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AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO
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Placeness

Placeness | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
I understand placeness to mean everything that has to do with place, so this website is intended to be a sort of place encyclopedia. I hope that it will in due course provide an overview of the myriad ideas and experiences of place and places. Places are directly experienced aspects of the world and are full with diverse meanings, objects, and ongoing activities.

 

Tags: neighborhood, landscape, place. 


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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, July 10, 10:57 PM

Interesting reading

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Where in the World?

Where in the World? | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

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Fathie Kundie's curator insight, January 8, 10:03 AM

اختبار في الجغرافيا.. عبارة عن صور مأخوذة من الجو .. حاول التعرف على الدول والمدن

Brian Wilk's comment, January 31, 9:34 PM
This is Australia I think.
Henk Trimp's comment, February 1, 6:37 PM
It sure is!
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22+ International Borders Around The World

22+ International Borders Around The World | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
History (and sometimes, unfortunately, current events) shows us just how easily national borders can change, but we still like to think that they are permanent fixtures. These photos of different national borders around the world show you how both friendly and hostile nations like to fence off their turf.

 

Borders can make for some striking manifestations of power on the landscape.  On the other hand as seen in this picture of Slovakia, Austria and Hungary, friendship and cooperation can also be inscribed into the landscape.  There are some great teaching images in this gallery. 

 

Tags: border, political, territoriality, sovereignty,  images, land use, landscape.


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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, June 1, 9:38 AM

Unit 4

Level343's curator insight, June 1, 3:00 PM

Now that's cool!!

Dwane Burke's curator insight, June 3, 6:16 PM

What do these say about the world?

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This grand OTR experiment is about all of us

This grand OTR experiment is about all of us | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"Nowhere else in Cincinnati is contrast more evident than this one block of Republic Street. Rich and poor. Black and white. Dark past and vibrant future." 

 


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 29, 10:30 AM

The Over-The-Rhine neighborhood is very close to the APHG reading site, and the urban renewal here is quite controversial.  Many point to the economic positives and infusion of investments, while other see social displacement of the poor.  No matter your perspective, it is a place where there are very visible social boundaries

 

Tags: neighborhoodlandscape, gentrificationurban, place, culture, economicAPHG, Cincinnati

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Japan's Disappearing Villages

Japan's Disappearing Villages | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
In the small town of Nagoro, population 35, one woman is trying to save her village from extinction by creating life-sized dolls for every inhabitant who either dies or moves away.

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Edgar Manasseh Jr.'s curator insight, April 12, 3:53 PM

Okay very creepy but the woman trying to save her village from extinction due to  urban migration. It kind of reminds of me a Native American tribe in a similar fashion because it shows the power and history of the village and the connection it has with her. So by creating life sized dolls for the people who either died or moved away kind of creates a certain spirit of that person in whom stays behind with her, leaving the village the same, even if its actually not their physically but spiritually the tradition of their place still remains and the history would continue to live on very deep and interesting.

Bob Beaven's curator insight, April 16, 2:13 PM

I was both slightly creeped out by this article, as well as moved by it.  Urbanization has been increasingly going on in Japan.  In fact, when I think of the country, I think of the hustle and crowds of Tokyo.  Another factor playing into Japan's villages disappearing is that the birth rates in Japan are very low, in fact the country is losing population due to the fact that more people are dying than being born.  Viewing this town, it was pretty sad to see the dolls recreating scenes that living people once did in this town.  It is also eery because these dolls stay in the same position doing the same thing forever, it is kind of like a museum of what life was once like in a dying town.  It must be a hard thing to see happening to a place where one's family have lived for generations. 

 

Lora Tortolani's curator insight, April 20, 1:43 PM

Due to urban migration, this village of Nagoro is said to be one of 10,000 small towns that will disappear in Japan.  I've been to some small towns in Japan and can say there is so much more culture in these villages than there is in the big cities.  I got a totally different feeling in my sole than when I ended my trip in Tokyo.  While both parts of the country have its pros and cons, it is terrible to think that these villages will be defeated to the rise of urbanism.   

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Human Landscapes of Canada

Human Landscapes of Canada | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Canada is a massive country, yet it has one of the lowest population densities in the world. Despite this, Canadians have made a wide impact on their land, much of it visible from aerial and satellite photography. Hydroelectric facilities, roads, mines, farms, ports, resource exploration, logging, canals, cities, and towns have altered much of the landscape over the years.

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Bharat Employment's curator insight, February 23, 1:02 AM
http://www.bharatemployment.com/
Vincent Lahondère's curator insight, March 8, 11:20 AM

Un vrai plaisir

Michael Amberg's curator insight, May 26, 11:28 PM

This shows how even small populations can make a big impact on the world from the changes in urbanization.

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Incredible images capture dazzling symmetry of Iran's mosques

Incredible images capture dazzling symmetry of Iran's mosques | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"Self-taught Iranian photographer gains rare access to shoot religious buildings as they've never been seen.  It's a side of Iran the rest of the world doesn't normally get to see -- the kaleidoscopically brilliant interiors of the country's intricately designed mosques.With beautiful mosaics and stained glass framed by powerful architecture, the buildings are astounding."

 

Tags: religion, culture, Islam, Iran, Middle East.


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Molly McComb's curator insight, March 21, 4:25 PM

Showing the sacred spaces of Islam and how they are designed around the world. 

Lena Minassian's curator insight, March 22, 3:47 PM

This was one of my favorite articles. We usually are very used to seeing negative sides to the Middle East and this gave it a different spin. This shows breathtaking pictures of the Mosques in Iran. This architecture isn't like anything I've seen with all of the symmetry and colors. These photos were taken by a student and were not easily taken. You have to have an eye to capture moments like this and pictures like this are not always appreciated. the detail that went into creating and designing these mosques are really special and I would love to actually see something like this in person. 

Jared Medeiros's curator insight, March 29, 4:03 PM

Amazing photos of these mosques.  The detail and color in some of these mosques are extraordinary.  This kind of brilliance in color is something that is unexpected in this part of the world where everything seems to be so bland and alike in color or style.  Its surprising that the mosques don't let professional take pictures with certain equipment inside but let tourists take photos.  I would understand if the light from a camera could cause damage to the art, but these are the people who will be able to share these beautiful pictures with the rest of the world and show that there is more to Iran than what the outside may think.

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Where in the World?

Where in the World? | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

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Fathie Kundie's curator insight, January 8, 10:03 AM

اختبار في الجغرافيا.. عبارة عن صور مأخوذة من الجو .. حاول التعرف على الدول والمدن

Brian Wilk's comment, January 31, 9:34 PM
This is Australia I think.
Henk Trimp's comment, February 1, 6:37 PM
It sure is!
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Geographic Influences of Skating

"Dogtown and Z-Boys: A documentary about the pioneering 1970s Zephyr skating team."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 9, 2014 1:53 PM

Popular culture is shaped by taste-makers, counter-cultural movements, and the blending of cultural practices in new ways creating a distinct aesthetic. Often, the physical geography of a region plays a crucial role in shaping the cultural practices particular to their environment. All of that can be seen quite vividly in the colorful skating revolution of the 1970s that took shape in the Southern California. Kids who grew up idolizing surfers branched out their recreational habits into the modern form of skating that we see today at the X Games. Made legendary through a series of Skateboarder magazine articles, these kids shaped the cultural ethos of skateboarding for over a generation. With the coastal influence of surfing, the socioeconomics of a seaside slum, it’s abandoned piers, the ubiquity of cement and asphalt in the urban landscape, the run-down neighborhood of “Dogtown” was home to cultural movement. The fierce droughts of the 1970 meant abandoned swimming pools; that drought led surfers to the technological infrastructure for modern skating ramps and half pipes as they skated in emptied swimming pools. As stated in those Skaterboarder articles, “two hundred years of American technology has unwittingly created a massive cement playground of unlimited potential. But it was the minds of 11 year olds that could see that potential.” The documentary “Dogtown and Z-Boys” (trailer) and the fictionalized “Lords of Dogtown,” (trailer) both produced by skater turned filmmaker Stacy Peralta, chronicle the age (“Lords of Dogtown” is not appropriate for the K-12 classroom viewing).


Tags: place, spacesport, California, landscapevideo, popular culture, music.

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Fire and Weather

"This is what a pyrocumulus cloud caused by the burning of over 28,000+ acres of forest looked like as the sun set.  In person as these clouds were changing it wasn't all that noticeable when the huge plumes of smoke changed shape, but thanks to the magic of a time-lapse we get to behold the violent nature of the smoke cloud, including a storm cloud that emerged behind the main pyrocumulus."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 23, 2014 1:02 PM

Seeing this fire essential create it's own weather system is riveting.  While this scene can be seen as beautiful on the macro-scale, it is horrific on the ground where the fire ravaged physical and human landscapes alike.  Here is some satellite imagery of the fire. 

 

Tagsdisasters,  weather and climateCalifornia, landscape, time lapsevideo.

Diane Johnson's curator insight, September 24, 2014 7:10 PM

Great application of key factors involved in weather systems.

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GeoGuessr - Let's explore the world!

GeoGuessr - Let's explore the world! | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
GeoGuessr is a geography game which takes you on a journey around the world and challenges your ability to recognize your surroundings.

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Edelin Espino's curator insight, September 10, 2014 2:31 PM

This is a really cool game! You should play it.

Allison Henley's curator insight, September 10, 2014 2:35 PM

Very addicting even though I'm not that great at it!! haha

Matleena Laakso's curator insight, October 5, 2014 4:55 AM

Tämä on hauska, muutaman kerran on tullut "pelattua".

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Logging and Mudslides

Logging and Mudslides | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
In recent decades the state allowed logging — with restrictions — on the plateau above the Snohomish County hillside that collapsed in last weekend’s deadly mudslide.

Via Seth Dixon, Lilydale High School
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Geofreak's curator insight, April 3, 2014 1:39 PM

Mijnbouw en aardverschuivingen, een goede combinatie ...... 

PIRatE Lab's curator insight, April 7, 2014 11:48 AM

There are several reasons for mudslides--some are purely a result of physical geography and others are related to land use patterns.  This last week's mudslide in Washington state was a combination of the two and although this impacts one place (see on map), it is a good teaching moment to discuss the environmental impacts of land use patterns and resource extraction projects.  As seen in this interactive, the river was cutting at the base of the hill, while loggers were clear-cutting at the top of the mountain.  Trees help prevent erosion as the roots hold the soil in place--a critical piece to the puzzle in a very rainy climate.  With $1 million worth of timber on the slope, logging companies persisted despite objections from the Department of Natural Resources and some restrictions (but in hindsight, those restrictions clearly were not enough). 

 

View the impact in ArcGIS online: Before and After Swipe, LiDAR I and II, and Imagery.

 

Questions to Consider: Other than economic worth, what other ways are there to value and evaluate the environment?  How could this landscape have been protected and managed better or was this mudslide inevitable?   

El Futuro deWaukesha's curator insight, April 18, 2014 12:03 AM

Working on an Inquiry of recent natural disasters with first grader.  

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Places in their Proper Perspectives

Places in their Proper Perspectives | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"A fisherman's cottage is described by real estate agents as a 'property not to be missed' but it is also just yards away from two nuclear power stations."


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Adilson Camacho's curator insight, January 31, 2014 6:19 PM

Versões...

Fern Torres's curator insight, February 3, 2014 4:11 PM

Perception is everything!

Jess Deady's curator insight, April 16, 2014 1:35 PM

This house is 100% misleading. The paper advertised the first picture, which from the looks of it isn't so bad. Then when you get the reverse picture and see the nuclear power plants behind it, its a whole new scene! Whoever is trying to sell this house- good luck to you. Who wants to live next to something that could literally kill god knows what? Not me. 

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As South Carolina deals with its Confederate flag, one town in Brazil flies it with pride

As South Carolina deals with its Confederate flag, one town in Brazil flies it with pride | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
After the Civil War, members of the Confederacy fled to Brazil. Their ancestors still live in the region and continue to fly the Confederate flag.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 23, 3:35 PM

While people debate why the southern states actually seceded, there are many who still honor what they see as the gallantry of genteel southern society in the Southern Hemisphere.  It is important to note that Brazil was chosen as the home of this 'Confederacy in Exile' because it was the last western country to abolish slavery (1888 it ended there too).  Here is another article discussing the the Brazilian enclaves of 'Confederados,' or children of the unreconstructed South.   


Tags: Brazil, historicalthe Southlandscape.

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Dramatic Confluences

Dramatic Confluences | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"Confluences occur wherever two streams come together. If the gradient is low (i.e., nearly level) and the properties of the two streams are very different, the confluences may be characterized by a dramatic visible distinction as the mixing occurs only slowly."

 

Tags:  physical, fluvial, geomorphology, erosion, landscape.


Via Seth Dixon, Lilydale High School
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Sylvain Rotillon's curator insight, January 7, 5:47 AM

Wonderful pictures of rivers confluences

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22+ International Borders Around The World

22+ International Borders Around The World | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
History (and sometimes, unfortunately, current events) shows us just how easily national borders can change, but we still like to think that they are permanent fixtures.

Via Seth Dixon, Suvi Salo
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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, June 1, 9:38 AM

Unit 4

Level343's curator insight, June 1, 3:00 PM

Now that's cool!!

Dwane Burke's curator insight, June 3, 6:16 PM

What do these say about the world?

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One Place, Two Names

One Place, Two Names | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
The government of the People’s Republic of China calls the country’s westernmost region Xinjiang, but the people who have lived there for centuries refer to their home as Eastern Turkistan. Many times when two groups do not refer to a place by the same name, it points to a cultural or political conflict, as is the case here.

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Lydia Tsao's curator insight, May 26, 12:42 AM

I find it extremely disturbing that the Han Chinese are using means of violence and propaganda to suppress a group of people who are simply try to maintain their own way of living. Because of the powerful connections and dominance China has in the world, no country is standing up for the people of the area. This article just demonstrates how territoriality can be so hard to define, especially when there are numerous centrifugal forces that are driving the people of an area away from one another. While China believes that the area is theirs, the Uygurs do not identify with the predominant Han Chinese who live in China, so the Uygurs would like to form their own sovereign territory and area, free of the oppression of the Chinese government.

Caitlyn Christiansen's curator insight, May 26, 10:58 AM

In China, the westernmost region of Xinjiang, is called  Eastern Turkistan by the people who have lived there for centuries. Because of its geographic location, this area has a unique culture that is influenced heavily by central Asia but has little connection to China culturally. Recently, the region was found to be rich in resources and many Chinese moved there for economic gain, but in the process have made the indigenous people, the Uygur, the minority. Ethnic conflict followed and the Chinese government has taken action by enforcing laws and creating propaganda that portrays the Uygur as the enemy and restricts their rights and, specifically, their religious freedom.


This article relates to political organization of space by a boundary that connects a region to a country with which it shares few cultural ties. In the process, political conflict ensued and the area clearly demonstrates an issue to be resolved and a governments violation of rights.

Eden Eaves's curator insight, May 26, 5:59 PM

Unit 4

The government of the People’s Republic of China calls the country’s westernmost region Xinjiang, but the people who have lived there for centuries refer to their home as Eastern Turkistan. Many times when two groups do not refer to a place by the same name, it points to a cultural or political conflict, such as this. 

This territory is newer, being part of China since 1949, it was meant to be a buffer zone for the Han Chinese from their powerful neighbors.

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Over population, over consumption - in pictures

Over population, over consumption - in pictures | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"How do you raise awareness about population explosion? One group thought that the simplest way would be to show people in pictures the impact of population, pollution and consumption."


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SRA's curator insight, April 13, 2:43 PM

This is an article found on theguardian that talks about overpopulation in some regions, and overconsumption in others. There are very powerful pictures of various places around the world that really give you an idea about what is happening around the world. The one that gave me the chills is the picture of the dead bird that ingested too much plastic, thus killing it. Another powerful picture taken is the one of the surfer in Indonesia, surfing a wave of trash. 


-Jack Christensen


SRA's curator insight, April 14, 8:16 PM

Jordan Linhart


It is absolutely astounding to me how we are so continually growing and expanding as a human race. What's more astounding to me is how quickly we are depleting and wasting all of the resources we have been given. Don't get me wrong, I was aware there were 7 pushing 8 billion of us on the planet, but growing up in the suburbs I wasn't as aware of it as I could have been. Ignorance is bliss, right? It breaks my heart to see the clearing of beautiful forests, the once turquoise water of Haiti filled with trash, and the death of animals that accidentally stumbled upon our waste. If we as humans don't start taking care of our planet, there won't be any where left for us to over populate, or even populate for that matter.

Eden Eaves's curator insight, May 24, 7:56 PM

Unit 6

These eye opening photos paint a perfect picture of what the world will be like in years to come if we keep living the way we do. There are pictures of trash waves, extreme deforestation, hill-side slums, thousands of fields of oil wells, and overwhelming crowds of people.  

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1940s Urbanism

"This is a film by the Chicago Board Of Education, produced sometime in the 1940s. This film could have been geared towards tourism or to entice companies to come to Chicago or used in the classroom.  The great thing about this film reel, is all the different views of the city they give."

 

Tags: Chicago, urban, place, landscape,  video, urbanism.


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Bharat Employment's curator insight, February 1, 11:52 PM

www.bharatemployment.com

Lora Tortolani's curator insight, February 2, 7:04 PM

I love Chicago!  Such a beautiful and clean city.

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Why Do Rivers Curve?


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YEC Geo's curator insight, December 7, 2014 8:15 PM

Actually a very good video.  My one quibble is with the introduction, when the narrator talks about mountain streams "carving" their gorges.  The puzzle of how small streams could possibly carve out deep bedrock canyons is an ongoing research problem, and is difficult to resolve from a gradualistic perspective.

Jason Schneider's curator insight, January 27, 12:15 AM

So pretty much, the water controls rivers rather than particles controlling the river. Also, it appears that the motion and strength of the water causes rivers to bend and form in different curves. I'd like to think of it as a ball bouncing from side to side and every time it touches the border land of a river, it expands to the opposite side. However, when the water flow is hitting the side of a river, the opposite side is not getting any force from the water flow. In that case, the side that is not getting hit by the water flow slowly moves to the side that is being by the water flow causing river curves.

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, June 1, 2:07 AM

Australian curriculum


The geomorphic processes that produce landforms, including a case study of at least one landform (ACHGK050)


GeoWorld

Chapter 1: Distinctive landform features

Chapter 3: Restless Earth: geomorphic processes 

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Meandering Stream Time Lapse

The most viral images on the internet, curated in real time by a dedicated community through commenting, voting and sharing.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 13, 2014 2:06 PM

This is a fantastic way to visualize physical geographic processes. 


Tags physical, fluvial, geomorphology, erosion, landscape.

Jake Red Dorman's curator insight, November 25, 2014 1:24 PM

El Sire Reserve in Peru is a river that has been monitored over the last 28 years. Every time I watch this short 6 second clip, I learn something different about how this river has changed. On the bottom of the screen, just past half way, the river just takes a huge short cut and cuts over and connects to a different part of the same river. This happens on the whole river too. there are 8 or 9 huge bends and curves in the river but by the end in 2012 there are only about 3 to 4 bends and curves. For some reason the water is taking short cuts and just leaving the spaces where the water used to run through and leaving it dry.  

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Beautiful Physical Landscapes

"#TheRidge is the brand new film from Danny Macaskill... For the first time in one of his films Danny climbs aboard a mountain bike and returns to his native home of the Isle of Skye in Scotland to take on a death-defying ride along the notorious Cuillin Ridgeline."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 3, 2014 3:41 PM

I loved Danny Macaskill's earlier video in Scotland's cultural landscapes, and this extreme sports clip is infused with gorgeous physical landscapes.  


Tag: Scotland, sport, landscape.

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, October 6, 2014 5:37 AM

Beautiful Physical Landscapes

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, October 19, 2014 7:37 PM

Engage boys with Landforms and Landscapes - intro video!

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The Transformation of Burning Man

The Transformation of Burning Man | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"Burning Man takes place at the end of August every year in the barren and remote Black Rock Desert of Nevada. The weeklong festival is described by its organization as “an experiment in community, art, radical self-expression, and radical self-reliance.” Earth-bound photographers have chronicled the legacy of art, technology, design, and fashion at the event over the years, but we at Skybox wanted to know if we could capture the transformation of the city from space, with our constellation of SkySats. This is the result:

A full-fledged city of population 70,000, “Black Rock City” is built up in a matter of days, experienced for a single week, and disassembled just as quickly, leaving no trace."


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CT Blake's curator insight, September 19, 2014 12:45 PM

An interesting view of the passage of short amounts of time and human interaction in a transitory urban scene-- Burning Man.

Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, September 21, 2014 10:12 PM

I have a friend from Nevada and he explained how excited he was to go to Burning Man and he was almost appalled when I asked what the big deal was.  I had no idea that this huge event is put up and taken down in such a short period of time, all that quick work for a weeks worth of entertainment.  The idea to document the construction and destruction through satellite was an excellent idea, as it is more meaningful to someone than writing that it was constructed in so many days and taken down in this many.  

Alec Castagno's curator insight, September 23, 2014 11:39 AM

Burning Man is a massive and creative counterculture festival, and its surprising to learn that the majority of the camps are created by participants of the festival in whatever manner they choose. It is amazing that such a huge number of people can flock to such a remote location and in a very short amount of time build a complex, organized settlement, all for the purpose of a festival dedicated to independence and expression. What is popularly seen as a drugged out Mecca for the weird is carried out in a shockingly complex manner, and by working with the local infrastructure and providing one of their own the festival is able to be carried out year after year.

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Alluvial Fans

Alluvial Fans | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
When streams emerge from mountains, they often spread out and deposit sediment in a distinctive pattern known as an alluvial fan.

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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, May 23, 2014 11:29 PM

Inland water year 10 , River landscapes year 8 

Shanelle Zaino's curator insight, October 22, 2014 2:10 PM

Interesting to see the correlation between waterways and population.It is very important to pick a place to live that you will be able to not only thrive but survive. Being cognizant of where flood planes are located as well as growing areas is  also very important.

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 12, 2014 4:16 PM

Alluvian fans are the life source of places like Kazakhstan that are incredibly arid. Alluvial fans are fan like land features found off of mountains. Melting in the mountains causes the water to take the path of least resistance downhill, resulting in a narrow river running down the mountainside. As it hits more level land, the water spreads out into multiple streams and tributaries. The much needed water and rich soil provide for agriculture to develop in these desert regions. Populations develop around these areas, since everywhere else is too harsh for food production and cannot support large populations. 

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Countries Divided on Future of Ancient Buddhas

Countries Divided on Future of Ancient Buddhas | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Thirteen years after the Bamian Buddhas were blasted into rubble, opinion is split on whether to leave them as is, rebuild them, or make copies of them.

Via Seth Dixon
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Edelin Espino's curator insight, December 15, 2014 5:27 PM

Camels are such a work-shipping animals, their support hundreds of weight from the people also take gallons of waters. If I ever visit Egypt I will make sure to ride one. Although, those are donkeys. Anyway good news, in my opinion it shouldn't be rebuilt. Leave history as it is. 

Bob Beaven's curator insight, March 19, 12:46 PM

Most people often forget that the Silk Road passed into Central Asia and the Middle East from East Asia.  This means that along the road, travelers often put things that reminded them of home.  The Buddha statues that once existed in Afghanistan are an example of this.  They were in fact labeled a world heritage site.  Sadly, the Buddhas had been ravaged throughout history by radical arabs.  This is because their religion frowns upon (actually forbids) idols, which they considered the statues to be.  Although they had been tempered with for many years, the Taliban finally decided to blow them up in 2001.  Now, there are differing opinions across various countries as to whether they should be rebuild or not.  Afghanistan believes that they should be rebuilt so the government can claim a symbolic victory over the Taliban.  Unesco wants a restoration done right, so for now it won't allow rebuilding to occur.  Germans tried to rebuild them, but Unesco blocked it from happening.  South Korea, Italy and Japan are all willing to donate money, but have no mention of the statues.  I believe that the statues should be rebuilt, as the article points out monuments were rebuilt in France after Protestants burnt down many old Gothic Cathedrals.  I also believe it is necessary because we cannot let the culture of hate that the Taliban believes in to win.  Average Muslims realize that the statues have historical significance and that they do not need to worship Buddha to respect that this site was 1,500 years old.  I also think it would send a strong message from the Afghan government if the statues were rebuilt because it would show they, like the article states, are not going to let the Taliban rule their country.

 

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, April 7, 9:42 PM

I find it interesting that other countries are divided.  Why are they deciding the future for this country?  They can't seem to get out of their ways to come up with a real solution.  Its unfortunate.