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AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO
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The Geography of Language

"Over the course of human history, thousands of languages have developed from what was once a much smaller number. How did we end up with so many? And how do we keep track of them all? Alex Gendler explains how linguists group languages into language families, demonstrating how these linguistic trees give us crucial insights into the past."


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Catherine Smyth's curator insight, June 2, 7:45 PM

Not really primary geography but so interesting!

Woodstock School's curator insight, June 4, 6:05 AM

A good teaching tool for explaining the diversity of languages.

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, June 12, 9:38 PM

Geografia Cultural

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The 20 year history of NAFTA

The 20 year history of NAFTA | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
In the 20 years since it entered into force, the North American Free Trade Agreement has been both lauded and attacked in the United States. But to properly assess NAFTA’s record, it is important to first be clear about what the agreement has actually done. Economically speaking, the answer is a lot.

 

NAFTA was the first comprehensive free-trade agreement to join developed and developing nations, and it achieved broader and deeper market openings than any trade agreement had before.

NAFTA did that by eliminating tariffs on all industrial goods, guaranteeing unrestricted agricultural trade between the United States and Mexico, opening up a broad range of service sectors, and instituting national treatment for cross-border service providers. It also set high standards of protection for patents, trademarks, copyrights, and trade secrets.

NAFTA ignited an explosion in cross-border economic activity. Today, Canada ranks as the United States’ largest single export market, and it sends 98 percent of its total energy exports to the United States, making Canada the United States’ largest supplier of energy products and services. Mexico is the United States’ second-largest single export market. Over the past two decades, a highly efficient and integrated supply chain has developed among the three North American economies.  Intraregional trade flows have increased by roughly 400 percent.

North Americans not only sell more things to one another; they also make more things together. About half of U.S. trade with Canada and Mexico takes place between related companies, and the resulting specialization has boosted productivity in all three economies. NAFTA has also caused cross-border investment to soar.

In spite of this impressive economic record, NAFTA has its critics. Most of those who attack it on economic grounds focus on Mexico, not Canada, and claim that the partnership is one-sided: that NAFTA is Mexico’s gain and America’s pain. But the economic data prove otherwise.


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Gary Yarus's curator insight, February 19, 8:24 AM

A good review for those concerned about the Trans-Pacific Partnership.

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Online Quizzes for Regional Geography

Online Quizzes for Regional Geography | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"For Regional Geography, I ask that all my students take an online quizzes before coming to class because it is very difficult to intelligently discuss European issues if you don’t know the countries of Europe, where they are and what other countries are on their borders.  Quizzes and knowing places doesn’t define geography, but if geography were English literature, knowing about places could be described as the alphabet–before you write a sonnet or critique an essay, you better know your ABC’s and basic grammar.  Given that, I like the Lizard Point Geography quizzes, Sheppard Software quizzes and those from Click that ‘Hood; they are simple, straightforward and comprehensive."


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AckerbauHalle's curator insight, January 24, 12:44 AM

Kleiner Beitrag zur Geographie: Ein online Spiel um regionale Kenntnisse zu erweitern 

Mirta Liliana Filgueira's curator insight, February 2, 6:52 PM

Exámenes en línea para Geografía.

SFDSLibrary's curator insight, May 13, 8:16 AM

Quizzes to test a students knowledge of places and countries.

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The 7,000 Streams That Feed the Mississippi River

The 7,000 Streams That Feed the Mississippi River | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

" A new online tool released by the Department of the Interior this week allows users to select any major stream and trace it up to its sources or down to its watershed. The above map, exported from the tool, highlights all the major tributaries that feed into the Mississippi River, illustrating the river’s huge catchment area of approximately 1.15 million square miles, or 37 percent of the land area of the continental U.S. Use the tool to see where the streams around you are getting their water (and pollution)."

 


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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, August 31, 2013 2:20 AM

INland water environments

Kyle Kampe's curator insight, September 4, 2013 9:40 PM

Land use is different around Mississippi River basin.

Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 12, 2013 1:28 PM

The Mississippi River flows down the east side of the United States. Since the river is so long it has many streams that expand off it it as well. As you can see in the picture the red parts are the sections where the water has branched off the Mississippi River. It takes up almost all of the middle section of the United States. 

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Baby Name Regions?

Baby Name Regions? | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"The Social Security Administration this week released its list of 2012’s most popular baby names by state, and maybe explained why there are so many Jacobs and Sophias in your kids’ schools. Do you see your kids’ names here?"


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Time to scrap “Eastern Europe”

Time to scrap “Eastern Europe” | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Europe’s divisions are indeed grave. But counting the ex-communist countries as a single category is outdated and damaging 

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Maegan Connor's curator insight, December 17, 2013 6:23 PM

This video was insightful because it can be really challenging to classify a region in certain parts of the world. Having a simple eastern and western Europe made a tiny amount of sense at the time of WWII but it hasn't made any sense since then.  The boundaries in the southeastern part of Europe have changed on more than one occasion over the past 70 years and there are still border disputes between religious and ethnic groups that could result in new countries any day.  I found the narrator's ideas funny but still better than the traditional region that already exist.  

I personally group regions by the types of people that live in them and share very similar characteristics. Grouping parts of Europe is very hard because of the major cultural differences all over and because I am not highly educated on all of them.  I find it hard to consider Greece a part of Europe at times but it is also hard to consider it a part of anywhere else.  The countries that border Russia all seem similar to me because I don't have extensive knowledge of their cultures, although it is unfair that they are assumed to be completely impoverished countries. 

With the constantly shifting boundaries and movement of people, Europe is very hard to group into regions and that is okay because regions do not have huge effects on the way the world is run, they only make it easier to break down into pieces.

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, March 3, 11:46 AM

This video makes a good point about where we arbitrarily draw lines on a map.  He uses different groupings to show how silly this can be.  His point is that Eastern Europe no longer really exists and we should no longer use the term.  He then suggests a few different terms to use to group countries in Europe.  My favorite was the grouping called Scared of Russia.

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, March 17, 7:17 AM

This video shows how difficult it is to categorize and group regions together. We tend categorize Eastern Europe as a group due to former political affiliations with the Soviet Union, but this is unfair as these nations are varied ethnically, economically, and politically. Plus, most, if not all, of these nations resented Soviet rule and grouping them due to it is somewhat insulting. Other groupings are not as neat on a map. For example, grouping Europe economically shows a couple Eastern European countries in the upper half and a number of Western European countries like Italy, Spain, and Greece in the lower half.

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Spatial Patterns of the Gun Lobby

Spatial Patterns of the Gun Lobby | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
The National Rifle Association gives members of Congress a grade ranging from A to F.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 27, 2012 11:05 AM

Since the Newtown CT tragedy, gun control and second amendment rights have been prominent in the minds on many Americans.  Your ideological position on what should be done in th future might be in part a product of geography.  How do most people feel about the second amendment where you live?  What about your local geography might influence those opinions? 

Eliana Oliveira Burian's curator insight, December 28, 2012 6:29 AM

And you? What's your opinion about Gun Control Legislation?

Jim Bob's comment, December 28, 2012 10:07 PM
Looks like there is enough people to finally have gun licensing stiffened.
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Following 'Geography Education'

Following 'Geography Education' | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

Finding Materials: This site is designed for geography students and teachers to find interesting, current supplemental materials.  To search for place-specific posts, browse this interactive map.  To search for thematic posts, see http://geographyeducation.org/thematic/ (organized by the APHG curriculum).  Also you can search for a keyword by clicking on the filter tab above.

 

Staying Connected: You can receive post updates in the way that best fits how you use social media.

Update Notifications: Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest.

              Email: Click 'follow' button at top right of this page.

Sites with Content: Wordpress, Scoop.it.


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Emma Lafleur's curator insight, January 24, 2013 5:34 PM

A great interactive map to learn about different regions of the world.

chris tobin's curator insight, January 24, 2013 5:35 PM

This is a really cool map from class

Marie Schoeman's curator insight, February 20, 2013 4:07 AM

This site collects interesting sites on Geography Teaching. It is anticipated that there will also be articles on differentiation which could assist teachers to present Geography in an inclusive way.

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Dark Days: When the Colts Left Baltimore

A look back on the 27th Anniversary of the the NFL Colts dark flight from Baltimore in the middle of the night.

 

BM: When the Colts left they took the heart of Balitmore and left the fans in utter disbelief. Robert Irsay had no intention of staying whether he got his new staidum for the Colts or not, he wanted out and had been looking since 1976. The city of Baltimore was not going to budge on the construction of a new pubically funded stadium simply because it was too expensive and the citry didn't have the money. All that remained in Baltimore was an empty Memorial Stadium, which wasn't perfect but was in really decent shape and the Orioles. 

 

SD: Why are sports teams treated so differently from other businesses?  How are teams linked to place in such intimate ways?  What is the economic impact of a sports team on the city and how could relocation damage that city?  See this scoop.it topic for more on the cultural and economic impacts of sports teams on cities.


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Ms. Harrington's comment, August 8, 2012 9:09 AM
I never knew about this particular team, but I can see how a sports franchise abandoning a city has a devastating effect. It seems like there was a deliberate attempt to "sneak"out.
Roland Trudeau Jr.'s comment, August 8, 2012 9:16 AM
Quite a blow to the entire city of Baltimore, you can see from the older footage as well as the new how badly this effected this city. A huge impact on the people, seemingly crushing spirits across the city.
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The Border That Stole 500 Birthdays

The Border That Stole 500 Birthdays | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
The story behind the the International Date Line.

 

Not too long ago (Jan. 2012), the arbitrary International Date Line (roughly opposite the Prime Meridian) was moved to better accommodate the regional networks and economic geography of the area straddling the line.  American Samoa, although politically aligned with the United States, was functionally more integrated on the Asian side of the Pacific Rim when it came to their trade partners and their tourism base.  Dynamic economic networks, political allegiances and cultural commonalities create a beautifully complex situation near this 'border.'    


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Al Picozzi's curator insight, December 5, 2013 4:42 PM

It made sense for American Samoa to ask for the move even though it is US territory.  It is more closely linked with the economies of the China, Japan, Australia, New Zeland and South Korea.  For them to all be on the same day just makes sense.  You can coordinate things better if everyone is on the same day, financial markets and be in line when the trading day starts and ends.  Seems to me to make sense that they are on the same day as their main economic partners.

Ryan Amado's curator insight, December 11, 2013 5:42 AM

This line clearly needs to be redrawn.  It just does not make sense that it could be monday in one area and tuesday 50 miles directly south of it.  While the new dateline does not necessarily have to be perfectly straight, it should at least not go directly horizontal as it does now.  Whoever lies on the line must deal with whatever place they have been placed in, and not complain.

Marissa Roy's curator insight, December 11, 2013 11:05 AM

My class examined this and we agree that it makes sense that American Samoa would want to be those they do business with like Asia, Australia and New Zealand.  ALthough American Samoa is a US territory, it definately does more business with the countries who are nearby and therefore they should be pushed to the other side of the dateline.

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The World is all about Money

The World is all about Money | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"A world map used by Erik Penser Bankaktiebolag to visualize economic markets. The map contains approximately 3,000 coins and every continent is built out of its countries’ currencies. Used in various medias during 2009."  If you look closely you will notice that the coins are from the region that they are cartographically representing.  To see more by this artist, visit: http://www.penser.se/


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Local Life Expectancies

Local Life Expectancies | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

We often talk about life expectancy data at the national level; this simplification has a great deal of utility but obscures regional distinctions within a country.  Some counties in the United States have life expectancies on par with Japan (84), while the worst off counties are more similar to Indonesia (69).  Even more startling, in 661 counties, life expectancy stopped dead or went backwards for women since 1999.  This is a dramatic look at the importance of scale within any geographic analysis to arrive at reasonable conclusions.  So let's start looking at local demographic data instead of just nationally aggregated data.  For more on this press release, see:  http://www.healthmetricsandevaluation.org/news-events/news-release/girls-born-2009-will-live-shorter-lives-their-mothers-hundreds-us-counties


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Courtney Burns's curator insight, September 18, 2013 10:10 AM

Typically when I think about the average life expectancy today I think of how it has increased over the years. However I never thought of looking at it broken down into gender and area. When it is broken down the life expectancy of women is not increasing like it used too and in some places is even going down. In the graph it says that 54,000 women die every year because of excess salt. That stat is crazy! Even though that may not be a huge percentage of our population. It is something that can be monitored more and prevented. It would be interesting to see why people live longer in certain areas. What is it about specific areas that these people are living the longest? Even though the average life expectancy as a whole as increased I think we should look more into the decrease of life expectancy of women and why men's life expectancy's are increasing so much in comparison to women. 

Shelby Porter's comment, September 19, 2013 1:59 PM
When I hear about life expectancy the first thought that pops into my head is that the U.S. must have a great life expectancy considering all the medicines and treatments we have available. But when I read that since such a large numbers of counties have seen woman life expectancy stop dead or go backwards since 1999, I was absolutely shocked! Why was the life expectancy of women's dropping in so many more counties, an why weren't the men's life expectancy also dropping?And why is it that women live the longest in North Dakota and men in Iowa? Reading further, we see that a large percentage of women dying each year is because of excess salt and a large percentage of men dying each year is because of smoking. Both of these things can be prevented, but yet we still see many Americans do them. One good thing we learn from this is that African American males life expectancy has improved greatly over the past two decades. I would be interested to find out why that is, and if it could help the rest of the population also increase their life expectancy.
Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, October 12, 2013 5:36 PM

Life expectancies do vary.  I know that one of my grandmothers died around when she was 60, and my other grandfather just passed away at age 84.  I am 23 years old, and the difference between their death ages is close to 24; one lived a whole "one of my current lifetimes" more than the other, which is strange to think about.  All that I've ever known can fit into the time that one lived longer than the other.  Life is transient, but just that.  The "death expectancy" is that everyone will die, absolutely.  No exceptions.  I was given a paper from a friend in high school, one of those motivational readings, on "What will you do with your 'dash'?"  It referred to gravestones, ie) someone lived from 1927-2012.  The two dates aren't really what matter, but the 'dash' in between, and how we choose to spend our lives is the true part that really matters!  So know what to expect, on average and based on where you are from, and be prepared for some differences from that average, but make your 'dash' truly matter! After all, it's the most we can do...

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Regional Geography

Making the connections...

 

Thinking geographically is in essence about making the connections between themes, across regions and at a variety of scales.  


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A Map of Baseball Nation

A Map of Baseball Nation | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"Fans may not list which team they favor on the census, but millions of them do make their preferences public on Facebook. Using aggregated data provided by the company, we were able to create an unprecedented look at the geography of baseball fandom, going down not only to the county level, as Facebook did in a nationwide map it released a few weeks ago, but also to ZIP codes."


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Brian Altonen's curator insight, April 25, 7:51 PM

Anything can be mapped.  

 

This mapping did not fully account for hybridization--for example when a friend in Texas is a Boston Red Sox fan.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, April 28, 10:43 AM

unit 1 & 3

Greg Russak's curator insight, April 29, 12:53 PM

Maps and baseball - a good combination!

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The 20 year history of NAFTA

The 20 year history of NAFTA | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
In the 20 years since it entered into force, the North American Free Trade Agreement has been both lauded and attacked in the United States. But to properly assess NAFTA’s record, it is important to first be clear about what the agreement has actually done. Economically speaking, the answer is a lot.

 

NAFTA was the first comprehensive free-trade agreement to join developed and developing nations, and it achieved broader and deeper market openings than any trade agreement had before.

NAFTA did that by eliminating tariffs on all industrial goods, guaranteeing unrestricted agricultural trade between the United States and Mexico, opening up a broad range of service sectors, and instituting national treatment for cross-border service providers. It also set high standards of protection for patents, trademarks, copyrights, and trade secrets.

NAFTA ignited an explosion in cross-border economic activity. Today, Canada ranks as the United States’ largest single export market, and it sends 98 percent of its total energy exports to the United States, making Canada the United States’ largest supplier of energy products and services. Mexico is the United States’ second-largest single export market. Over the past two decades, a highly efficient and integrated supply chain has developed among the three North American economies.  Intraregional trade flows have increased by roughly 400 percent.

North Americans not only sell more things to one another; they also make more things together. About half of U.S. trade with Canada and Mexico takes place between related companies, and the resulting specialization has boosted productivity in all three economies. NAFTA has also caused cross-border investment to soar.

In spite of this impressive economic record, NAFTA has its critics. Most of those who attack it on economic grounds focus on Mexico, not Canada, and claim that the partnership is one-sided: that NAFTA is Mexico’s gain and America’s pain. But the economic data prove otherwise.


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Gary Yarus's curator insight, February 19, 8:24 AM

A good review for those concerned about the Trans-Pacific Partnership.

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Places in their Proper Perspectives

Places in their Proper Perspectives | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"A fisherman's cottage is described by real estate agents as a 'property not to be missed' but it is also just yards away from two nuclear power stations."


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Adilson Camacho's curator insight, January 31, 6:19 PM

Versões...

Fern Torres's curator insight, February 3, 4:11 PM

Perception is everything!

Jess Deady's curator insight, April 16, 1:35 PM

This house is 100% misleading. The paper advertised the first picture, which from the looks of it isn't so bad. Then when you get the reverse picture and see the nuclear power plants behind it, its a whole new scene! Whoever is trying to sell this house- good luck to you. Who wants to live next to something that could literally kill god knows what? Not me. 

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Not All English is the Same

Not All English is the Same | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"22 Maps That Show How Americans Speak English Totally Differently From Each Other"


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MelissaRossman's comment, August 30, 2013 10:50 AM
Excellent
Al Picozzi's curator insight, September 12, 2013 5:05 PM

Love these maps.  Bubbler is so right in RI and I never knew it was called that anywhere else.  However I think they got the one about the subs wrong.  I still call those sandwhiches a grinder.  I went to Texas once and ask for a grinder and I still think the guy there is laughing at me to this day.  Its really is great to see the difference though even though this is one country with many different backgrounds.

Amy Marques's curator insight, February 6, 4:29 PM

These 22 maps are a great representation of how linguistically different the United States truly is. Depending  where you are from I the US shows how you say something differently. For example, in the Northeast and South, people pronounce the word caramel in two words, "cara and mel" and in the west and west coast it is pronounced " car-mel". Even the word crayon is pronounced differently depending where you live. 

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American English Dialects

American English Dialects | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

There are 8 major English dialect areas in North America, presented on the map. These are shown in blue, each with its number, on the map and in the Dialect Description Chart below, and are also outlined with blue lines on the map.  The many subdialects are shown in red on the map and in the chart, and are outlined with red lines on the map. All of these are listed in the margins of the map as well.


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Fotografie Turismo Italia's comment, May 17, 2013 5:07 AM
I don't know this problem, sorry.
Ms. Harrington's curator insight, May 22, 2013 12:16 PM

Very cool map with links to video/audio of the local dialect.

Leslie Creath's curator insight, May 27, 2013 1:41 PM

This is fascinating to me

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Perception and Place

Perception and Place | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

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50% yes, 50% no.  The raw statistics would tell you that the country is perfectly divided on this question of whether or not the University of Alabama has the greatest college football program of all time.  Not surprising to geographers, in evenly split polls, elections, or other data results, there are oftentimes strong regional factors that influence variation in the data (in this case, local allegiances, media bias and general sport fanaticism).  

 

Questions to Ponder:  Alabama's voting pattern is obvious, what explains for some of the other poll results from particular states?  Why is there a general East/West divide on this question?  What are the regional factors that influence the voting patterns?  Would the result be different on 6 months from now?

 

Tags: sport, statistics, mapping, regions.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 8, 2013 9:56 AM

50% yes, 50% no.  The raw statistics would tell you that the country is perfectly divided on this question of whether or not the University of Alabama has the greatest college football program of all time.  Not surprising to geographers, in evenly split polls, elections, or other data results, there are oftentimes strong regional factors that influence variation in the data (in this case, local allegiances, media bias and general sport fanaticism).  


Questions to Ponder:  Alabama's voting pattern is obvious, what explains for some of the other poll results from particular states?  Why is there a general East/West divide on this question?  What are the regional factors that influence the voting patterns?  Would the result be different on 6 months from now?


Tags: sport, statistics, mapping, regions.

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Socket map of the world

Socket map of the world | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Tags: cartography, technology, globalization, historical, regions, mapping, colonialism.
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 17, 2012 3:57 PM

This map might appear to be completely trivial and it probably is.  Still, there are interesting historical and colonial patterns that can be seen in this technological culture region map. 


Questions to Ponder: Will there one day be a single format?  When?  What are barrier to that happening?  What does this tell us about the extent of globalization?

Mr Ortloff's curator insight, July 23, 2013 4:01 PM

You can map ANYTHING!!!

Justin McCullough's curator insight, December 12, 2013 1:36 PM

This map is interesting because it shows where the former British Empire had its influences , especially in British-Africa territories. The only four countries that use the light blue are all in the southern hemisphere as the article points out, and the American model can be largely seen in the western hemisphere, However, there is the American model in Saudi Arabia. It seems that the rest of the world uses the light green or the dark green models. 

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AFRITERRA: Mapping Africa

AFRITERRA: Mapping Africa | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"The AFRITERRA Foundation is a non-profit Cartographic Library and Archive assembling and preserving the original rare maps of Africa in a definitive place for education and interpretation.  This unique cartographic galleries links art, technology, and history."  The Afriterra Foundation connects people to the land, history, heritage and legacy of Africa.


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Understanding "Eat Local"

Understanding "Eat Local" | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

This Oregon-based infographic succinctly summarizes the local food movement and taps into the cultural ethos that permeates the growing number of consumers that are demanding more home-grown products.


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OverlapMaps - compare any two places

OverlapMaps - compare any two places | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
An OverlapMap is a map of one part of the world that overlaps a different part of the world. OverlapMaps show relative size.

 

The above overlap map is the United Kingdom compared to the state of Pennsylvania.  This is an very simple way to demonstrate the true size of remote places, and 'bring the discussion home.'  This site is as simple and intuitive as it is powerful and easily applicable.  This is a keeper.  


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Michael Grant's comment, September 12, 2012 4:07 PM
This toll will and can provide a reliable mapping source to geographers everywhere. It is useful and fun. A neat way to learn cartography
Josiah Melchor's comment, September 12, 2012 11:31 PM
The OverlapMap is a very useful tool that will allow a user to compare different places and parts of the world. Having a more accurate size of a place is critical when comparing 2 or more places. I think that many users besides me will find this very convenient when other resources are not available.
Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 21, 11:48 PM

The above overlap map is the United Kingdom compared to the state of Pennsylvania.  This is a very simple way to demonstrate the true size of remote places, and 'bring the discussion home.'  This site is as simple and intuitive as it is powerful and easily applicable.  This is a keeper. 

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The Connected States of America

The Connected States of America | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"This interactive map shows the county to county social interactions given in total call minutes or total number of SMS from the anonymous, aggregated AT&T mobile phone data. Click into your county or type it into the text box to find out how it is connected to other counties in the US. You can switch between call and SMS data to reveal the changes in interaction mode. Also, the population map is provided, which is based on the 2010 Census."               -Martin Daumiller 

For more from this curator, see: http://www.scoop.it/t/wit-wisdom


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Size and Politics

Size and Politics | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Revisiting an Austrian academic's call for smaller borders.

 

This New York Times article, entitled "Kohr Principles" has excellent material for students to think about the spatial organization of political interactions.  Leopold Kohr argued that size matters--and unlike most that argue for the same, he argued that political entities most not be too large.  In the map above, Kohr envisioned a Europe without countries large enough to dream of world domination.  So, how does a country's size shape its politics?  Is there an ideal size for internal unity and external security? 


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Don Brown Jr's comment, July 6, 2012 7:34 PM
I find Kohr principles interesting, but I do not think that decreasing the size of a country will reduce political turmoil or conflict. On the contrary I believe in a world divided among numerous small states, the root of all conflicts would be based upon the territorial makeup of existing states, creating a geographic security dilemma over acquiring “good” land.