AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO
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AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO
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Is Zealandia the eighth continent?

"A group of geologists say they've enough evidence to confirm the existence of a new continent. Writing in the journal of the Geological Society of America, the group named the eighth continent 'Zealandia.' Scientists argue for an 8th continent, Zealandia, in the Geological Society of America."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 8, 3:29 PM

What makes a continent a continent? There is no set definition of a continent. Some consider cultural groupings and would consider Europe as a separate continent from Asia as a consequence. Geologists consider continental shelves as the defining characteristics of a continent and thus consider Eurasia to be just one continent. We are so accustomed to seeing the coastlines, but if the ocean were drained, we'd see Zealandia and it's ancient confidential shelf--but don't expect all the continental maps in elementary schools to change anytime soon.

 

Questions to Ponder: Does human geography or physical geography determine what you consider a continent?  How come?       

 

Tags: physical, tectonics, geologyregions, Oceania.

Jeremy Hansen's curator insight, April 4, 4:08 PM
Seth Dixon's insight: What makes a continent a continent? There is no set definition of a continent. Some consider cultural groupings and would consider Europe as a separate continent from Asia as a consequence. Geologists consider continental shelves as the defining characteristics of a continent and thus consider Eurasia to be just one continent. We are so accustomed to seeing the coastlines, but if the ocean were drained, we'd see Zealandia and it's ancient confidential shelf--but don't expect all the continental maps in elementary schools to change anytime soon. Questions to Ponder: Does human geography or physical geography determine what you consider a continent? How come?
Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, April 13, 10:59 AM
unit 1
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The Sargasso Sea

"The Sargasso Sea occupies almost two thirds of the North Atlantic Ocean. Within this sea, circling ocean currents accumulate mats of Sargassum seaweed that shelter a surprising variety of fishes, snails, crabs, and other small animals. The animal community today is much less diverse than it was in the early 1970s, when the last detailed studies were completed in this region. This study shows that animal communities in the Sargasso Sea are definitely changing. The next step is to find out why."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 6, 9:58 AM

Often, we define oceans and seas based on their borders with land as their defining characteristics (this is one reason why many don't know about the Southern Ocean as a distinct body of water or consider it an ocean). The Sargasso Sea is defined by ocean currents; it is surrounded by great currents but is itself without a strong current, making it perilous for early seafarers.  These oceanic doldrums became shrouded in superstition as stories of the fabled Bermuda Triangle spread, but the truth is all in the ocean currents.   

 

Tags: water, biogeography, environment, physical.

Ivan Ius's curator insight, January 22, 7:38 PM
Geography Concepts: Spatial Significance, Patterns and Trends, Interrelationships
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Tsunami Stones: Ancient Japanese Markers Warn Builders of High Water

Tsunami Stones: Ancient Japanese Markers Warn Builders of High Water | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"Residents of Aneyoshi, Japan, heeded the warnings of their ancestors. They obeyed directions and wisdom found on a local stone monument: 'Do not build any homes below this point,' it reads. 'High dwellings are the peace and harmony of our descendants. Remember the calamity of the great tsunamis.' When the 2011 Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami devastated Japan, this village."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 4, 2016 9:25 AM

Beachfront property is beautiful real estate with enormous economic potential, but when it is in an area with a history of tsunamis, the impending threat of an earthquake looms over the coastal lowlands and limits the land use plans for the region. 

 

Tags: physical, tsunami, water, tectonics, disasters.

Ivan Ius's curator insight, December 31, 2016 1:19 AM
Geographical Concepts: Spatial Significance, Patterns and Trends, 
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Tornado Alley

Tornado Alley | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Interested in learning about tornado alley? Then you'll want to read our tornado alley facts and information. Tornado Alley 101

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 10, 2016 11:10 AM

This map nicely shows the particular air requirements needed for a tornado to form and why the part of the United States known as Tornado Alley accounts for the majority of the world's tornadoes.  This nicely shows how physical geographic factors form a major part of how a region might be defined and conceptualized. 

 

Tags: tornado, physical, weather and climate, visualization, regions.

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, November 16, 2016 5:35 PM

Atmospheric hazard

Luis Cesar Nunes's curator insight, November 17, 2016 5:56 AM
USA Tornado
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The Whale's Tail

The Whale's Tail | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"The Ballena Marine National Park is located in Puntarenas, at the South Pacific coast of Costa Rica." 


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 6, 2016 3:33 PM

This National Park in Costa Rica is a delightful example of many things geographic.  Not only is the local biogeography make this a place famous for whales (ballena in Spanish), but the physical geography also resembles a whale's tail.  This feature is called a tombolo, where a spit connects an island or rock cluster to the mainland. Additionally, there is also a great community of citizen cartographers mapping out this park and the surrounding communities. 

 

Tagsbiogeography, environment, geomorphology, physicalwater, landforms.

Alexander peters's curator insight, October 24, 2016 12:23 PM
This article was about the whale and how they were repopulating and how the whale hunting was banned in the 70s. I think this article was really good because use it talked about whales.
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Why Hurricane Categories Make a Difference

During a hurricane you usually hear meteorologists refer to its intensity by categories. If you don't know the difference between a category 1 and a category 5 hurricane, The Weather Channel meteorologist Mark Elliot breaks it down for you.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 6, 2016 1:41 PM

With Hurricane Matthew having just hit Haiti (video) and Cuba, it now poised to strike Florida. Many are unsure what the term “category 4” actually means because they are unfamiliar with the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale.  This video is a good introduction to what this means to people in the path of the hurricane. As we monitor this (and future) situation, these are my favorite digital globes that display wind speeds and a few other of Earth’s physical systems. What is beautiful and majestic from one scale can be horrific and catastrophic at another:    

 

Tagsphysical, weather and climatedisasters, mapping, visualization.

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, October 7, 2016 5:16 PM
Atmospheric / hydrologic hazards
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The Tidal Waves of the Qiantang River

The Tidal Waves of the Qiantang River | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
For hundreds of years, on the eighth month of the lunar calendar, people have gathered along the shores of China’s Qiantang River at the head of Hangzhou Bay to witness the waves of its famous bore tide. Higher-than-normal high tides push into the harbor, funneling into the river, causing a broad wave that can reach up to 30 feet high. If the waves surge over the banks, spectators can be swept up, pushed along walkways or down embankments. Below, I’ve gathered images from the past few years of the Qiantang bore tides.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 21, 2016 8:09 PM

This is an amazing set of images, where a cultural phenomenon is wrapped up in observing the pulsating physical geography of the river.  Usually the tidal bore is impressive (but not dangerous--see video here), but occasionally it can be incredibly violent (see this 2015 video).   

 

Tags: physical, geomorphologywaterChina.

Kiran's comment, September 24, 2016 8:33 AM
http://onlinemoviesvideos.com/
Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, September 28, 2016 8:56 PM

Tital bores - the values of water 

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Interactive Climate Map

Interactive Climate Map | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"Obsessed as we are with cartography we in Staridas Geography perceive any aspect of the actual 3D World as a constant opportunity for another pretty map creation!"


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 6, 2016 11:35 AM

This is a great interactive map of the world's climate zones. 

 

Tags: ESRIStoryMapedtech, GIS, mapping, cartographyphysical.

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, August 19, 2016 7:47 PM

Great map to discuss global distribution of biomes and links to climate 

Sally Egan's curator insight, August 21, 2016 6:24 PM
Fun way for students to learn about the diverse climates around the world, by selecting a location on the map students are shown the climatic data of the selected place.
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Pros and Cons of Cotton Production in Uzbekistan

Pros and Cons of Cotton Production in Uzbekistan | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"This case study considers the pros and cons of cotton production in Uzbekistan. Since the country's independence from the Soviet Union in 1991, revenues from cotton taxation have contributed substantially to developing the industrial sector, boosting the current account, achieving energy and food-grain self-sufficiency, and buffering domestic shocks in food and energy prices. Nonetheless, some argue that the state procurement system hampers the development of the agricultural sector. Often the payments for cotton hardly cover farmers' production costs, and the quasi mono-culture of cotton production has adversely affected environmental sustainability."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 16, 2016 2:26 PM

Uzbekistan is a top world producer and exporter of cotton. There are many sectors involved in managing the cotton commodity chain to partake in the production. Not only is it a source of income, but provides labor jobs and food consumption. However, the land where the cotton production takes place is suffering. This land faces many types of land degradation that has an impact on the cotton. In order to secure the land, there are possible solutions and policies to improve the agriculture and the cotton benefits. Once the world’s fourth largest lake, the Aral Sea, is located in Uzbekistan, and has had a major impact on the cotton industry. This production has given Uzbekistan a world-wide reputation in cotton production, but is also known for destroying one of the world’s largest lakes.  Just because it is your greatest economic competitive advantage, doesn't mean that it is environmentally sustainable.

 

Questions to Ponder: How much does the cotton production contribute to Uzbekistan economically? What are the solutions to address the demising Aral Sea? Who is impacted the most because of the land issues?

 

Tags:  agriculture, labor, Uzbekistan, physical, weather and climateland use, environmentAral Sea.

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Volcanic ash covers Costa Rica towns

Volcanic ash covers Costa Rica towns | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
A volcano erupts in central Costa Rica, belching smoke and ash up to 3,000m (9,840ft) into the air and choking nearby communities.

 

Tags: Costa Rica, disasters, physical, volcano.


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Animals Rule Chernobyl 30 Years After Nuclear Disaster

Animals Rule Chernobyl 30 Years After Nuclear Disaster | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Three decades later, it’s not certain how radiation is affecting wildlife—but it’s clear that animals abound.

 

It may seem strange that Chernobyl, an area known for the deadliest nuclear accident in history, could become a refuge for all kinds of animals—from moose, deer, beaver, and owls to more exotic species like brown bear, lynx, and wolves—but that is exactly what Shkvyria and some other scientists think has happened. Without people hunting them or ruining their habitat, the thinking goes, wildlife is thriving despite high radiation levels.

 

Tags: National Geographic, physical, biogeography, environment, ecology, environment modify, disasters.


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Meander? I ‘ardly know ‘er!

Meander? I ‘ardly know ‘er! | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 15, 2016 3:27 PM

This is brilliant.  I can't say how much I love this. 

 

Tagsphysical, fluvial, geomorphology, landscape, funart.

YEC Geo's curator insight, April 28, 2016 9:08 AM
Love geomorphology comics.
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Utah's Great Salt Lake is shrinking

Utah's Great Salt Lake is shrinking | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Human activity is playing a role in the dwindling size of Utah's Great Salt Lake, according to new research.While the research group acknowledged the role that climate fluctuations, such as droughts and floods, have played in the shift of the lake's water levels over time, the decrease in the lake's size is predominantly due to human causes. According to the report, the heavy reliance on consumptive water uses has reduced the lake level by 11 feet and its volume by 48 percent.

 

Tags: physical, Utah, environment modify, environment, water.


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 6, 2016 12:15 PM

The railroad causeway that creates the color difference between the northern and sotuhern portions of the Great Lake is as the Union Pacific plans to change the causeway; the proposed bridge would allow for the two distinct salinities to intermingle more.  Environmentally, this lake is not exceptional.  Like many lakes in dry climates with growing populations, the people are using the freshwater flow into the lakes more extensively than they have in the past.  The Great Salt Lake, the Aral Sea, Lake Chad, Lake Urmia, and the Dead Sea are all drying up.  

Sally Egan's curator insight, April 10, 2016 11:05 PM
Another great example of human activities changing the biophysical environment.
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The World's Newest (Official) Ocean

The World's Newest (Official) Ocean | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"The Southern Ocean extends from the coast of Antarctica north to 60 degrees south latitude. The Southern Ocean is now the fourth largest of the world's five oceans (after the Pacific Ocean, Atlantic Ocean, and Indian Ocean, but larger than the Arctic Ocean). The International Hydrographic Organization (IHO) has  declared, named, and demarcated the Southern Ocean as a fifth, separate ocean."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 6, 10:37 AM

Typically we define oceans and seas based on their borders with land as their most important characteristics.  Also, we rarely look at the bottom of the globe as the center of our global perspective.  Those are a few of the reasons why American students usually have never heard of the Southern Ocean, but Australian students see it as one of the world's main oceans.  

 

TagsOceaniaAntarctica, water, environment, physical.

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Climate Migrants

Climate Migrants | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Climate change has already displaced tens of thousands of people. If it continues unabated, it could lead to one of the largest mass human migrations in history.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 18, 10:21 AM

This StoryMap shows some key regions where migrants are fleeing some of the negative impacts of climate change, a trend that appears very likely to increase in the future.  It is also an excellent example of the ESRI's new Cascade template for creating a web app. 

 

Tags: physical, weather and climate, climate change, environment, resources, watercoastalmappingESRIStoryMap, visualization, environment depend, political ecology.

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Skokomish River salmon cross the road

"Watch salmon race across the road on their way to spawn; for more footage, watch this extended version."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 16, 2016 9:57 AM

We often see examples of how human modifications to ecosystems or watersheds have devastatingly negative impacts.  This is a remarkable example from Washington's Olympic Peninsula that shows the resiliency of natural systems to overcome human modifications to the physical landscape.  If you study the world, you will always have something to both amaze and surprise you.   

 

Tagsfluvial, biogeography, environment, geomorphology, physicalwater, environment adapt, environment modify.

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, December 17, 2016 11:45 PM

Sometimes the natural world finds ways to adapt to human environmental changes. 

Useful when studying inland water / rivers for the option study. 

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Earth Science Memes

Earth Science Memes | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
This link is where you will find funny science pictures, jokes, current events and other miscellaneous things pertaining to science.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 6, 2016 10:37 AM

Because we all need a laugh sometimes...and if we can teach something at the same time, then even better.   

 

Tagsphysical, geomorphology, funart.

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What's the tallest mountain on Earth?

What's the tallest mountain on Earth? | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"Mount Everest is usually said to be the highest mountain on Earth. Reaching 29,035 feet at its summit, Everest is indeed the highest point above global mean sea level—the average level for the ocean surface from which elevations are measured. But the summit of Mt. Everest is not the farthest point from Earth’s center.

Earth is not a perfect sphere, but is a bit thicker at the Equator due to the centrifugal force created by the planet’s constant rotation. Because of this, the highest point above Earth’s center is the peak of Ecuador’s Mount Chimborazo, located just one degree south of the Equator where Earth’s bulge is greatest. The summit of Chimborazo is 20,564 feet above sea level. However, due to the Earth’s bulge, the summit of Chimborazo is over 6,560 feet farther from the center of the Earth than Everest’s peak. That makes Chimborazo the closest point on Earth to the stars.  

You may be surprised to learn that Everest is not the tallest mountain on Earth, either. That honor belongs to Mauna Kea, a volcano on the Big Island of Hawaii. Mauna Kea originates deep beneath the Pacific Ocean, and rises more than 32,800 feet from base to peak."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 25, 2016 6:42 PM

I've tried to answer this question without any visual aids and there is always at least one confused look in the class.  This infographic is the most straightforward way to give the 'long' answer to a seemingly simple question, "what is the tallest mountain on Earth?"  It all depends on how you measure it and what your reference point is.   

 

Tags: physicalEcuador, Nepal.

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The Tidal Waves of the Qiantang River

The Tidal Waves of the Qiantang River | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
For hundreds of years, on the eighth month of the lunar calendar, people have gathered along the shores of China’s Qiantang River at the head of Hangzhou Bay to witness the waves of its famous bore tide. Higher-than-normal high tides push into the harbor, funneling into the river, causing a broad wave that can reach up to 30 feet high. If the waves surge over the banks, spectators can be swept up, pushed along walkways or down embankments. Below, I’ve gathered images from the past few years of the Qiantang bore tides.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 21, 2016 8:09 PM

This is an amazing set of images, where a cultural phenomenon is wrapped up in observing the pulsating physical geography of the river.  Usually the tidal bore is impressive (but not dangerous--see video here), but occasionally it can be incredibly violent (see this 2015 video).   

 

Tags: physical, geomorphologywaterChina.

Kiran's comment, September 24, 2016 8:33 AM
http://onlinemoviesvideos.com/
Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, September 28, 2016 8:56 PM

Tital bores - the values of water 

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The Depths of the Unseen Ocean

The Depths of the Unseen Ocean | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"The depths below the ocean’s surface comprise a staggering 95 percent of the Earth’s living space, and much of it is unexplored by humans. To put into perspective just how deep the oceans go, this XKCD comic, (hi-res image).  Most of the ocean doesn’t even see sunlight. Even scientists aren’t familiar with everything that’s down there."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 30, 2016 1:50 PM

XKCD is a comic strip that deals with many intellectual issues, but it can also be a wealth of quality scientific information.  This infographic on the oceans is staggering.

 

Tags: XKCD, artinfographic, physical, environmentwater.

ROCAFORT's curator insight, September 1, 2016 3:24 AM
The Depths of the Unseen Ocean
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Surging Seas Interactive Map

Surging Seas Interactive Map | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Global warming has raised global sea level about 8" since 1880, and the rate of rise is accelerating. Rising seas dramatically increase the odds of damaging floods from storm surges.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 27, 2016 1:27 PM

This interactive map from Climate Central dramatically shows what locations are most vulnerable to sea level rise.  You can adjust the map to display anywhere from 1 to 10 feet of sea level rise to compare the impact to coastal communities.  This dynamic map lets to view other layers to contextualize potential sea level rise by toggling on layers that include, population density, ethnicity, income, property and social vulnerability.   

 

Tags: physical, weather and climate, climate change, environment, resources, watercoastalmapping, visualization, environment depend, political ecology.

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How Geospatial Analytics Are Changing Habitat Conservation

"The BirdReturns program is an effort to provide 'pop-up habitats' for some of the millions of shorebirds, such as sandpipers and plovers that migrate along the Pacific Flyway, a route that spans from Alaska to South America. Birds flying on this journey seek out the increasingly rare wetlands teeming with tasty insects to fuel their long-distance flights.  Over the last century, California's Central Valley has lost 95% of the wetlands habitat to development, agriculture, and other land use changes. As a solution, scientists use big data, binoculars, and rice paddies."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 17, 2016 4:35 PM

This project combines data from satellite imagery to map surface water in California's Central Valley, and individual bird observations to select locations that can be temporarily converted into wetlands to aid the migratory birds (for more information than the video provides about this project, read this article). 

 

This is a great example of using both 'big' geospatial data as represented by the satellite imagery and combining it with field data and actual observations to make the world a better place.  We need more decision makers that can think spatially and use geographic skills.  

 

Tags: physicalCalifornia, water, environmentbiogeography, remote sensing.

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India to 'divert rivers' to tackle drought

India to 'divert rivers' to tackle drought | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
India is to divert water from major rivers like the Brahmaputra and the Ganges to deal with severe drought, a senior minister tells the BBC.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 16, 2016 11:09 AM

The drought has been bad enough that (coupled with rising debt to seed companies) many farmers are committing suicide to escape the financial pain of this drought.   The monsoon rains can be lethal, but critical for the rural livelihoods of farmers and the food supply.

 

TagsIndia, agriculture, labor, agriculture, South Asia, physical, weather and climate.

 

 

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Animals Rule Chernobyl 30 Years After Nuclear Disaster

Animals Rule Chernobyl 30 Years After Nuclear Disaster | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Three decades later, it’s not certain how radiation is affecting wildlife—but it’s clear that animals abound.

 

It may seem strange that Chernobyl, an area known for the deadliest nuclear accident in history, could become a refuge for all kinds of animals—from moose, deer, beaver, and owls to more exotic species like brown bear, lynx, and wolves—but that is exactly what Shkvyria and some other scientists think has happened. Without people hunting them or ruining their habitat, the thinking goes, wildlife is thriving despite high radiation levels.

 

Tags: National Geographic, physical, biogeography, environment, ecology, environment modify, disasters.


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Thanks to Humans, the Great Salt Lake Is Drying Up

Thanks to Humans, the Great Salt Lake Is Drying Up | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Diverting more water could pose serious health and economic threats to Utah.

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Mary Grace Bunch's comment, April 21, 2016 10:21 PM
The Great Salt Lake in Utah is drying up which will lead to an unpromising future for the environmental health of the area. This is occurring due to the consistent reductions from rivers feeding into the lake that have been taking plays for 150 years. This past year the Great Salt Lake reached record low levels, dropping 11 feet. As a result of this increase in salinity and loss in half the volume of the lake, there is going to be trouble involving the economy and ecology of the state of Utah. This can be seen by dust storms or pollution.

The agglomeration of these rivers and gateways into the lake for human use are leading to the backwash effect. The backwash effect can be seen as the drained/dried out of water, an important resource to Salt Lake City, being drained in its regions. The impacts of the rivers outside of the lake are affecting the resources of the lake, even though it may not seem direct. Primary Economic Activities such as fishing will be impacted by the drying up of the Great Salt Lake. As a result of this, the development of Utah will be threatened. Utah is very reliant on the lake for it’s valuable resources that help them develop. A solution may be found through ecotourism. If the city is motivated in solving this problem, they could very well promote ecotourism in order to preserve the lake since Salt Lake City is very popular and many people travel there.

This article was relative to the Development Unit we are in now. It made me aware of what is going on in Utah. I never would have known this issue was occurring until I took the time to read it. I look forward to following along with this issue in the future and to see how the state of Utah will deal with it.
Kayla McIntosh's comment, June 1, 2016 11:14 PM
I agree with Mary Grace that they should use ecotourism to conserve the Great Salt Lake. Since the Great Salt lake is so economically important to Utah, ecotourism would help bring money into the state and make people more aware on what human use of rivers can to do the environment, which will eventually dry up the river that can cause dust storms, creating more air pollution.
Keone Sinnott-Suardana's curator insight, June 22, 2016 10:23 PM