AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO
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The Whale's Tail

The Whale's Tail | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"The Ballena Marine National Park is located in Puntarenas, at the South Pacific coast of Costa Rica." 


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 6, 2016 3:33 PM

This National Park in Costa Rica is a delightful example of many things geographic.  Not only is the local biogeography make this a place famous for whales (ballena in Spanish), but the physical geography also resembles a whale's tail.  This feature is called a tombolo, where a spit connects an island or rock cluster to the mainland. Additionally, there is also a great community of citizen cartographers mapping out this park and the surrounding communities. 

 

Tagsbiogeography, environment, geomorphology, physicalwater, landforms.

Alexander peters's curator insight, October 24, 2016 12:23 PM
This article was about the whale and how they were repopulating and how the whale hunting was banned in the 70s. I think this article was really good because use it talked about whales.
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The Ultimate Canadian Geography Quiz

The Ultimate Canadian Geography Quiz | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"From treasure maps to smart phone apps, geography makes sense of our world by describing locations, patterns and relationships of the Earth’s natural and social systems — both past and present. Canadian Geographic’s editors, along with the help of a number of Fellows of The Royal Canadian Geographical Society and other experts, compiled this ultimate Canadian geography quiz to truly test you. Think you’re a geo genius? Prove it!"


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 10, 2015 5:40 PM

These are 50 HARD questions (any student not from Canada that gets over 50% right should pat themselves on the back).  I will only give you one of the 50 answers since most of you have never been to the explore the frozen tunda; pictured above is a pingo.  Pingos form when groundwater is pressurized and forced upward in a concentrated area by advancing permafrost. This groundwater-saturated sediment freezes and expands as it’s driven toward the surface, causing the earth above to bulge and eventually break open. 

 

TagsCanada, trivia, games, Arctic, landforms.

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Tide Makes Tombolo an Island

Tide Makes Tombolo an Island | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
The historic abbey of Mont Saint-Michel became an island on March 21 after a rare “supertide” flooded a causeway.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 25, 2015 11:23 AM

Coastal physical geography produces some beautiful landforms such as tombolos.  A tombolo is created when sand deposits attach an island to a larger piece of land--think of it as special type of isthmus.  Mont St. Michel (picture above) is the world’s most famous example because of the iconic walled city with crowned with a striking medieval abbey.  As the tides fluctuated, the city and abbey were alternately connected or disconnected from the mainland.  However, a ‘super-tide’ that occurs once every 18.6 years wiped out the artificial causeway stranding motorists on France's most visited tourist destination (I wouldn't mind be stranded there right about now).  


Tags: water, physical, coastal, geomorphology, landformsFrance, tourism.

West Sound Tech Assn's curator insight, March 25, 2015 8:32 PM

Not techy but very cool!

Jacob McCullough's curator insight, May 26, 2015 5:24 PM

this was interesting mother nature shows us once again that she is in control by showing us how easily our seemingly strong structures can be swept away    

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Simulation of the Oso Landslide

Simulation of the Oso Landslide | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"The large landslide that occurred in March near Oso, Washington was unusually mobile and destructive."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 13, 2015 1:53 PM

There are several reasons for landslides--some are purely a result of physical geography and others are related to land use patterns.  The landslide in Washington state last year was a combination of the two (see on map) and it is a good teaching moment to discuss the environmental impacts of land use patterns and resource extraction projects.  As seen in this interactive, the river was cutting at the base of the hill, while loggers were clear-cutting at the top of the mountain.  Trees help prevent erosion as the roots hold the soil in place--a critical piece to the puzzle in a very rainy climate.  With $1 million worth of timber on the slope, logging companies persisted despite objections from the Department of Natural Resources and some restrictions (but in hindsight, those restrictions clearly were not enough).  Watch a simulation of the landslide here.  

View the impact in ArcGIS online: Before and After Swipe, LiDAR I and II, and Imagery.


Questions to Consider: Other than economic worth, what other ways are there to value and evaluate the environment?  How could this landscape have been protected and managed better or was this landslide inevitable?   


Tagspolitical ecology, resources, environment, environment modify, industry, physical, geomorphology, erosion, landforms.

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, January 27, 2015 4:50 PM

This seems like a useful tool to a degree.  But if we could actually simulate every destructive event then we would be miracle workers.  This was a sad event.  We have left such an imprint on the earth that it's starting to fight back.  We need to be more aware and careful with the one planet we have.  Climate changes are in the news more and more.  We can't ignore climate changes anymore.  

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Eerie Landforms

Eerie Landforms | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

Utah's Fantasy Canyon features mudstone eroded into bizarre shapes. This one's called "Flying Witch". #Halloween

 

Tags: physical, geomorphology, erosion, landforms, Utah.


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Angels Landing

"Since 2004, six people have died falling from the cliffs on this route." is what the sign says. Only one step from a 1400 foot fall.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 24, 2014 9:10 AM

Angel's Landing in Utah's Zion National Park (map) is one of my favorite hikes with an amazing view.The geomorphology of 'red rock' country is stunning and it's sheer cliffs are bound to captivate the imagination.  If you want something like this but with a more European flavor, watch National Geographic's Andrew Evans climb Preikestolen in Norway.   


Tags: physical, geomorphology, erosion, landforms, Utah.

Utah Geographical Alliance's curator insight, March 25, 2014 7:22 PM

Thank you @APHumanGeog beautiful video of #Utah to remind us it is spring! Get your students outside and enjoy our beautiful home, teaching students outside can be very rewarding in teaching them about the world we live in.  

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Heart-shaped landscapes

Heart-shaped landscapes | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

The top image is a mangrove forest in New Caledonia, Glaslyn (Blue lake) in Northern Wales and a cave in the 4 corners region of the United States. 


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Estelblau's comment, February 14, 2014 4:03 PM
Really great ;)!
Estelblau's comment, February 14, 2014 4:03 PM
Really great ;)!
Pasquale Abiuso's curator insight, February 17, 2014 5:23 AM

Storie di natura.

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LOTS OF MAPS! Earth Science Week

LOTS OF MAPS! Earth Science Week | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

Take part in Earth Science Week 2013! Held October 13-19, ESW 2013 will promote awareness of the many exciting uses of maps and mapping technologies in the geosciences. “Mapping Our World,” the theme of ESW 2013, engages young people and the public in learning how geoscientists, geographers, and other mapping professionals use maps to represent land formations, natural resource deposits, bodies of water, fault lines, volcanic activity, weather patterns, travel routes, parks, businesses, population distribution, our shared geologic heritage, and more. Maps help show how the Earth systems – geosphere, hydrosphere, atmosphere, and biosphere – interact.


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Malini Mehan's curator insight, October 6, 2013 10:49 AM

Earth Science week unleashes the mechanism to understand the  dynamic world. It is a great way to observe and understand the constanly evolving processes that bring about changes in the physical and social landscape. From the evolution of islands off the coast of southern Pakistan, as was reported after the deadly earthquake of 24th September to freak weather and migration of illegal immigrants from Europe to Africa, understanding mapping techniques would give valuable insight into the interaction of the Earth Systems.

Elaine Watkins's curator insight, October 11, 2013 2:35 AM

Some awesome activity ideas and unit plans on this site for teachers to do with Earth Science!

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, October 30, 2013 3:58 PM

Bacana! 

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Yosemite’s Iconic El Capitan Mapped in High-Resolution 3D

Yosemite’s Iconic El Capitan Mapped in High-Resolution 3D | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
New geologic map helps scientists understand ancient volcano’s roots and contemporary rock falls.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 13, 2013 8:06 AM

On a personal note, my very first globe and National Geographic magazines were given to me by my grandparents who noticed I had an affinity for all things geographic.  They lived just outside Yosemite Park and they made sure I explored it frequently while I was growing up so I have a soft spot for this particular national park.  My grandmother informed me that El Capitan was the largest single piece of granite on Earth and my skeptical 3rd grade mind replied, "Is that a fact or an opinion?"  Informal geographic education had a greater impact on my educational path than the formal K-12 curriculum.  Without those simple nudges, I doubt I would be a geographer today.  


Tags: Californiaphysical, geomorphology, erosion, landforms.

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Canyons

Canyons | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"A canyon is a deep, narrow valley with steep sides."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 2, 2013 12:45 PM

This encyclopedic entry is a concise explanation of the environmental forces that create canyons. 


Tags: water, physical, geomorphology, landforms, National Geographic.

Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, December 6, 2013 11:45 AM

Canyons are really cool to look at, but they also tell stories.  The various layers of rock can be dated based on crystal structures and possible organic content in sediment, and the eroded sides can be traced back to wind, or in some areas, water-based erosion patterns.  I think that shows that one does not just have to look at the rocks, but one can use their imagination to view history, and even infinite time by considering that the canyons are transient and shifting messages that are carved into rocks by the world, and the universe.  I think that where the article said people have relied on and depended on canyons, it brings to the surface more illumination of the immense convenience of humans having everything they need to survive- just on this one planet...  Food, clothes, shelter, can be created by what is around us.  It is like we were put here with resources- it sorta feels like some of the Sim games.  I do believe aliens are responsible for putting what is now known as the human species on this planet, and I do believe in the abstract yet artificial terraformation of Earth by aliens.  Canyons erode, and die away, as do humans.  I can't help but believe that they are messages from the natural universe, along with the material resource provisions that have been so widely abundant for humans on this planet.

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Akimiski Island, Canada

Akimiski Island, Canada | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Scraped clean and weighted down for thousands of years by Pleistocene ice sheets, Akimiski Island in James Bay provides a case study of how Earth's land surfaces evolve following glaciation.

 

Tags: remote sensing, geospatial,Canada.


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Nathan Chasse's curator insight, January 25, 2014 10:18 AM

This image tells the story of Akimiski Island's recovery after the last Ice Age, when it was covered with glaciers so large they sunk the island. The layered scarring on highlighted in the lower image was caused by waves as the island rebounded and rose along with the rising oceans as glaciers melted.

 

I wonder what forces are at work to raise the elevation of the island, possibly just decompression from the millions of pounds of pressure the island was under during the Ice Age.

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2 Cars Swallowed By Sinkhole

2 Cars Swallowed By Sinkhole | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
A 150-yard-long chunk of State Highway 89 collapsed about 5 a.m. roughly 25 miles south of Page

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Louis Culotta's comment, February 21, 2013 2:49 PM
it looks like some of the pictures of the roads I took after the earthquake in new Zealand .
megan b clement's comment, December 16, 2013 12:28 AM
A 150 yard piece of highway 89 had collapsed at 5 am. Two cars were traveling on the highway at the time. They have called scientists and geologists to the site where it happened so they can explain exactly what happened. The video is crazy of the road collapsed it literally dropped about six+ feet.
Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, December 17, 2013 3:14 PM

I am curious to see what the geologists reasoning for this to happen.  when I drive I assuming the roads I take are safe but this goes to show you you never know what will happen. And the news reporter said it was still going down. Glad everyone involved made it out safe. 

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Remote Sensing Images

Remote Sensing Images | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
It's already unlikely we'll get a view as good as the ones collected in "Earth As Art,"

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 15, 2012 12:41 PM

This article and the selected gallery is based on the free e-book "Earth as Art" which I've mentioned here before earlier.  This particular image is fantastic for teaching about geomorphology and river systems.  Students can 'see' the historical layers of a meandering stream winding it's way across the landscape.  Connecting the physical geography to human geography, analyzing the flood plains can help explain the land use and settlement patterns in this Mississippi Delta image.   

UPDATE: Here's another meandering stream image (Willamette River, Oregon) that shows the dynamism of fluvial processes quite nicely.

Steven Sutantro's curator insight, December 20, 2012 8:56 PM

the beauty of our earth...

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Arctic Trivia Quiz

Arctic Trivia Quiz | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"From icebergs and Inuit legends to polar bear organs and exploration disasters, 50 questions to truly test your northern knowledge."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 11, 2015 4:03 PM

These are 50 HARD questions (any student not from Canada that gets over 50% right should pat themselves on the back). 

 

TagsCanada, trivia, games, Arctic, landforms.

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Lakes On A Glacier

"How deep is that icy blue water on Greenland's ice sheet? Dr. Allen Pope, of the National Snow and Ice Data Center, is using data from the NASA/USGS Landsat 8 satellite to find out. In this video, Dr. Pope shares what he sees when he looks at a Landsat image of the Greenland ice sheet just south of the Jakobshavn Glacier.

Because the lakes are darker than the ice around them, they absorb more energy from the sun. A little bit of melt concentrates in one place, and then melts more, establishing a feedback mechanism accelerating the growth of the lake. When the lakes get big enough they can force open fractures that then drill all the way down to the bed of the glacier, transporting this water to the base where it can temporarily speed up the flow of the ice."


Tags: physical, geomorphology, landforms, erosion, climate change, Greenland, remote sensing, geospatial.


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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, September 8, 2015 1:06 PM

unit 1 and summer read

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Augmented Reality Sandbox

"Realtime topographic contour line generation."


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Bobbi Dunham's curator insight, March 8, 2015 10:08 AM

Well, that is just incredible. Now THAT'S a sandbox! Augmented Reality is going to be a major gamechanger.

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, April 5, 2015 9:20 PM

Every Geography classroom needs one of these to explain topography

Paul Farias's curator insight, April 9, 2015 12:24 PM

This thing is sick! I would love to make one of these i would play with this thing for hours and I'm an adult. And they say video games are useless, the kinect can be used for things other than dance offs and such. 

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Simulation of the Oso Landslide

Simulation of the Oso Landslide | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"The large landslide that occurred in March near Oso, Washington was unusually mobile and destructive."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 13, 2015 1:53 PM

There are several reasons for landslides--some are purely a result of physical geography and others are related to land use patterns.  The landslide in Washington state last year was a combination of the two (see on map) and it is a good teaching moment to discuss the environmental impacts of land use patterns and resource extraction projects.  As seen in this interactive, the river was cutting at the base of the hill, while loggers were clear-cutting at the top of the mountain.  Trees help prevent erosion as the roots hold the soil in place--a critical piece to the puzzle in a very rainy climate.  With $1 million worth of timber on the slope, logging companies persisted despite objections from the Department of Natural Resources and some restrictions (but in hindsight, those restrictions clearly were not enough).  Watch a simulation of the landslide here.  

View the impact in ArcGIS online: Before and After Swipe, LiDAR I and II, and Imagery.


Questions to Consider: Other than economic worth, what other ways are there to value and evaluate the environment?  How could this landscape have been protected and managed better or was this landslide inevitable?   


Tagspolitical ecology, resources, environment, environment modify, industry, physical, geomorphology, erosion, landforms.

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, January 27, 2015 4:50 PM

This seems like a useful tool to a degree.  But if we could actually simulate every destructive event then we would be miracle workers.  This was a sad event.  We have left such an imprint on the earth that it's starting to fight back.  We need to be more aware and careful with the one planet we have.  Climate changes are in the news more and more.  We can't ignore climate changes anymore.  

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Logging and Mudslides

Logging and Mudslides | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
In recent decades the state allowed logging — with restrictions — on the plateau above the Snohomish County hillside that collapsed in last weekend’s deadly mudslide.

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Geofreak's curator insight, April 3, 2014 1:39 PM

Mijnbouw en aardverschuivingen, een goede combinatie ...... 

PIRatE Lab's curator insight, April 7, 2014 11:48 AM

There are several reasons for mudslides--some are purely a result of physical geography and others are related to land use patterns.  This last week's mudslide in Washington state was a combination of the two and although this impacts one place (see on map), it is a good teaching moment to discuss the environmental impacts of land use patterns and resource extraction projects.  As seen in this interactive, the river was cutting at the base of the hill, while loggers were clear-cutting at the top of the mountain.  Trees help prevent erosion as the roots hold the soil in place--a critical piece to the puzzle in a very rainy climate.  With $1 million worth of timber on the slope, logging companies persisted despite objections from the Department of Natural Resources and some restrictions (but in hindsight, those restrictions clearly were not enough). 

 

View the impact in ArcGIS online: Before and After Swipe, LiDAR I and II, and Imagery.

 

Questions to Consider: Other than economic worth, what other ways are there to value and evaluate the environment?  How could this landscape have been protected and managed better or was this mudslide inevitable?   

El Futuro deWaukesha's curator insight, April 18, 2014 12:03 AM

Working on an Inquiry of recent natural disasters with first grader.  

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Rivers from Above

Rivers from Above | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Get a unique view of these rivers beyond the banks.Photo editing by Lia Pepe

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Woodstock School's curator insight, February 25, 2014 5:01 AM

The Art of Geography

Mark Burgess's curator insight, February 26, 2014 6:26 AM

Awesome rivers. i love a good river.

ok's curator insight, September 23, 2014 5:45 AM

esrdcfvtgbhyjnkmstgyb weiweeee

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Submarine Canyons

Submarine Canyons | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"Submarine canyons were identified by the pre-SONAR mappers, but it wasn’t until this technological advancement that we realized how common a feature they are. We now know that there are hundreds (perhaps thousands depending on your definition) of submarine canyons incising into continental shelves and slopes all over Earth."

 

Tags: physical, environment, water, geomorphology, erosion, landforms.


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Tony Aguilar's curator insight, October 13, 2013 2:56 AM

submarine canyons are a natural underwater phenomenon with no clear explainable cause. They are located in parts of the world sush as New Zealand and off the coast of Santa Monica california. These canyons at the bottom of the ocean may have been ancient rivers from before prehistoric times, and the erosion and subduction of the tectonic plates over millions of years leave the remains of channels of rivers from the past. Another theory is that they are caused by water forces that caused the sea bed to erode and make way for an actuall canyon. With the use of Sonar technology we are still discovering phenomons of the submarine world as sciene progresses. These canyons are common and are found all over the Earth and give is an understanding of what the world may have looked like long ago.

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Esri Thematic Atlas

Esri Thematic Atlas | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
The Esri Thematic Atlas is a configurable web application that uses a collection of intelligent web maps with text, graphics, and images to talk about our world.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 21, 2013 5:04 PM

ESRI is moving towards creating a dynamic, authorative, living digital atlas and empowering users to create their own.  See this great political map of 2008 U.S. presidential election that is a part of the altas; it goes far beyond simple blue and red states.  StoryMaps are also democratizing the mapping process.  Explore these excellent examples of storymaps (Endangered Languages and top 10 physical landforms). 


Tags: GIS, ESRI, mapping, cartography, geospatial, edtech.

JMSS_Geography Resources's curator insight, June 26, 2013 1:20 AM

The Esri Thematic Atlas is a configurable web application that uses a collection of intelligent web maps with text, graphics, and images to talk about our world.

Carol Thomson's curator insight, July 17, 2013 4:53 AM

First unit is based on maps and atlases.  Want to build a range of resources.

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Erosion in Action

News 8 chief photojournalist Kevyn Fowler captured a road collapsing in Freeport, Maine during a storm.

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Francisco Javier 's curator insight, May 12, 2013 8:53 PM

Erosion in Action | @scoopit via @APHumanGeog http://sco.lt/...

Shelby Porter's curator insight, December 11, 2013 10:23 PM

Normally we see erosion on a piece of land over a long period of time. In this short video, we see what erosion can do to in mere minutes. It is scary to think how much the roads we drive on are eroding right underneath our cars. It is amazing how much the environment around us can change due to the weather. 

megan b clement's comment, December 16, 2013 12:30 AM
This video is crazy! It shows the erosion of a road during a storm. The water was supposed to run under the road and flow through a large pipe. As you can see after watching the video the road eventually erodes and then the pipe begins to bouy up and down. Later the road is completely deteriorated and the pipe ran down the river with the rest of the road.
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Augmented Reality Sandbox

Video of a sandbox equipped with a Kinect 3D camera and a projector to project a real-time colored topographic map with contour lines onto the sand surface. ...

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Tibshirani's curator insight, March 12, 2013 2:07 PM

very cool!

David Ricci's comment, April 22, 2013 3:40 PM
I actually watched this video the first time we went to the computer lab in gauge just because it caught my eye. I think that this is a cool way to show different landforms and how some of the ecosystems processes work with and around them. I feel that this video encompasses geography as a whole. Seeing the way that the water falls around the mountain made in the video and where it ends up pooling is a good example of natural geography. When looking at the area the lake is now centered a viewer can see where a potential colony or group of people may live in this are. This all depends on closeness to resources such as water, arable land, and potential food supplies. All of this depends on the physical occurrences that you can see in this video. This video also helps to tie in the lesson in class about geomorphology. The creation of dremmels by glaciers, runoff from the mountains, and plate tectonics. These topics can be taught through a power point, but it really helps to see all of this created and the process it takes.
Brianna Simao's comment, April 30, 2013 10:28 PM
This is a cool way to show the different landforms and the potential use of the surrounding area. It shows us where people could migrate to and start a community and the resources it may have. It also shows the geomorphology of how the landforms were made. I agree with David when he says that these topics can be taught through a power point but to get a real understanding of how they are created and the process it takes, this is the best way to learn.
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Maps and the Geospatial Revolution

Maps and the Geospatial Revolution | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"Learn how advances in geospatial technology and analytical methods have changed how we do everything, and discover how to make maps and analyze geographic patterns using the latest tools."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 21, 2013 1:35 PM

When I was a graduate student at Penn State, I was introduced to some great people and programs and I'm glad to see that the institution has continued to excel and be a leader.  You have probably heard of MOOCs (Massive Open Online Course) and been interested in seeing how this might change higher education in the future.  This MOOC is a free 5-week course designed to be an introduction to mapping, GIS and geospatial technologies so you don't need to be a specialists with a mapping background: it's for beginners.  I know that many geography teachers tell their students about GIS, but are afraid to teach with GIS because they are worried that it will be too hard.  This is an easy on-ramp to 21st century geospatial tools and any geography teacher hoping to modernize their skillset would do well to take this summer course fromthe Program of Online Geospatial Education at Penn State, taught by Dr. Anthony Robinson.  For more information on this, see this annoucement from Directions Magazine and from Penn State News.    


Tags: GIS, teacher training, mapping, cartography, geospatial, edtech, geography education, unit 1 GeoPrinciples.

Leigha Tew's comment, November 6, 2013 9:41 PM
GIS is redefining mapping skills. In 21st Century education, it is crucial that we communicate GIS literacy in our geography curriculums and classrooms. As a geography teacher it is, therefore, also crucial that I have a thorough and sound knowledge of this field. This course could strongly assist such an understanding as professional development throughout my teaching career.
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When an asteroid gets too close : ImaGeo

When an asteroid gets too close : ImaGeo | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 16, 2013 9:31 AM

Many of you have seen the YouTube video of the meteor in Russia this week (and were you wondering why so many Russians have cameras on their dashboards?).  This show the geologic impact of the largest of meteors and here are links to a map (with the data) of all the known meteorites to have landed.  Pictured above is Meteor Crater in Arizona, one of the most powerful impacts the Earth has even seen.   

Steven Sutantro's curator insight, February 16, 2013 10:14 AM

Beautiful!