AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO
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A Map of the World's Population Rendered As Mountains and Valleys

A Map of the World's Population Rendered As Mountains and Valleys | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
What if people were mapped like mountains?

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Nancy Watson's curator insight, March 24, 8:29 AM
Interesting look at the world population. It reinforces that populations are found near coasts or water. Good for Unit 1 & 2.
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Every Name Is a Music Reference

Every Name Is a Music Reference | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
The designers behind the “Alternative Love Blueprint” are back with a map of the world. Only this map uses song titles instead of place names.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 18, 2016 9:29 PM

As one friend said, I think we can forgive the poor projection choice because of the incredibly clever naming scheme of this map.  Very fun idea, and worth exploring. 

 

Tags: music, map.

Ruth Reynolds's curator insight, January 23, 3:41 AM
Lots of fun here and how long did this take to put together?

MartinVermaak's comment, January 23, 10:02 AM
https://hptechnicalsupportnumbe.quora.com/add
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Data from 130 million commuters reveal US ‘megaregions’ - News - Urban Studies and Planning - The University of Sheffield

Data from 130 million commuters reveal US ‘megaregions’ - News - Urban Studies and Planning - The University of Sheffield | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
From a former student. Thanks Gage! 

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Nancy Watson's curator insight, November 30, 2016 8:35 PM
Share your insight
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These Maps Show How Vast New Infrastructure Is Bringing the World Together

These Maps Show How Vast New Infrastructure Is Bringing the World Together | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"If you want to understand the world of tomorrow, why not just look at a good map? For my (Parag Khanna) new book, Connectography, I researched every single significant cross-border infrastructure project linking countries together on every continent. I worked with the world’s leading cartography labs to literally map out what the future actually — physically — will look like.

It turns out that what most defines the emerging world is not fragmentation of countries but integration within regions. The same world that appears to be falling apart is actually coming together in much more concrete ways than today’s political maps suggest. Major world regions are forging dense infrastructural connectivity and reorienting their relations around supply chains rather than borders."

 

Tags: regions, map.


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Canada is a huge country. Most of it is unfit for human habitation.

Canada is a huge country. Most of it is unfit for human habitation. | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"The area below the red line includes most of Nova Scotia, in Canada's east, but most of the population comes from the area a little farther west, in a sliver of Quebec and a densely populated stretch of Ontario near the Great Lakes."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 5, 2016 5:15 PM

Admitted, the web Mercator projection of this map distorts the far northern territories of Canada, but still it hammers home some fascinating truths about Canada's population distribution.  Land-wise, Canada one of the world's biggest countries, but population-wise, most of it is quite barren.  What geographic factors explain the population concentration and distribution in Canada?  

 

TagsCanada, map, North America, population, density.

Ivan Ius's curator insight, June 4, 2016 10:27 AM
This article highlights the geographic concept of Spatial Significance
Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, June 4, 2016 5:13 PM

Factors influencing settlement patterns - concentrations of population 

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This map should change the way you think about foreign aid

This map should change the way you think about foreign aid | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
As you can see, the biggest recipient by a long way is Israel (this is fiscal year 2014 data, but nothing's changing), and two other big ones are Egypt and Jordan, which both have aid packages that are tied up with their peace treaties with Israel. None of these are poor countries (indeed, Israel is downright rich), and the point of the money is to advance an American foreign policy agenda — not to help the poor. Pakistan and Afghanistan, which round out the top five, actually are pretty poor, but, again, the main American interest in them is clearly foreign policy rather than poverty.

 

Tags: political, geopolitics, development, economic.


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lpatteson's curator insight, March 23, 2016 1:01 PM
I wonder what this would look like if it were a map of the US's federal aid to the 50 states.
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The area of this map coloured red has the same population as the area coloured blue

The area of this map coloured red has the same population as the area coloured blue | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Well, this is kind of crazy. Only 5 per cent of the world's population lives in the regions of this map shaded blue. Another 5 per cent lives in the area shaded red. Yoinks.

 

Tags: population, density, South Asia.


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Carlos Fosca's curator insight, January 6, 2016 6:34 AM

Parece realmente una broma, pero la zona coloreada de rojo alberga a 350 millones de personas sobre una superficie que arroja una densidad poblacional de 1,062 habitantes por Km2. Si esto se compara con el país más densamente poblado de Europa, que es Holanda, con una densidad de 409 habitantes/Km2 o incluso con el departamento de Lima (269.1 habitantes /Km2) vemos que hay una gran diferencia. Pero el Perú también tiene propio su punto rojo en términos de densidad poblacional (no en términos de población absoluta). ¿Saben que lugar es este? Pues la provincia Constitucional del Callao que tiene una densidad poblacional de 7,159.83 habitantes/Km2 (2015).

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Half of Canada’s population

Half of Canada’s population | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"Half of Canada’s 33.5 million people live in the red part, the other in the yellow. More population divided maps (Source: reddit.com)"


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 2, 2015 3:58 PM

Land-wise, Canada one of the world's biggest countries, but population-wise, most of it is quite barren.  What geographic factors explain the population concentration and distribution in Canada?  


TagsCanada, map, North America.

JeanneSilvey's curator insight, November 17, 2015 10:09 AM

A great illustration of population concentration and high density in Urban centers. 4.6 million of the remaining 17 million (approx.) live in British Columbia.

 

Gene Gagne's curator insight, November 17, 2015 11:41 AM

First economically for trade routes you have the St. Lawrence river which was originally the most influential route for French explorers. You have Toronto the Canada's financial center which forms the core of the "Golden Horseshoe" region, which wraps around the western end of Lake Ontario, population wise a quarter of Canada's population lives here.  Politically it makes sense that government would be set up in that area because of the population in that area.  Which population leads to the social aspect because all activities of night life, restaurants, businesses, entertainment, malls, etc. are located in this area.  And lastly, it makes easy access for United States and Canada to exchange tourism and jobs and goods.

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World Religion Map

World Religion Map | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
The incredibly detailed map of the world's religions shows what the biggest religion is by census area in each country, along with its level of support.

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Madison Roth's curator insight, April 7, 12:47 PM
This map relates to my human geography class because it shows the distribution of religion, and that is something my class is learning about. I think the distribution of religion is interesting to view because of the enormous level of diversity. Comparing the spread from origins of different religions to one another, the size along with the support it receives are even more actions one would practice.
Chris Rouse's curator insight, April 11, 4:34 PM
This article is about the different religions around the world and what areas have the largest amount of supporters for a certain religion. This connects to our lessons because we learned about the different religions and where they are located.
Aaron Evans's curator insight, April 25, 9:27 PM
There are many religions throughout the world. And it is interesting to see where the religions are distributed throughout regions. Christian is the biggest religion in the world, I was surprised to see the tiny bits of christian in Asia. It is an overall very detailed map.
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Just making sure you were paying attention...


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 27, 2015 4:39 PM

Because it's funny; that's why. 

Scott Greer's curator insight, August 28, 2015 8:45 PM

All you need to know is that it is John Oliver....he's funny.

Gregory Stewart's curator insight, August 29, 2015 9:26 AM

This is a pretty funny clip.

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4 Maps Crucial to Understanding Europe's Population Shift

4 Maps Crucial to Understanding Europe's Population Shift | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Despite economic growth in Central and Eastern Europe, the continent is still migrating to the Northwest.

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Sally Egan's curator insight, November 23, 2015 6:42 PM

These contemporary maps help undetrstand the changing global population distribution.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 7, 2015 4:53 PM

The two maps that received my attention the most was 'No Work for the Young' and "Big City Drain.' It bothers me to read that the young population of European citizens is out of work, even the cities that do well. Stockholm, a well off country has a you unemployment rate of 30 percent, and Sheffield is 35 percent, that is huge! As for Big City Drain, although Europe's cities are growing, it is because of immigrants from other countries and migrants from that country moving to another part, just to find better work. Having immigrants does not help a particular countries population. Also the fact that since big cities are more expensive, people will leave the big cities such as London and Paris to find cheaper means of living. 

Raymond Dolloff's curator insight, December 15, 2015 1:01 AM

Population shifts are an important part of determining migrating trends of a population. Are they going to more urban areas? Are they going to suburban areas?  These maps can help understand the questions regarding where the higher population trends are and what countries are seeing a drop in their population to people moving to new places and creating new lives.

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Customizable Classroom Maps

Customizable Classroom Maps | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"The idea for creating dynamic online teaching maps came up after one of our teacher friends expressed her frustration over how difficult it was to find just the right learning map for particular topic."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 25, 2015 10:17 AM

One of the problems with so many outline maps for classroom use is that, depending on your lesson plan, you might want it labeled, showing surrounding countries or in color...but maybe not.  This site lets you customize these simple maps that are perfect for the K-12 classroom (and yes, they have maps for all regions of the world).  If you want online map quizzes for a regional geography course, these are my favorites.  Here is another good site for basic outline maps.       


Tags: K12, map, map archives

gelatinzoom's comment, June 26, 2015 6:58 AM
Good
Lindley Amarantos's curator insight, August 6, 2015 3:55 PM

One of the problems with so many outline maps for classroom use is that, depending on your lesson plan, you might want it labeled, showing surrounding countries or in color...but maybe not.  This site lets you customize these simple maps that are perfect for the K-12 classroom (and yes, they have maps for all regions of the world).  If you want online map quizzes for a regional geography course, these are my favorites.  Here is another good site for basic outline maps.       


Tags: K12, map, map archives. 

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Customizable Maps of Mexico

Customizable Maps of Mexico | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"Find worksheets about Geography of Mexico.  Hundreds of worksheets--millions of combinations."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 22, 2015 9:58 PM

One of the problems with so many outline maps for classroom use is that, depending on your lesson plan, you might want it labeled, showing surrounding countries or in color...but maybe not.  This site lets you customize these simple maps that are perfect for the K-12 classroom (and yes, they have maps for all regions of the world).  

Tags: Mexico, K12, map, map archives

MsPerry's curator insight, May 27, 2015 9:30 AM

Maps

Jacob McCullough's curator insight, May 27, 2015 10:06 AM

this is just a quick highlight of the geography of mexico in all its aspects 

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50% of the Canadian population lives in these counties

50% of the Canadian population lives in these counties | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"I was inspired by 50% of the U.S. lives in these counties. map. I was wondering what the equivalent map for Canada would look like. I couldn't find one, so I created my own."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 8, 2:11 PM

During the U.S. presidential election much was made about the differences between rural and urban regions of the United States.  Clearly the United States isn't the only North American country that has a highly clustered population distribution. 

 

Question to Ponder: How does this basic demographic reality impact Canadian politics, policies, infrastucture, culture, etc.?

 

TagsCanadamap, North America, population, density.

Ivan Ius's curator insight, March 23, 5:35 PM
Geographic Thinking Concepts: Spatial Significance, Patterns and Trends, Geographic Perspective
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Nine Nations of North America, 30 Years Later

Nine Nations of North America, 30 Years Later | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"Back in the ’70s, almost a hundred reporters around the country – Washington Post bureau chiefs, rovers, freelancers and me, their desk-bound editor – were trying to get our arms around how North America worked, really. Not how it should work. But how it did work. Forget those nice neat rectangles in the middle of the U.S. Let’s be real: The mountains of western Colorado are totally alien from the wheat fields of eastern Colorado. And Miami is part not of Florida, but its own watery Caribbean realm. And what a terrible idea is 'California.' It behaves as if it covers three warring civilizations. The result was my 1981 book, 'The Nine Nations of North America.' The reader reaction was astonishing. This map – drawn to anticipate the news – revealed something much deeper. It turned out to be a map of culture and values, which have nothing to do with our perversely drawn state and national boundaries."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 20, 2016 1:14 PM

Question to Ponder: How would you divide up North America?  What would be some differences from this map?  What reasons do you have for making these different regional groupings?  What are the main criteria for what constitutes a region?

 

Tags: regionsNorth America.

Tom Cockburn's curator insight, December 13, 2016 3:54 AM
Useful comparator to the megaregions map
Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, December 17, 2016 11:56 PM

An interesting look at settlement patterns in the USA if using this to compare with spatial patterns in Australia. A deeper examination will reveal reasons for differences in settlement patterns between the two nations. 

 

Syllabus

Students investigate differences in urban settlement patterns between Australia and another country, for example: 

  • examination of urban settlements to determine patterns of concentration 
  • explanation of factors influencing urban concentration eg climate and topography, transportation networks, land use or perceptions of liveability
  • assessment of the consequences of urban concentrations on the characteristics, liveability and sustainability of places

Geoworld 9 NSW

Chapter 7: Urban settlement patterns Australia and the USA

7.1 Population concentrated near coasts

7.2 Urbanisation of indigenous populations

7.3 Is Australia a nation of tribes?

7.4 Nature in control

7.5 Coastal colonial cities and ports

7.6 USA: Settlement, geography and history

7.7 Large cities: Contrasting patterns

7.8 Sprawling suburbs: similar patterns

7.9 Consequences of urban concentration 

Geothink Activities 3 and  4. 

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These Maps Show How Vast New Infrastructure Is Bringing the World Together

These Maps Show How Vast New Infrastructure Is Bringing the World Together | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"If you want to understand the world of tomorrow, why not just look at a good map? For my (Parag Khanna) new book, Connectography, I researched every single significant cross-border infrastructure project linking countries together on every continent. I worked with the world’s leading cartography labs to literally map out what the future actually — physically — will look like.

It turns out that what most defines the emerging world is not fragmentation of countries but integration within regions. The same world that appears to be falling apart is actually coming together in much more concrete ways than today’s political maps suggest. Major world regions are forging dense infrastructural connectivity and reorienting their relations around supply chains rather than borders."

 

Tags: regions, map.


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21 charts that explain how the US is changing

21 charts that explain how the US is changing | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
The US is a big, complicated place that has undergone some big changes over its 238 years, and even in the last few decades. Here are 21 charts that explain what life is like today in the US — who we are, where we live, how we work, how we have fun, and how we relate to each other.

 

Tags: USA, map, map archives. 


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Ms.Bright's curator insight, July 9, 2016 10:21 AM
Unit II
Michael Harding's curator insight, July 11, 2016 7:22 PM

A really challenging set of charts from the US. 


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xkcd: Map Projections

xkcd: Map Projections | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

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Mathijs Booden's curator insight, April 27, 2016 12:21 AM
Torn between Robinson and Hodo-Dyer.
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100 outstanding interactive maps of 2015

100 outstanding interactive maps of 2015 | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

Tags: K12, map, map archives.
It's time to present the most interesting interactive maps that came to our attention in 2015


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 4, 2016 12:58 PM

There is bound to be something that you will find useful/insightful in this year-end list part I and part II).

 

Tags: map, map archives.

Alex Smiga's curator insight, January 23, 2016 4:50 PM

Such a great collection of interactive and beautiful maps, hours of entertainment for the North American APHUG nerdus domesticus.

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Brilliant Maps

Brilliant Maps | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
The map above shows one of history's most astounding global shifts; the drop in fertility rate between 1970 and 2014.

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Paris Bloodshed May Be the Latest of Many ISIS Attacks Around the World

Paris Bloodshed May Be the Latest of Many ISIS Attacks Around the World | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
At least a dozen countries have had attacks since the Islamic State, or ISIS, began to pursue a global strategy in the summer of 2014.

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Chelsea Martines's curator insight, November 21, 2015 3:41 PM
The Paris attacks from ISIS are now being discovered as linked to other attacks that ISIS has planned out. They have up until now according to the article, done 'lone wolf' attacks and now are changing to bigger and city kind of attacks across the globe. They are taking over much of the Middle East and Africa, in hopes to make that area chaotic enough to start more global conflict and another world war, accoring to the article. There have been studies and research in tracking ISIS and they have found that attacks in many other cities in the world have been inspired by ISIS as well.
Matthew Richmond's curator insight, December 2, 2015 12:23 PM

These maps were very helpful in understanding the spread and threat of ISIS. It also helps the understanding of just what a wide range of places they have attacked is. They are capable of striking much of the world in the name of fundamentalism. However, the video of Muslim's chanting is one of those things that can kind of turn down the fear, especially of admitting refugees, that has gripped much of the world. We are as safe as we can be, but idea's are bulletproof and there's no end in sight to the elimination of Islamic Fundamentalism.

Lindley Amarantos's curator insight, December 4, 2015 10:55 AM

Read this article and fill out your Socratic seminar question sheet for the inner/outer circle on Tues, Dec 8

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My daughter can’t read a map. And your kid probably can’t either

My daughter can’t read a map. And your kid probably can’t either | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Ask any teenager for directions and he can pull up Google Maps quicker than you can recite an address. Pretty awesome, right? And I’ll be the first to admit that having a map in my phone that not only tells me where to turn but how long it will take me to get there is pretty amazing. I use it all the time, honestly. But even when I’m zoning out and listening to that soothing voice telling me where to turn, I have a mental picture in my head of her directions. And I never realized that my teenage daughter doesn’t have a map in her head, because she’s never really had to use one. Ever.

 

Tags: education, K12, geography education, spatial, mapping.


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Cade Johns's curator insight, August 16, 2015 9:26 PM

I think maps on your phone is great but what about if you get lost and you don't have service on your phone then what are you gonna do?Most young people have never had to read an actual map so most likely they won't be able to find their way back to civilization. CJ

Ethan Conner's curator insight, August 17, 2015 8:56 AM

Many people cannot read maps because of technolagy. This new form of maps are keeping children from the traditional way. Also keeping them from education.

Aaron Burnette's curator insight, August 26, 2015 9:50 AM

Although cell phone and technology is helpful, other people still believe in the prideful way. Reading paper maps.

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World Literacy Map: Literacy Rate Adult Total of People Ages 15 and Above

World Literacy Map: Literacy Rate Adult Total of People Ages 15 and Above | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Percentage of a country's population that can read and write. Country's define literacy age between 7 and 20 years old. The standard age for literacy most countries is 15 years of age.

 

Tags: education, K12, development, map, worldwide.


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Annenkov's curator insight, August 5, 2015 4:29 PM

My 10 year-old daughter was looking in our atlas a while back (yes, she is my daughter) and in the encyclopedic entry of each country she started noticing that literacy rates were included.  She started asking about which regions had higher and lower literacy rates. This became a teaching moment about the power of the map--I explained that all this data can be more easily accessed and seen on a map and this interactive map is what we discovered.  We need to help student find the maps and data to answer their questions (and we need to make sure that they are curious enough to ask questions about the way the world works).  

Lindley Amarantos's curator insight, August 6, 2015 3:53 PM

My 10 year-old daughter was looking in our atlas a while back (yes, she is my daughter) and in the encyclopedic entry of each country she started noticing that literacy rates were included.  She started asking about which regions had higher and lower literacy rates. This became a teaching moment about the power of the map--I explained that all this data can be more easily accessed and seen on a map and this interactive map is what we discovered.  We need to help student find the maps and data to answer their questions (and we need to make sure that they are curious enough to ask questions about the way the world works).  

geographynerd's curator insight, August 9, 2015 2:21 AM

My 10 year-old daughter was looking in our atlas a while back (yes, she is my daughter) and in the encyclopedic entry of each country she started noticing that literacy rates were included.  She started asking about which regions had higher and lower literacy rates. This became a teaching moment about the power of the map--I explained that all this data can be more easily accessed and seen on a map and this interactive map is what we discovered.  We need to help student find the maps and data to answer their questions (and we need to make sure that they are curious enough to ask questions about the way the world works).  

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Bad Maps Are Everywhere These Days. Here's How to Avoid Being Fooled

Bad Maps Are Everywhere These Days. Here's How to Avoid Being Fooled | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Tips from a geographer who's seen it all.

 

Tags:  mapping, cartography, 201, perspective, map.


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lackingingot's comment, June 30, 2015 2:58 AM
Excellent...!!
Kevin Barker's curator insight, June 30, 2015 10:35 AM

Excellent article with examples for exploring the ways in which maps can fail or mislead us.  This is particularly important considering how easily maps can be created by anyone through the availability of digital resources.

Angus Henderson's curator insight, July 2, 2015 2:04 AM

A mapping 'take-down' of great detail, with lots of of interesting linked examples

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49 Maps That Explain The USA For Dummies

49 Maps That Explain The USA For Dummies | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
The United States is mind-boggling. Right?!

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Matthew Richmond's curator insight, September 16, 2015 2:00 PM

Some of them are quite fascinating. Scooped from my professor.

Alex Vielman's curator insight, September 21, 2015 11:10 PM

It's to see these "maps" that "explain" the U.S. in almost a sarcastic matter. Americans are living in what researches call megaregions. After, doing our Map of the U.S. for an assignment, it becomes difficult to divide regions when one is so familiar with one area, in my case, New England. New England, or the Northeast, is considered a megaregion because there is high population density in this area. In the map that displays these megaregions, its interesting to see those areas that are emerging. For example, in the map it saids Cascadia is emegering which is the corner of the U.S., the state of Washington. 

Some people think that the U.S. population is spread throughout the whole map. Its interesting to actually realize that 47% of the U.S. has zero population. This was an awesome article thats loaded with fun interesting facts. 

Raymond Dolloff's curator insight, November 23, 2015 2:32 PM

Understanding the landscape of our Country is important. The way to best understand it is to look at maps, especially these maps, and get a hold on what the country looks like. From the height of exploration to seeing where the most trees are within the country. This map has a lot of information for anyone who has questions.