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One Place, Two Names

One Place, Two Names | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
The government of the People’s Republic of China calls the country’s westernmost region Xinjiang, but the people who have lived there for centuries refer to their home as Eastern Turkistan. Many times when two groups do not refer to a place by the same name, it points to a cultural or political conflict, as is the case here.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 15, 11:23 AM

Multiple names on the map can hint at bigger cultural and political fault lines.  Is it Londonderry or just Derry?  The Sea of Japan or the East Sea?  This article I wrote for the National Geographic Education Blog is on the always simmering tensions in the China's westernmost province.  


TagsCentral Asia, toponyms, culture, political, conflictgovernance, China, East Asia, religionIslam, landscape.

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, April 15, 1:09 PM

This is definitely not the first time a dynamic like this happens and it will not be the last.  Whenever a country tries to incorporate a territory inhabited by a people with a different culture than their own into their sphere friction occurs.  Just like in Africa after the Berlin Conference, the Europeans experienced most resistance due to splitting up ethnic groups or making them live within the same realm as an enemy or outside group.  The indigenous people of Xinjiang, China are not Han Chinese.  They speak and identify more with a Turkish identity.  It is not hard to see that there is a big conflict of interest in the Northwestern corridor of China.

Bob Beaven's curator insight, April 16, 2:06 PM

This blog is interesting as it shows that China is not afraid of suppressing ethnic minorities to advance its goals.  As a social studies education major, with a focus in history, this reminds me of the USSR of old in a way.  Both countries contain ethnic minorities that are marginalized and discriminated against.  China's treatment of the people in Xinjiang or Eastern Turkistan as the natives call it is horrible.  The Communist Government is creating a culture that will push back, increasingly aggressively to the it.  If China doesn't handle this situation wisely, a Chechnya type situation could arise in the region.  China should do its best to prevent this, as this could be detrimental as the country would have to fight insurgents in its borders and it could become a target of the world wide Jihad of radicals in the Middle East.  As interesting as this article is, I actually never heard of this region, unlike Tibet which I learned about in High School.  However, as I said before this region has the possibility to influence the globe and China's reaction also plays into this situation.

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Quiz on the Differences Between Sunni and Shia Islam

Quiz on the Differences Between Sunni and Shia Islam | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Most of the world's major religions are made up of multiple sects or denominations, and Islam is no different. Islam's two major sects are the Sunnis and the Shiites, and the division and interplay between the two is a major factor in the geopolitics of the Middle East. How well do you understand Sunni and Shiite Islam? Take our quiz and find out!

Via Seth Dixon, Dean Haakenson
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BEAULIEU ADRIEN's curator insight, March 26, 5:53 AM

Comprenez la différence entre sunnites et shiites facilement grace à cet article;

Jared Medeiros's curator insight, March 29, 4:17 PM

 A nice little quiz that tests your knowledge on Sunni and Shia Islam.  I myself scored a 69 so there is much to learn for me on the differences between the 2.  The Shia are thought of as the more extreme of the two sects, so I was shocked to see that Hussein and Bin Ladin were both Sunni.  The complications between these two are important to know about as they are making headlines in world news.  Its tough to understand these people when you know nothing about their history.

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, April 6, 10:19 PM

After taking this class about Political Islam I thought I knew about Sunni and Shiite Islam.  Taking this quiz I definitely mixed up a lot of the information.  It seems like it would be simple to understand the differences and the similarities, but they are so parallel its easy to get the information mixed up.  

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Our Blessed Homeland

Our Blessed Homeland | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it



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Evan Margiotta's curator insight, March 19, 3:45 PM

How we view each other is often incredibly rash. This cartoon displays this very well. Other cultures often seems as alien as other species. However if one looks closely they can find many similarities in their cultures. This misunderstanding of culture has been at the root of many disputes and the understanding of culture has been the road to understanding  and peace. Unit 3 Culture

Michael Amberg's curator insight, March 22, 2:24 PM

This picture definitely sums up almost all the wars in history, how one side is right, and one side is wrong, but according to the two sides the enemy is the one who is evil.

Paul Farias's curator insight, April 9, 12:55 PM

This is great because we are taught historically what our side sees. For instance, when Britain was fighting us they saw us a rebelious bunch, and we saw them as tyrannical. Now this is where we need to see we need a fair 

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Proportion of Catholics in Latin America has dropped 25% since 1970

Proportion of Catholics in Latin America has dropped 25% since 1970 | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"A new report released by the Pew Research Centre has found that the proportion of Catholics in Latin America has dropped 25% since 1970. One of the primary drivers for the rise in the numbers leaving the Catholic Church? Conversion to Protestantism."


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Jason Schneider's curator insight, January 28, 5:00 PM

I've watched Passion of the Christ and one thing that I've learned was that the language that was spoken in Jerusalem was Latin. Regardless of whether someone was raised Catholic or Protestant, they still practiced the Christianity faith. Also based on one scoop that I looked up, Christianity was spread overseas from Europe to Latin America (South America).

Lena Minassian's curator insight, February 4, 7:11 PM

This article was interesting to read because it shows a different aspect of Latin America and touches on religion. It states that the portion of the area that is Catholic has dropped 25% since 1970 because the Protestant percentage has gone up and reached 19%. The reason that the Protestant percentage has risen is because many of those individuals have converted when the majority of them have been raised Catholic. These individuals all have different reasons as to why they converted over but this jump is more recent and continues to grow. 

Norka McAlister's curator insight, February 14, 7:45 PM

The rate of people who religiously identify as Catholics has decreased sharply in the last forty years. In Latin America, where majority of population exhibit strong beliefs in Catholicism, citizens are rapidly shifting to different religions such as Protestant, or denouncing their religion all together. New generations are skeptical to believe in God. However, the new century has also brought about different issues, where practicing Catholics are reportedly victims of sexual abuse, sometimes by their parish priest. Furthermore, younger generations are more open minded and accepting of controversial topics such as gay marriage, homosexuality, and lesbianism. Demographic patterns have shifted these large communities and suffered a decrease of numbers equal to approximately 20%. With new innovations, technologies, and different patterns of living, the Catholic Church is being overlooked by more communities as a preferred religion.

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Peru Is Indignant After Greenpeace Makes Its Mark on Ancient Site

Peru Is Indignant After Greenpeace Makes Its Mark on Ancient Site | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
A sign urging environmental action during a United Nations summit meeting on climate change was placed near a 1,000-year-old geoglyph that is a cultural treasure in Peru. Officials are outraged over the trespassing and the disturbance of the ancient grounds.

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Jared Medeiros's curator insight, January 28, 9:27 PM

Greenpeace might have went too far on this one.  It is one thing to want to protest something or have your voice heard, but to break the law, especially doing so in such a highly recognizable and sacred place, is stupid and makes them look really bad.  To think that a simple "i'm sorry'' is going to get them off the hook is ludicrous.  They need to be charged and made an example off.  If they get off with just an apology, they could be potentially opening up the floodgates for other protests or lobbyists to do the same thing in other highly recognizable places. They probably could have done this through computer imaging to get their point across and nobody would be upset and nothing destroyed.  Great job Greenpeace! 

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, March 5, 2:22 PM

At first I thought this was pretty interesting way to go about delivering a message.  But I can see why they are angry.  It's actually bizarre that Greenpeace would be ignorant enough to trample a historic area when they are a group that works to save and preserve.  Ironic eh?

Brian Wilk's curator insight, March 22, 1:45 PM

Greenpeace indeed has a problem on its hands. What could be more sacred than the Nazca lines in Peru? The banner they placed, no doubt looking for attention to their cause, backfired as environmentally they damaged the area around "hummingbird" Nazca drawing. One of the commenters on the original article got it right; why not photo-shop the banner with the technology available to make your point? This is analogous to the lead singer of Four Non-Blondes accepting an award from PETA while wearing leather pants!  Be respectful of other civilizations sacred grounds and the message will be heard much more clearly. It'll be hard for Greenpeace to spin this in their favor, they have apologized but the Peruvian government has asked for more. Greenpeace might want to think about funding a restoration project for the very lines they disturbed at Nazca.

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Mistrust Threatens Delicate Balance at a Sacred Site in Jerusalem

Mistrust Threatens Delicate Balance at a Sacred Site in Jerusalem | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
A site in the Old City of Jerusalem, known to Jews as the Temple Mount and to Muslims as the Noble Sanctuary, has been a flash point since the advent of modern Zionism.

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Bob Beaven's curator insight, March 19, 3:29 PM

Landmarks can have powerful meanings to different groups of people.  The Dome of the Rock is a sacred site to Muslims across the world.  The Mosque has stood on the location for centuries, and it is said to be built on the site where Mohamed ascended to Heaven.  To Jews, however, this site represents where Solomon's Temple was located.  It was destroyed two times, once by the Babylonians and another time, after being rebuilt by the Roman Empire.  Today, all that remains of this sacred site is the Western Wall.  The Wall is a sacred location to many Jews as it represents their heritage and their nation.  Yet, as the article notes, many Muslims are threatened by the new Jewish interests in the site and they fear that it will be taken by the Israeli government and the Temple will be rebuilt a third time on the Temple Mount.  This shows how much emotion can exist over a piece of land.  The Jewish need to rebuild their temple right on the very spot it once stood, it cannot be built elsewhere, meanwhile some Muslims deny that the Temple ever stood there and there are others who believe that the site should be renamed to "Al Aqsa Mosque or the Noble Sanctuary".  This is one of the great arguments that I believe will never be solved, should the Temple be rebuilt at the expense of the Dome of the Rock?  

 

Molly McComb's curator insight, March 21, 4:03 PM

Sacred sites in Jerusalem are having difficulties due to the differences in culture from the surrounding countries. 

Raychel Johnson's curator insight, March 22, 12:19 AM

Summary: This article is simply over the Israel-Palestine conflict, and how it has evolved since its beginning. This mostly talks about how Palestine believes that if Israel gains control of Jerusalem, they will get rid of Dome of the Rock, an important place of worship for the Islams. 

 

Insight: I think this article accurately represents concepts of political power and territoriality well due to the fact that these two territories are having a very long dispute about this one piece of land. I think there is definitely a solution that should be relatively simple, but with the amount of meaning this location has to both places, and with the continues terrorism occurring, I don't know if a simple solution would work. 

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The myth of religious violence

The myth of religious violence | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
The popular belief that religion is the cause of the world’s bloodiest conflicts is central to our modern conviction that faith and politics should never mix. But, Karen Armstrong writes, the messy history of their separation suggests it was never so simple

 

After a bumpy beginning, secularism has undoubtedly been valuable to the west, but we would be wrong to regard it as a universal law. It emerged as a particular and unique feature of the historical process in Europe; it was an evolutionary adaptation to a very specific set of circumstances. In a different environment, modernity may well take other forms. Many secular thinkers now regard “religion” as inherently belligerent and intolerant, and an irrational, backward and violent “other” to the peaceable and humane liberal state – an attitude with an unfortunate echo of the colonialist view of indigenous peoples as hopelessly “primitive”, mired in their benighted religious beliefs. There are consequences to our failure to understand that our secularism, and its understanding of the role of religion, is exceptional. When secularisation has been applied by force, it has provoked a fundamentalist reaction – and history shows that fundamentalist movements which come under attack invariably grow even more extreme. The fruits of this error are on display across the Middle East: when we look with horror upon the travesty of Isis, we would be wise to acknowledge that its barbaric violence may be, at least in part, the offspring of policies guided by our disdain.

 

Tags: religion, culture, conflict, political, geopolitics.


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Jacob Crowell's curator insight, October 27, 2014 12:10 PM

Xenophobia is the fear of the other. The fear of other religions as being violent and extreme is perfectly described as xenophobia. Many of the developed countries like to simply religious regimes as violent, backwards, or oppressive because they do not fit the mold that they operate in. This article shows that the violence that occurs in the name of religion may actually be a response to the rest of the world trying to stop religions involvement in government. In the 1980s when the USSR tried to overthrow Afghanistan, religious fighters like Osama Bin Laden grew their influence and became more extreme as a result. Religion can be used as a force of good in politics but what ends up happening is because many view Religion and politics are realms that need to be separate, their efforts to keep them separated result in the creation of extremist and hatred. Developed countries are so quick to place the place on the other for violent religious regimes when they should be focusing on the part they played in helping create the problem. 

Edelin Espino's curator insight, December 5, 2014 12:13 PM

I would say that Religious Has nothing to do with war but there has been several religious problems in this world, so when it comes to war and religious I don't even know what to think, since God means peace no war. Religious is now separate from political issues, and this is perhaps a good idea but again, I don't know what to think about it.

Evan Margiotta's curator insight, March 19, 5:12 PM

This is a very intelligent article about the problems of secularism in our modern world. "An attitude with an unfortunate echo of the colonialist view of indigenous peoples" has an incredibly sardonic feeling to it. Secularism has been a favorite mindset of Americans in recent years. This is a great mistake in my opinion. Religion is such an easy thing to stereotype and Americans have done just that. Unit 3 Culture

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The world as it is: The influence of religion

The world as it is: The influence of religion | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"Seldom has it been more important for Americans to form a realistic assessment of the world scene. But our current governing, college-­educated class suffers one glaring blind spot.

Modern American culture produces highly individualistic career and identity paths for upper- and middle-class males and females. Power couples abound, often sporting different last names. But deeply held religious identities and military loyalties are less common. Few educated Americans have any direct experience with large groups of men gathered in intense prayer or battle. Like other citizens of the globalized corporate/consumer culture, educated Americans are often widely traveled but not deeply rooted in obligation to a particular physical place, a faith or a kinship."


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Evan Margiotta's curator insight, March 18, 12:26 PM

With the rise and fall of human civilizations have come the rise and fall of religions as well. Americans have grown unaware of the  beliefs and teachings of other religions. They do not know the difference between ethnic and universalizing religions. They do not know that Islam is the fastest expanding religion in the world even though Christianity still has the most followers. Unit 3 Culture

Molly McComb's curator insight, March 21, 3:57 PM

This article shows how religion affects the world around us and its importance in governments.

Cade Bruce's curator insight, March 22, 6:48 PM

It is interesting how associated with religion some places are, and how it can influence the majority of the things they do. Here in America, I have no large religious obligations, and people can exist independent of them. However that is not the case for the rest of the world like Russia and the Middle East. Religions has influenced humanity in many ways in many places. This belongs under the category of Religion and sacred space, because it deals with religion.

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Malaysia's 'Allah' controversy

Malaysia's 'Allah' controversy | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Is limiting the use of the Arabic word for God a sign of growing intolerance towards minorities?

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 23, 2014 3:31 PM

In Arabic, the word Allah means God.  Christian Arabs refer to God as Allah and Arabic versions of the Bible reference Allah.  As Arabic and Islam have diffused in interwoven patterns, the linguistic root and the theological meanings have became intertwined to some.  BBC World and Al-Jazeera have reported on this issue as the Malaysian government has attempted to ban the use of the word Allah to any non-Muslim religious group.  Language and religion just got very political.  


Tags: languagereligion, political, Malaysia, SouthEastAsia, culture, Islam.

Caterin Victor's curator insight, June 25, 2014 4:25 PM

 Yes !!  The religion of love and peace, is not a religion, and sure that  not a pacific love,  just a bunch of hatred and criminals wich endanger  the  world, in the name  of a pedophile crazy, Muhamad, and  and  inexisting  allah, a  Devil, not a  God !!  The  Obama`s   "Holly  Curan ", a  dirty   instruction book  for killing !! 

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The Origins Of The Shiite-Sunni Split

The Origins Of The Shiite-Sunni Split | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
The division between Islam's Shiite minority and the Sunni majority is deepening across the Middle East. The split occurred soon after the death of the Prophet Muhammad, nearly 1,400 years ago.

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Bob Beaven's curator insight, March 19, 3:13 PM

The two different branches in Islam are factors that contribute greatly to not being able to solve the problems occurring in the Middle East today.  This article gives the context on how the split happened and why geography played a role in what went on.  I think that it is very interesting that there is such a large number of Sunni's compared to Shiites.  Yet, the Shiites have remained influential in spite of the fact that they are outnumbered.  As the article says, a large number of Iranians and Iraqis (in the South) are of this branch.  In fact, Saddam Hussein was a Shiite and he ruled brutally over the country, killing people from each group (probably the only reason he could hold the country together was through fear).  Yet, Iran, in the other case, was not always Shiite, a invasion which occurred had the religion introduced to a once Sunni dominated area.  Yet, the European nations which came to the Middle East and divided it after the fall of the Ottoman Empire did not know about all this history, so when they divided countries they just drew borders.  In my opinion, because of the borders of the countries in the Middle East, as well as the rivalry between the two different faiths it is hard to hold such divided countries together.  

Jason Schneider's curator insight, March 19, 8:11 PM

The Islam-Sunni favors the father-in-law of Muhammad Abu Bakr and is strictly orthodox. The Islam-Shi'ite favors Muhammad's son-in-law Ali and it mostly practiced in Iran, southern Iraq and southern Lebanon. Sunni on the other hand is practiced throughout the northern part of Africa and throughout the whole middle east. In the middle east, 85% of the muslim population between Sunni and Shi'ite is Sunni and 15% practices Shia. Between Sunni and Shi'ite, Sunni appears to be the more popular and dominant Islamic religion.

David Lizotte's curator insight, March 31, 5:04 PM

The middle east is a topic of discussion for people throughout America. I say the Middle East in a broad sense because there are a numerous amount of topics one could discuss in regards to the middle east. Politics, violence, terrorism, the faith of Islam in general, the list goes on. But it seems not many people go into the Sunni Shiite conflict in depth. In order to understand much of what goes on in the Middle East one needs to understand the two divisions between Islam, why they exist and what has been the history/significance of the relationship. I wonder sometimes if the people reporting the news realize what they are saying, whom the people/groups of people involved are, and what the significance of there being is. The video shown in class involving the two news reporters discussing/asking questions  about the Middle East with a scholar on the show definitely proved people are ignorant to the Middle East. They painted it with a "broad brush." If they can't even realize the vast size of Islam and the fact that they are generalizing when reporting terrorism thus linking the faith of Islam in general to it then I can only imagine what it would do to their heads to find out that there are two main divisions of Islam. It's bad when the people reporting the news don't understand the significance of what they are saying. It raises questions as to how the American people, whom are not well versed in the Middle East, interpret Islam and its people. Reading articles and listening to discussions would certainly help educate people and honestly this "scoop" was very clear in stating the origin, meaning, and significance of the two different divisions.  

I find the oil situation in the Middle East interesting to say the least. The Shiite's are the clear minority in Islam yet they control 80% of the Middle East's oil. It is crazy to think how the Safavid Dynasty set up shop in what is now Iran... In time Iran would prove to be rich in oil. Other parts of the middle east that are extremely rich in oil like southern Iraq, the eastern region of the Arabian Peninsula and Lebanon are also Shiite. So in this case the minority has access to and controls an extreme amount of wealth. I'm sure there are people whom discuss the Middle East and oil yet don't know the religious aspects of the territory. Just through taking five minutes to read an article such as this an individual may form a different perception of Islam or specifically, in regards to this paragraph, oil in the Middle East. 

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Muslims around the world celebrate the birth of Mohammed

Muslims around the world celebrate the birth of Mohammed | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"Muslims around the world celebrate the birth of the Islamic Prophet Muhammed, who was born in Mecca, Saudi Arabia in 570 AD. His birthday is marked in way ways is different Muslim countries."  


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Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, March 26, 2014 2:50 PM

Muslims rejoice, celebrate and honor Mohammed around the world on his birthday. These photos not only represent the celebrations of Mohammed but mark his lasting legacy and influence as an Islamic Prophet.

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 5, 2014 2:53 PM

It is nice to see a depiction of the celebrations and happiness of Muslims instead of just violence by radicals. Muslims are frequently misrepresented by the heavy news coverage of the tiny amount of evildoers. It would be like depicting all of the US as Klan members.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, November 4, 2014 1:52 PM

Women and Men in some Islamic countries live entirely different lives in regards to their geographic spheres. The women dominate the private sphere, they are sheltered from the public sphere. Their architecture reflects that fact. Windows and balconies are constructed so people can see out but not see in from the street. Homes are built so the houses across from one another are not lined up with the front doors directly across from one another. Streets are winding and made so the homes are extremely private. This reflects society in regards to how people view gender. Females are kept out of the public sphere and when they do venture out into the streets, they are encouraged to have a male escorting them. This image above shows the balcony as a barrier keeping females "protected" from the public sphere.

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Muslims masquerade as Hindus for India jobs

Muslims masquerade as Hindus for India jobs | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Facing religious discrimination in the Hindu-dominated job market, many are forced to assume fake identities.

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Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 9:11 PM

In the marketplace, one of a different religion has to mask her true identity to be able to sell the food there. Not only is this woman facing pure discrimination she is facing it because of what she believes in. Nothing is more horrible than being stripped away from something you believe in. In order for her to sell food in this marketplace, she must do so to survive.

Jackson and Marduk's curator insight, October 27, 2014 4:03 PM

Religion: The main religion in India is Hindu. Since this is so widely practiced in India, other religions are discriminated. This article explains how some people have to act like they practice Hindu just to get a job.

Bob Beaven's curator insight, April 2, 3:39 PM

Having to masquerade as a different religion in order to get a job is not a concept that most Americans are familiar with, as we live in a highly secular society.  India, which too is supposed to be a secular society, is failing at this as the article shows.  Muslim women have to pretend to be Hindus in order to get a job, as many Hindus (who are dominant in India) will refuse to higher people who follow Islam.  There are historical reasons for this, as the Hindus of the country were dominated by the Muslims for years under the Mughal Empire.  However, it is a sad fact that the secular country of India which is striving towards becoming a superpower would treat citizens of a different faith in such a poor manner.  This is very interesting for Americans to think about, and it even parallels our history.  In the 19th Century and even the earlier 20th century we were much more aware of religions and ethnicity and these groups stuck together, however by the time of the 1960s and 70s this landscape was rapidly disappearing.  India should itself move on from this practice, yet I believe it will be difficult given the nature of the situation, and the baggage carried by the groups.

 

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Hijab: Veiled in Controversy

Hijab: Veiled in Controversy | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Hijab is an Islamic concept of modesty and privacy, most notably expressed in women’s clothing that covers most of the body.

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Norma Ellis's curator insight, September 2, 2013 7:27 AM

 understanding difference

Shelby Porter's comment, September 19, 2013 2:39 PM
The hijab has become a very controversial issue on the global scale. For example, Saudi Arabian and Iran women are required to wear it where as other countries (most recently France) have banned the wearing of such religious garments. Under the U.S. constitutions first amendment of freedom of speech and freedom of religion allows the women to wear them. For many women it is a choice of modesty or a way to show her devotion to her religion. Many people today still are uneducated about the topic and see it as a way these women are being oppressed. Ultimately it is that woman's choice, but it is a shame that in some places it may come with a price.
Mary Rack's comment, September 19, 2013 3:20 PM
Thank you, Shelby!!
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What is the future of the world's religions?

According to new Pew Research demographic projections, by 2050 there will be near parity between Muslims (2.8 billion, or 30% of the population) and Christians (2.9 billion, or 31%), possibly for the first time in history. Read more at http://pewrsr.ch/projections.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 2, 1:43 PM

This video is a sneak peak at some of the statistical projections from the Pew Research Center on what the world of religion will look like in 2050.  Here are the other highlights: 

  • The number of Muslims will nearly equal the number of Christians around the world.
  • Atheists, agnostics and other people who do not affiliate with any religion – though increasing in countries such as the United States and France – will make up a declining share of the world’s total population.
  • The global Buddhist population will be about the same size it was in 2010, while the Hindu and Jewish populations will be larger than they are today.
  • In Europe, Muslims will make up 10% of the overall population.
  • India will retain a Hindu majority but also will have the largest Muslim population of any country in the world, surpassing Indonesia.
  • In the United States, Christians will decline from more than three-quarters of the population in 2010 to two-thirds in 2050, and Judaism will no longer be the largest non-Christian religion. Muslims will be more numerous in the U.S. than people who identify as Jewish on the basis of religion.
  • Four out of every 10 Christians in the world will live in sub-Saharan Africa.


Tags: religionpopulation, culture, unit 3 culture.

Alex Lewis's curator insight, April 6, 10:07 AM

The changing religion percentages expected for 2050 show how the world is changing in terms of ethnicity and religion. Muslims will make up about the same percentage as Christians do, which is surprising to me. Hindu and Jewish populations will continue to grow sufficiently, while Buddhism will remain the same. 

 

                                            -A.L.

Alan Frumkin's curator insight, April 7, 7:11 PM

añada su visión ...

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On St. Patrick’s Day, Mexico remembers the Irishmen who fought for Mexico against the US

On St. Patrick’s Day, Mexico remembers the Irishmen who fought for Mexico against the US | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Amid the celebrations this St Patrick's Day, there are also more somber commemorations taking place. In Mexico and in a small town in Galway, Ireland, they are remembering the hundreds of Irishmen who died fighting for Mexico against the United States: the San Patricio Battalion.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 18, 10:20 AM

On St. Patrick's Day and afterward, many people shared happy pictures of Ireland, and that's lovely but I wanted this story.  This is not a well-known story in the United States because it reveals the cultural prejudice against the Irish that was prevalent in the United States in the 1840s.  I first learned about them in Mexico City, walking by a monument, that memorialized St. Patrick's Battalion.  They were a group of soldiers that deserted from the U.S. army and chose to fight with their Catholic brethren on the Mexican side.  


Questions to Ponder: Why are these historical events not usually mentioned in the U.S. national narrative?  Why is this seen as very significant for Mexican national identity?  What were the 'axes of identity' that mattered most to the those in St. Patrick's Battalion?   

 

Tags ethnicitywar, Mexico, Irish, racismreligion.

Connor Hendricks's curator insight, March 23, 4:40 PM

This is a good way to show how countries can work togeter and respect each other. A group of irishmen fought to defend mexico during the Mexican-American war

 

Jacob McCullough's curator insight, March 23, 6:44 PM

This is definitely interesting this breakers down cultural barricades and sets inside differences 

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Would You Guess There Are Fewer Amish Today? You'd Be So Wrong

Would You Guess There Are Fewer Amish Today? You'd Be So Wrong | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"There’s no denying that the Amish are fascinating to the rest of us ("the English," in Amish terms).  We buy their furniture and jam, and may occasionally spot their buggies when driving on country roads through America’s heartland.  Many may not realize, however, that though the Amish make up only a tiny percentage of Americans (less than 0.1 percent), the Amish population has grown enormously since the early 1960s, with much of the increase occurring in the last two decades." 

 

Tags:  population, USA, folk cultures, culture, religion. 


Via Seth Dixon
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Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, January 27, 5:05 PM

I am surprised that there is an increase in the Amish population.  I find the reality shows about the Amish poor viewing.  Especially that goofy show Amish Mafia.  That is the worst show ever.  Why has there been an increase in the last two decades?  Are they worried about their population?  Is it an unstated rule in their society to produce X amount of offspring?  How long can they continue to keep the outside world out or at a distance?  

Joshua Mason's curator insight, January 28, 8:14 PM

I've been to "Amish Country" in Pennsylvania a couple times, most recently in 2011 on a band trip in high school. We got to tour an Amish farm house that was moved and recreated in a more modern area, specifically right next to a Target (The entrance was in the parking lot of the Target, something I couldn't help but laugh about.) I found it very interesting to learn about their culture and why they do things a certain way. I asked one of the docents if they get many converts and she said they don't but she has heard of a couple of cases. 

After that response, I was kind of surprised to read this article and find out that their community is growing, especially at such exponential rates. The family size theory though is very believable. For a community that uses farming and crafts as their main source of income, a large number of hands would be needed to help sustain the family. 

Chris Plummer's curator insight, February 15, 12:41 PM

Summary- According to this graph, it is evident that many more Amish are here today than ever before. Even though this map only displays settlements(484), more than 1 person can be living in a settlement meaning there is a lot more Amish than you would think. amish make up less then 0.1 percent of our population just showing how many people actually live in America.

 

Insight- The amish religion is growing exponentially, especially in the last two decades. (1964 - 2014). Being a folk culture, they are relativly large. They amish do not exploit their religion because of this reason as well, but with they growing population many people are taking notice of them. 

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World Religions Astonishing Facts - YouTube

World Religions Christianity Islam Judaism Hinduism Sikhism Budhism Spread of Religions by time from 3000 BC to 2000 AD. Discover the origin of religions Per...

Via Seth Dixon, Suvi Salo
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Quentin Sylvester's curator insight, March 17, 1:30 AM

This shows the major world religions and their diffusion and current impacts and geography across the world, contrasting the far reaching religions of Christianity and Islam to more isolated religions like Hinduism, which still has many followers, but just in one specific area.

Elle Reagan's curator insight, March 22, 3:17 PM

This was a nice video of good length that allowed me to see how the world is broke up into different regions. I know that religion is a main factor of how places are divided and so I thought this video was a nice visualization of that. The map with the timeline was nice to have and I liked how it gave us an estimate of how many people are following each religion today. The video also helped me see how religion can be a main factor in defining world regions.

Jacqueline Garcia pd1's curator insight, March 22, 3:26 PM

In this video we are able to see the growth and fall of religions. It was quite fascinating to see the number of people in each religion and where in the world the spread. I thought it was helpful to see the dates of events that either caused spread or destruction of religions . For example the birth of Muhammad and the Crusades. THis shows the spatial distribution of religion. 

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Incredible images capture dazzling symmetry of Iran's mosques

Incredible images capture dazzling symmetry of Iran's mosques | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"Self-taught Iranian photographer gains rare access to shoot religious buildings as they've never been seen.  It's a side of Iran the rest of the world doesn't normally get to see -- the kaleidoscopically brilliant interiors of the country's intricately designed mosques.With beautiful mosaics and stained glass framed by powerful architecture, the buildings are astounding."

 

Tags: religion, culture, Islam, Iran, Middle East.


Via Seth Dixon
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Molly McComb's curator insight, March 21, 4:25 PM

Showing the sacred spaces of Islam

Lena Minassian's curator insight, March 22, 3:47 PM

This was one of my favorite articles. We usually are very used to seeing negative sides to the Middle East and this gave it a different spin. This shows breathtaking pictures of the Mosques in Iran. This architecture isn't like anything I've seen with all of the symmetry and colors. These photos were taken by a student and were not easily taken. You have to have an eye to capture moments like this and pictures like this are not always appreciated. the detail that went into creating and designing these mosques are really special and I would love to actually see something like this in person. 

Jared Medeiros's curator insight, March 29, 4:03 PM

Amazing photos of these mosques.  The detail and color in some of these mosques are extraordinary.  This kind of brilliance in color is something that is unexpected in this part of the world where everything seems to be so bland and alike in color or style.  Its surprising that the mosques don't let professional take pictures with certain equipment inside but let tourists take photos.  I would understand if the light from a camera could cause damage to the art, but these are the people who will be able to share these beautiful pictures with the rest of the world and show that there is more to Iran than what the outside may think.

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Muslim Pilgrims Are Taking "Hajj Selfies" And Clerics Are Not Happy

Muslim Pilgrims Are Taking "Hajj Selfies" And Clerics Are Not Happy | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Clerics are reportedly condemning the latest "selfie fever" at Islam's holiest sites.

Via Clairelouise
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For Yazidis, Exile From Spiritual Homeland in Iraq Dilutes Ancient Culture

For Yazidis, Exile From Spiritual Homeland in Iraq Dilutes Ancient Culture | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Some are contemplating migration, severing ties to their holy land. Others want to stay and protect their shrines.

Via Seth Dixon, Karen Moles Rose
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Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, October 29, 2014 12:49 PM

With ISIS on the rise in Iraq they are forcibly pushing people of the Yazidi faith out of their homeland which also serves as their holy land.  This place is very sacred to them, described as being as important to them as Mecca is to Muslims.  This is giving people an extremely hard choice to make.  Do they evacuate and go into the mountains leaving their sacred homeland because of the threat of ISIS against their people, or do they stay put where their roots are and risk being killed by ISIS.  A majority of the people that live here say that they would not want to leave their land and would rather live here no matter the circumstances than live anywhere else, showing you just how dedicated these people are to the place that they live.

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 14, 2014 12:07 PM

"I cannot leave Lalish, or live without it," Pir Said said. "People, whoever they might be, are most present in their own land. When they leave it, they disappear—they melt into other communities. We're present here as a community in Lalish. If we leave, we think we will be weakened."


Many religions are incredibly tied to place. The Yazidis in Irag are a religious minority that blends ancient Mesopotamian beliefs and Zoroastrianism with Christian, Jewish, and Sufi influences. They are incredibly tied to the land, and fear that being chased out will ultimately end in the weakening of their religious community. Yazidis are no strangers to this, and in the recent past they have lost entire villages to Hussein's Arabization project. For the Yazidis, their religion is much more a way of life than just a spiritual belief. Like many different peoples, they fear that being forced to move will cause their religious community to be taken over by the beliefs and lifestyles of where they have to live.  

Molly McComb's curator insight, March 21, 3:59 PM

The Yazidis are loosing their spiritual identity due to their exile from Iraq. 

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Comparing the five major world religions

"It's perfectly human to grapple with questions, like 'Where do we come from?' and 'How do I live a life of meaning?' These existential questions are central to the five major world religions -- and that's not all that connects these faiths. John Bellaimey explains the intertwined histories and cultures of Hinduism, Judaism, Buddhism, Christianity and Islam."


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MsPerry's curator insight, September 1, 2014 9:48 AM

APHG-Unit 3

Lindley Amarantos's curator insight, September 5, 2014 9:13 AM

Great insight into our 5 major world religions.

Brett Laskowitz's curator insight, January 28, 12:06 PM

This is also a good introductory video for the Religion unit.  It will at least give students a general overview of the major world religions as a baseline of information to reference when diving deeper into the unit content.

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What does it mean when someone says they're Shia or Sunni?

What does it mean when someone says they're Shia or Sunni? | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
The words Shia and Sunni appear a lot in the news these days. But what do they mean and where did they come from?

Via Nancy Watson
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Nancy Watson's curator insight, June 21, 2014 9:24 AM

Sunni and Shia are both branches of the religion of Islam, just a Catholics and Protestants are branches of Christianity.

Annie Pack's curator insight, June 25, 2014 2:04 PM

This article could help some of you with your country profiles. 

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How religion in the US today tracks closely with geography

How religion in the US today tracks closely with geography | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
A bare majority of Americans still call themselves Protestant as other religions gain ground. But the millennial generation is more likely to reject any formal religion, and this could have political import.

Via Nancy Watson
Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks's insight:

You will relate to this article if you  have ever driven coast-to-coast across the United States.

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Nancy Watson's curator insight, February 9, 2014 9:15 AM

Interesting info on religions regions of the USA.

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TIME FOR MAPS!

TIME FOR MAPS! | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
This map shows the religions (or lack thereof) of the various leaders of the worlds countries.

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Treathyl Fox's curator insight, January 8, 2014 6:49 PM

Maps are fantastic for overviews.  Never saw a map like this one though.  It's like the invisible layer, you don't really see, but there's no denying that it's there.

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Fertility Rates in Gapminder

Fertility Rates in Gapminder | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"CATHOLIC Argentina, Mexico & Phillippines have more babies born per woman than MUSLIM Indonesia, Iran & Turkey."


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Mathijs Booden's comment, September 28, 2013 3:03 PM
Any mention of Gapminder gets an upvote from me. One of the best resources in and outside of the classroom, period.
jon inge's curator insight, October 11, 2013 5:20 PM

awesome site for development economics

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 2, 2014 6:15 PM

When watching the video it was apparetnt that for Iran during the 1950-early1970's there was an increase in fertility and then decreased to almost 1.32% in 2010. These facts were very interseting to see and the way that we as historians/ georgraphers can predict the future with the past facts.