2013 9:56 AM

50% yes, 50% no.  The raw statistics would tell you that the country is perfectly divided on this question of whether or not the University of Alabama has the greatest college football program of all time.  Not surprising to geographers, in evenly split polls, elections, or other data results, there are oftentimes strong regional factors that influence variation in the data (in this case, local allegiances, media bias and general sport fanaticism).  


Questions to Ponder:  Alabama's voting pattern is obvious, what explains for some of the other poll results from particular states?  Why is there a general East/West divide on this question?  What are the regional factors that influence the voting patterns?  Would the result be different on 6 months from now?


Tags: sport, statistics, mapping, regions.

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Dark Days: When the Colts Left Baltimore

A look back on the 27th Anniversary of the the NFL Colts dark flight from Baltimore in the middle of the night.

 

BM: When the Colts left they took the heart of Balitmore and left the fans in utter disbelief. Robert Irsay had no intention of staying whether he got his new staidum for the Colts or not, he wanted out and had been looking since 1976. The city of Baltimore was not going to budge on the construction of a new pubically funded stadium simply because it was too expensive and the citry didn't have the money. All that remained in Baltimore was an empty Memorial Stadium, which wasn't perfect but was in really decent shape and the Orioles. 

 

SD: Why are sports teams treated so differently from other businesses?  How are teams linked to place in such intimate ways?  What is the economic impact of a sports team on the city and how could relocation damage that city?  See this scoop.it topic for more on the cultural and economic impacts of sports teams on cities.


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Ms. Harrington's comment, August 8, 2012 9:09 AM
I never knew about this particular team, but I can see how a sports franchise abandoning a city has a devastating effect. It seems like there was a deliberate attempt to "sneak"out.
Roland Trudeau Jr.'s comment, August 8, 2012 9:16 AM
Quite a blow to the entire city of Baltimore, you can see from the older footage as well as the new how badly this effected this city. A huge impact on the people, seemingly crushing spirits across the city.
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Environmental Influences of Skating

"Dogtown and Z-Boys: A documentary about the pioneering 1970s Zephyr skating team."

 

Popular culture is shaped by taste-makers, counter-cultural movements, and the blending of cultural practices in new ways creating a distinct aesthetic. Often, the physical geography of a region plays a crucial role in shaping the cultural practices particular to their environment. All of that can be seen quite vividly in the colorful skating revolution of the 1970s that took shape in the Southern California. Kids who grew up idolizing surfers branched out their recreational habits into the modern form of skating that we see today at the X Games. Made legendary through a series of Skateboarder magazine articles (accessible online here: http://www.angelfire.com/ca2/dtown/articles.html ), these kids shaped the cultural ethos of skateboarding for over a generation. With the coastal influence of surfing, the socioeconomics of a seaside slum, it’s abandoned piers, the ubiquity of cement and asphalt in the urban landscape, the run-down neighborhood of “Dogtown” was home to cultural movement. The fierce droughts of the 1970 meant abandoned swimming pools; that drought led surfers to the technological infrastructure for modern skating ramps and half pipes as they skated in emptied swimming pools. As stated in those Skaterboarder articles, "two hundred years of American technology has unwittingly created a massive cement playground of unlimited potential. But it was the minds of 11 year olds that could see that potential." The documentary “Dogtown and Z-Boys” and the fictionalized “Lords of Dogtown,” both produced by skater turned filmmaker Stacy Peralta, chronicle the age (“Lords of Dogtown” is probably not appropriate for the classroom).  The Video has been removed from YouTube, but the first part is viewable here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qZ8xmI2yVQg&playnext=1&list=PL2279B6A628D53D8A&feature=results_main

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Geographic Influences of Skating

"Dogtown and Z-Boys: A documentary about the pioneering 1970s Zephyr skating team."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 9, 2014 1:53 PM

Popular culture is shaped by taste-makers, counter-cultural movements, and the blending of cultural practices in new ways creating a distinct aesthetic. Often, the physical geography of a region plays a crucial role in shaping the cultural practices particular to their environment. All of that can be seen quite vividly in the colorful skating revolution of the 1970s that took shape in the Southern California. Kids who grew up idolizing surfers branched out their recreational habits into the modern form of skating that we see today at the X Games. Made legendary through a series of Skateboarder magazine articles, these kids shaped the cultural ethos of skateboarding for over a generation. With the coastal influence of surfing, the socioeconomics of a seaside slum, it’s abandoned piers, the ubiquity of cement and asphalt in the urban landscape, the run-down neighborhood of “Dogtown” was home to cultural movement. The fierce droughts of the 1970 meant abandoned swimming pools; that drought led surfers to the technological infrastructure for modern skating ramps and half pipes as they skated in emptied swimming pools. As stated in those Skaterboarder articles, “two hundred years of American technology has unwittingly created a massive cement playground of unlimited potential. But it was the minds of 11 year olds that could see that potential.” The documentary “Dogtown and Z-Boys” (trailer) and the fictionalized “Lords of Dogtown,” (trailer) both produced by skater turned filmmaker Stacy Peralta, chronicle the age (“Lords of Dogtown” is not appropriate for the K-12 classroom viewing).


Tags: place, spacesport, California, landscapevideo, popular culture, music.

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NASA and the World Cup

NASA and the World Cup | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"NASA goes to the World Cup! Satellite imagery from each country playing."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 28, 2014 8:43 PM

Not that we need any extra incentive to view NASA's gorgeous satellite imagery, but now that the World Cup has entered the knockout rounds, it is the perfect opportunity to view selected images from the participating countries.  This gallery of a dozen World Cup StoryMaps are but a few of the thousands of Esri StoryMaps that can serve as motivation to get your K-12 U.S. school an organizational account for ArcGIS online (then your students can make cool maps like these). 


Tags: sport, Brazil, South America, Esri, fun, mapping, remote sensing, geospatial, images, perspective.

Lena Minassian's curator insight, February 13, 11:21 AM

This map was a virtual interactive map that shows satellite images from all of the countries playing in the World Cup. I loved this map not only because I am a soccer fan but it showed a different view of the participating countries. It was so interesting to see these countries from a satellite view because not many people are used to seeing these images. It was nice to be able to click on them and learn more about what each picture was showing. 

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Place and Opinions

Place and Opinions | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 30, 2014 9:20 PM

Some deeply held opinions that individuals hold are rooted in the cultural and regional influences (even if they feel that they are being purely objective).  Sports fans though, are rarely objective and are often swayed by those opinions that they hear the most, which often come for those closest to us.  While we are on the subject of basketball and geography, you've got to try Population Bracketology, which challenges your knowledge on the sizes of Metropolitan Statistic Areas and state population.     


Tags: fun, sport, place.

Ms. Harrington's curator insight, March 31, 2014 7:11 PM

Sports and regions

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Security Still A Major Concern In Sochi

ESPN Video: Jeremy Schaap details the threats to the 2014 Winter Olympic Games in Sochi, Russia.

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Jessica Rieman's curator insight, February 18, 2014 2:14 PM

Security is a major concern in Sochi! There have been suicide bombers and many other forms of bomb threats. The athletes are under MAX security and in my opinion need to be because they are in danger because of the way their society is over there and the current issues they have been dealing or not dealing with.

Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, February 18, 2014 2:57 PM

The Olympics being held in Sochi, Russia concern many across the globe. Located very close to neighboring terrorists, Olympic athletes question whether it is safe to go or not. ESPN discusses the concerns, threats and  increase of security at the games this year. 

Jess Deady's curator insight, April 30, 2014 8:29 PM

The Olympic games only come around every four years. From a spectators point of view, these games are a worldwide phenomenon. Millions of people will be watching them from home and in attendance in Sochi. Threats against HUGE events like these need to be taken seriously. Whether or not they are realistic, with so many lives in potential danger Russia needs to take the threats seriously.

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Geography of Soccer in the US

Geography of Soccer in the US | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

" 549 players from 62 different countries play in MLS in the United States"


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Mr Ortloff's curator insight, October 8, 2013 11:40 PM

Perfect example of cultural diffusion.

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 16, 2013 3:59 AM

I am a huge soccer fan and with that i also have to say i tend to neglect the MLS due to its lack of talent. The problem in the past with the MLS was that it was too home grown and their wasnt many international players to provide a wider demographic in the leauge which also means worse players. But with the MLS signing some big names from around the world such as Henry from France Beckham from Uk and Cahill from the AU the MLS is growing in popularity around the world and is soon to be a globally viewed leauge. This is a map of where the nearly 600 MLS players come from and it goes to show the more nations you can represent the bigger crowd demographic you can draw in.

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, March 19, 2014 5:25 PM

There are 35 MLS players that came from Africa according to the article. In America soccer or football in Europe is not that popular it is more like our baseball or football then like the soccer over there. (That is their "past time") In America we have a large population that play sports but specifically soccer we do not have that many participants that involve themselves in this , I think part of the reason is that abroad soccer is so important to them and they try to flourish from that sport onto tournments and other MLS players go for the cup. Oppose to America and our excitment about the NFL and MBL.

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All-Star Final Vote Distribution Visualization

All-Star Final Vote Distribution Visualization | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Data visualization of the 2013 MLB All-Star Final Vote distribution

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Kaylin Burleson's curator insight, July 14, 2013 1:34 PM

AnotherAa other great geography source

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Brazil: Protests & Demonstrations

Brazil: Protests & Demonstrations | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"Protests are ongoing in Brazil as people took to demonstrating against high World Cup spending....the unrest is the worst the nation has seen in two decades."


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James Parker's comment, July 4, 2013 7:27 AM
That's really something eye catchy !
Nathan Chasse's curator insight, February 28, 2014 10:18 PM

These pictures show some of large scale protesting that occurred last year due to public transport fare and tax increases. The people are angry how little the government is helping with public education, healthcare, security, and transportation. The apparent cause of the tax increases was to help Brazil host the World Cup soccer games this year, which has caused the people to believe that their government cares more about soccer than them.

 

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, October 30, 2014 8:07 PM

With all eyes on Brazil, the country is showing the world that it is more than just the world cup. Having protests in the media, Brazil is seen as a more than just a country with beautiful scenery and one with unrest due to political corruption and tax increases that effect the entire country.

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A 'Ziggy' Path to the NFL

Ezekiel "Ziggy" Ansah's journey to the NFL, beginning as a walk-on to the Brigham Young University football team from Accra, Ghana, who had never played foot...

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Seth Dixon's comment, April 26, 2013 7:36 PM
I have (and forgot that's where the nugget of the 'hockey' idea came from). I just wish I had those cool glasses! Poor Eagles, Ziggy is ultimate high risk/high reward pick.
megan b clement's curator insight, October 13, 2013 12:30 AM

"The article discusses Ziggy who is orginally from Ghana who came to America and usually played soccer. As a result of coming to America and his profound athletic ability adjusted to the American tradition of playing football one of America's number one past times. He came into a foreign country and not only made it his home but made football a challlenge he was going to conquere. It was not always easy but with the talent, right tools, and the right people to inspire and push him he is one of the best players in 2013."

Liam Michelsohn's curator insight, October 31, 2013 1:53 PM

The story of Ziggy is a great one; it not only shows how hard work and perseverance pay off, but also the importance of cultural diffusion. After hearing how ziggy grew up it was clear that he had some natural athletic talent, but with out the ability to come to school in America he would have never had a chance to explore his football abilities. I liked how in the video they showed a clip of him talking to the head coach when he first asked to play and he said, “ You know this isn’t soccer.” And Ziggy responded by saying, “Yes I understand but if you give me a chance I believe I can do well.”

This just shows how much geography can limit possibilities, Ziggy had never even had the opportunity to try out, train or play football from a young age. I guess it all kind of reminds me of how America is really a land of opportunities, and how a sophomore at BYU with no prior football experience can go to being the 2013 number five overall draft pick in the NHL.

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Baseball Geography Lesson


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 1, 2013 9:57 AM

This resource has grade-level appropriate lessons on the spatial diffusion of of teams and the cultural geography of the baseball. 


Tags: NCGE, sport, diffusion, K12.

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Super Bowl rooting interests

Super Bowl rooting interests | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Facebook Data Science wrote a note titled NFL Fans on Facebook. Read the full text here.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 31, 2013 7:30 AM

Who is rooting for which team in the Super Bowl?  How does regional geography play a role in this distribution of the data captured in this map? 

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More than a club: FC Barcelona and Catalonia's road to independence

As Catalonia goes to the polls, Sid Lowe looks at one of the region's great cultural sporting icons and its role in Catalan identity...

 

Sports and cultural identity of a region are often intertwined. As Catalonia is poised to break from Spain, this video shows how the local teams (especially FC Barcelona) are at the center of political identity and part of the very fabric of the political movement that is pushing for independence.  For more, see this recent GITN.

 

Tags: sport, Spain, Europe, devolution, autonomy.


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 12, 2013 12:54 PM

Sports and cultural identity of a region are often intertwined. As Catalonia is poised to break from Spain, this video shows how the local teams (especially FC Barcelona) are at the center of political identity and part of the very fabric of the political movement that is pushing for independence.  For more, see this recent Geography in the News article.


Tags: sport, Spain, Europe, devolution, autonomy.

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, October 30, 2014 9:10 PM

As a soccer fan and a fan of FC Barcelona, Whenever I watch FC Barcelona play against Real Madrid, the commentators always describe both clubs as a symbol of independence and the symbol of political identity. Both teams are embodiments of the struggle that Spain and Catalonia are going through.

Bob Beaven's curator insight, February 19, 3:01 PM

As a soccer fan (although of CR7 in La Liga), I know that Barca has the saying "Mes que un club" which means more than a club in the Catalan language.  FCB's colors, in fact, represent the colors of Barcelona, which is the major force in the region of Catalonia.  The club allows the ethnic people to express pride in their heritage, and allowed them in the Franco era, a freedom of expression that was not otherwise granted to them.  However, as the video discusses, FCB cannot be the main force for the region's independence, that will have to come from the people pressing the people to the Spanish Government.  However, FCB represents for the Catalans a pride in having their own unique culture, and being a unique people different than ethnic Spaniards.  Barca being more than a club is far different from the BPL team of Manchester United or the La Liga club of Real Madrid.  While these clubs may represent regions within the countries, they do not represent regions who are different than the status quo.  Followers of Man U are not very different than the Southern English (they are not their own people).  I think it is highly interesting how sports teams can mean so much to certain regions.

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Amazing animated infographic look at various world stats

Amazing animated infographic look at various world stats | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Amazing animated infographic look at various world statistics in Oceania vs. Europe vs. America vs. Africa vs. Asia, from population to homicides to number of billionaires – a fine example of how to...

 

The video doesn't have captions to denote which continent is which, otherwise this is an excellent data visualization of global and regional differences, using the theme of the Olympics as it's symbolic motif. 


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Abby Budorick's comment, September 2, 2012 12:14 PM
This is such a cool idea. I love how they used olympic rings to represent the different continents. I just wished they would've put which rings represented which continents during the whole video because it was kind of confusing. Also, I don't think they should've combined the Americas because I think they are so different and the stats would probably be very different.
Bradford Baumstark's comment, September 2, 2012 5:44 PM
The idea hat they had for this video was very interesting but it was also very confusing because they didn't tell us which color was which continent. The concted words at the beginig confused me a bit too because I'm not sure where Oceania even is.