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AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO
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Meandering Stream

Meandering Stream | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"I'm used to rivers that know what they're doing."


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Hoffman's comment, September 14, 2013 1:32 PM
hmm, looks like some river had a little to much
Peter Phillips's comment, October 5, 2013 7:31 PM
All rivers move. Those that have a wide, flat basin meander most. Those meanders can be even more dramatic than in this image, snaking 10's of kilometres sideways over time. Combine this action with geological upheaval and it gets even more interesting. Check out images of the Murray River in Australia from space.
Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, December 6, 2013 11:34 AM

Lol... the first words that went through my head were h--- (heck) yeah.  David Bowie... sung by an astronaut... okay, back to Geography. I thought that the rivers reminded me of something I thought of during the talk in class about lava rock being changed into other kinds of rocks over time, and cycling around.  I thought on a larger scale, about this universe, and I have read before that people are studying different areas of space-time fabrics, trying to find origins of the Universe, and answers to other existential questions.  I suppose that if one could trace patterns of rivers, and if one could trace patterns of rocks, to find where they came from, and why/how they came where they came, then by examining the (assumedly tattered and marked) fabrics of space and time, people would be able to determine origins of everything from the beginning of what existed before all universes, and also the origins of life forms.  I enjoyed the movie Prometheus, which was directed by Sir Ridley Scott, and I had to say that I thought that the messages found on rocks in caves, as a catalyst that lead the cast to go visit an alien world that had something to do with human origins, could be very literally taken.  If there are clues in rocks, why wouldn't there be other clues, possibly in celluar components of life forms, or space and time?  Applying the idea of studying rocks and rivers and other physical geographical pursuits to the idea of applying it on a gigantic scale greatly appeals to me.  I believe that humans will find some answers that way, but I hadn't directly realized just that until we mentioned some stuff about physical geography, and glacial forces carrying and spreading out rocks, and deposits and erosion.  After all, the Milky Way has origins, so why believe that we came from the Milky Way, rather than beyond?

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Remote Sensing Images

Remote Sensing Images | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
It's already unlikely we'll get a view as good as the ones collected in "Earth As Art,"

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 15, 2012 12:41 PM

This article and the selected gallery is based on the free e-book "Earth as Art" which I've mentioned here before earlier.  This particular image is fantastic for teaching about geomorphology and river systems.  Students can 'see' the historical layers of a meandering stream winding it's way across the landscape.  Connecting the physical geography to human geography, analyzing the flood plains can help explain the land use and settlement patterns in this Mississippi Delta image.   

UPDATE: Here's another meandering stream image (Willamette River, Oregon) that shows the dynamism of fluvial processes quite nicely.

Steven Sutantro's curator insight, December 20, 2012 8:56 PM

the beauty of our earth...

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Turbulence on the Mekong River

Turbulence on the Mekong River | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
The Mekong River was once a wild and primitive backwater. Today, growing demands for electricity and rapid economic growth are changing the character of what is the world's 12th-longest river.

 

Economic progress for some often entails job loss and environmental degradation for others.  The once isolated and remote Mekong is experiences some impacts of globalization with residents having mixed feelings about the prospects. 


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Michelle Carvajal's curator insight, December 11, 2012 9:04 PM

There must be a better way to transport items and in return save the Mekong river from being degredated. Technological innovations are affecting the life in the river as local fishermen are seeing less and less fish traveling in the river. This is impacting them in the sense that they use these fish for their survival as well as for selling. They fear that in building dams and creating advanced roads over the Mekong will change their enviroment altogether and will hinder their livelihood. This is a beautiful river and I personally feel there could be a better way but there is always something sacrficed when the government choses a location to build on. - M. Carvajal

Emma Lafleur's curator insight, April 30, 2013 8:03 PM

It seems to be a theme that across the bored, people are building things that directly and negatively impact the environment and the local people. There are always two sides to the problem. On one hand, the dam can help with the development of Laos because it will bring in money, but it will also destroy the fish population and therefore many fishermen will lose their jobs and people will lose a food source. It is a difficult problem because Laos needs money because there is a lot of poverty in this rural country and the fishermen do not add a whole lot to the economy, but the people need a way to survive and make money for their families as well. It's a problem that I think will be around for generation to come.

Al Picozzi's curator insight, November 26, 2013 11:35 AM

Seems the price of modernizing will be the local economy that as existed here for centuries.  It is not a small industy either, it is according to the report a billion dollar fishing industry.  However with a growing population and a demand for electricity the river is the perfect source for this power.  This globalization, like all globalization, will help some and will hurt some.  What you have to ask yourself is will it help more than it hurts?  Will it help in the long run, over time?  For everyone involoved in globalization these answeres are never the same everywhere.

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River Meanders: Red River: Oklahoma-Texas Boundary

River Meanders: Red River: Oklahoma-Texas Boundary: It all comes down to ... Geography.

 

This natural and physical border is examined by @josephkerski.


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Pathological Geomorphology

Pathological Geomorphology | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

This is a fabulous archive of some truly beautiful images of earth systems.  This image of Rio Bermejo in Paraguay was described as "the river that looks like a signature."


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Sediment Spews from New England River After Irene

Sediment Spews from New England River After Irene | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Nearly a week after Hurricane Irene drenched New England with rainfall in late August 2011, the Connecticut River was spewing muddy sediment into Long Island Sound and wrecking the region's farmland just before harvest.

 

The effects of the flooding in Vermont and New Hampshire graphically manifested on the downstream parts of the watershed.  Good image for showing fluvial deposition and stream load.   


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Nic Hardisty's comment, September 4, 2012 12:04 PM
Fantastic image, One thing that isn't mentioned is the potential effect that this will have an marine navigation. With such a massive movement of sediment, it's hard to imagine that there won't be deposits left throughout the Connecticut River and Long Island Sound. This can have a tremendous impact on boats traversing the waterways, when a foot of sediment can be the difference between safe passage and running aground.
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Thailand flood reaches Bangkok

Thailand flood reaches Bangkok | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Flood waters inundating Thailand north of Bangkok since July have made the journey south and reached the capital. The disaster is responsible for 400 deaths in Thailand and neighboring Cambodia and Vietnam.

 

Too much of a good thing (water) can literally be disastrous. 


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Catherine Shabo's curator insight, May 3, 2013 12:47 PM

This goes to show how this problem happens to many regions across Earth. What Thailand is experiencing in these photos is something that is happening in many places. Flooding and rising of water leves is increasingly becoming a problem and it becomes even more of a problem when it is ruining their rice crops that take a long time to mend and take care of.

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 19, 1:17 PM
This flood started in northern Thailand and made its way south and affected the country’s capitol, Bangkok. When a large flood hits a country’s mega-city, it causes serious economic impacts. Also, Thailand is the world's biggest rice exporter, but the floods have destroyed over a quarter of the country's crops. Damages from this flood caused billions of dollars worth of damage.
Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 23, 5:01 PM

This flood being record breaking it was a flood that reached from Thailand to Bangkok. Seen from the images it was long lasting and took a toll of 400 deaths from this horrible disaster.

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12 of the Most Beautiful Bays in the World

This is a great set of images that show coastal processes for a geomorphology or physical geography class.  Pictured above is Palm Bay, Australia, which also happens to show fluvial processes as well.  


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Photo of the Day-Iguazu Falls

Photo of the Day-Iguazu Falls | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
See a photo of Iguazu Falls in South America and download free wallpaper from National Geographic.

 

Beautiful image!  South America's equivalent to the Niagara Falls is a place that students should see.


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Cam E's curator insight, February 11, 11:11 AM

I'm adding this to my list of places to go right away! I intend to visit most of the countries in the world in my lifetime, and this just happens to be on the border of two of them. It's a really cool sight even apart from its natural topography. It looks like the border is almost like a gap in the Earth itself. It reminds me a bit of how the Grand Canyon is a divide  close to the borders of Utah, Nevada, and Arizona.

 

Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, February 11, 12:11 PM

This image of Iguazu Falls in South America is just another visual example of how beautiful the world is!

James Hobson's curator insight, September 29, 10:12 PM

(South America topic 3)

What a perfect photo for "National Geographic"! As is the case with many of its other cover or insert photos, it shows what many have seen before (or similar to it), includes a human element in some way, but is taken from an unusual angle or distance. As another example of the pattern I'm noticing, I took a random National Geographic off my bookshelf. The cover shows the Statue of Liberty (a well-known landmark), Manhattan skyscrapers (the human element), but as would be seen from underwater (the unusual perspective). It's something about seeing something familiar from an unfamiliar perspective that makes one stop and reimagine the scope of whatever it is they have experienced.

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A Rio Runs Through It: Naming the American Stream

A Rio Runs Through It: Naming the American Stream | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

Displayed is a map originally produced by Derek Watkins.  This map is a fantastic combination of physical and cultural geography.  While most flowing bodies of water will be called rivers or streams, the lesser used terms (brook, fork, bayou, run, arroyo, etc.) show a striking regionalization of toponym regions.  What do these patterns indicate?  Why are in those toponyms found in those particular places? 


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cookiesrgreat's comment, February 2, 2012 5:10 PM
this is one of my favorite maps. intertwines language, geography, communications and history into one piece
cookiesrgreat's comment, February 2, 2012 5:12 PM
This is one of my favorite maps. Combines geography, language and history
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Vintage Maps Trace the Meandering Mississippi

Vintage Maps Trace the Meandering Mississippi | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

Excellent pieces of cartography...but they highlight the fact that things we think of as fixed and immovable (rivers, mountains, etc.) are a part of incredibly dynamic systems that change.  An analogy with cultural, economic and political situations could easily be made, showing that the only constant on Earth is change.


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