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Why Geography Should Make a Comeback in K-12

Why Geography Should Make a Comeback in K-12 | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Some educators believe that geography is subject that should go hand in hand with the STEM push.

 

Geography used to be a subject that was taught throughout the nation but somewhere along the line it got put on the back burner. Now, in California, educators are finding ways to bring the subject back and their methods may be of interest to parents and teachers beyond the West Coast.

 

Tags: education, K12, geography education, STEM.


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World Literacy Map: Literacy Rate Adult Total of People Ages 15 and Above

World Literacy Map: Literacy Rate Adult Total of People Ages 15 and Above | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Percentage of a country's population that can read and write. Country's define literacy age between 7 and 20 years old. The standard age for literacy most countries is 15 years of age.

 

Tags: education, K12, development, map, worldwide.


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Annenkov's curator insight, August 5, 4:29 PM

My 10 year-old daughter was looking in our atlas a while back (yes, she is my daughter) and in the encyclopedic entry of each country she started noticing that literacy rates were included.  She started asking about which regions had higher and lower literacy rates. This became a teaching moment about the power of the map--I explained that all this data can be more easily accessed and seen on a map and this interactive map is what we discovered.  We need to help student find the maps and data to answer their questions (and we need to make sure that they are curious enough to ask questions about the way the world works).  

Lindley Amarantos's curator insight, August 6, 3:53 PM

My 10 year-old daughter was looking in our atlas a while back (yes, she is my daughter) and in the encyclopedic entry of each country she started noticing that literacy rates were included.  She started asking about which regions had higher and lower literacy rates. This became a teaching moment about the power of the map--I explained that all this data can be more easily accessed and seen on a map and this interactive map is what we discovered.  We need to help student find the maps and data to answer their questions (and we need to make sure that they are curious enough to ask questions about the way the world works).  

geographynerd's curator insight, August 9, 2:21 AM

My 10 year-old daughter was looking in our atlas a while back (yes, she is my daughter) and in the encyclopedic entry of each country she started noticing that literacy rates were included.  She started asking about which regions had higher and lower literacy rates. This became a teaching moment about the power of the map--I explained that all this data can be more easily accessed and seen on a map and this interactive map is what we discovered.  We need to help student find the maps and data to answer their questions (and we need to make sure that they are curious enough to ask questions about the way the world works).  

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The First Day of School Around the World

The First Day of School Around the World | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Take a look at the first day of school celebrations around the world!

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 28, 2014 10:29 AM

Access to education is one of the great indicators of development and political stability--educators wish nothing but the best education possible for the next generation, but the experience is quite variable across the globe.  As many places have recently started school again, this article is a reminder that this practice is experienced differently around the world. 


TagseducationK12, developmentperspective, worldwide.

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World Interactive Map

World Interactive Map | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

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Training in Business's curator insight, January 28, 2014 7:31 PM

World Interactive Map 

 

Karleen Vaughn's curator insight, January 29, 2014 4:20 PM

Saving this for my Social Studies classes ;)

Agueda Fernández's curator insight, January 30, 2014 9:09 AM

Fantástico mapa interactivo muy útil para trabajo en aula.

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10 of the Most Dangerous Journeys to Schools Around the World

10 of the Most Dangerous Journeys to Schools Around the World | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"Many of us have heard the stories of how our parents or grandparents had to walk miles in the snow to get to school. Perhaps some of these tales were a tad embellished, but we got the point. A lot of American kids have the luxury of being driven in a warm car or bus to a good school nearby. This is not the case for the children in this gallery.

The photos you are about to see are snapshots of the treacherous trips kids around the world take each day to get an education. Considering there are currently 61 million children worldwide who are not receiving an education—the majority of which are girls—these walks are seen as being well worth the risk.

In the above photo, students in Indonesia hold tight while crossing a collapsed bridge to get to school in Banten village on January 19, 2012.Flooding from the Ciberang river broke a pillar supporting the suspension bridge, which was built in 2001."


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Rebecca Farrea's curator insight, September 11, 2013 2:52 PM

It is sad what so many children must endure and go through in order to get an education.  I wonder if these bridges and structures have been fixed.  61 million children not receiving an education is 61 million too many.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, April 1, 2014 2:45 PM

unit 6 economic development

Lena Minassian's curator insight, April 13, 2:55 PM

This is really hard to see. Children shouldn't have a hard journey getting to school to get an education and better their lives. These photos are from ten places around the world with the most dangerous journeys to school. This isn't a topic that even comes to mind because many of us living in the United States have had the luxury of being driven to school or riding a bus and we take that simple drive for granted. One of the photos is from Indonesia where students have to cross a collapsing bridge to get to school. The image shows them hanging on for dear life while trying not to fall in the water underneath them. There was a flood that broke the pillar holding this bridge up and it was never fixed after that. What happens when that bridge fully collapses? There needs to be a better way to get these kids to school. These children shouldn't have to suffer with getting their education for situations that are out of their control. 

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Protest in Chile against education system where the wealthy and the poor have a great divide

Protest in Chile against education system where the wealthy and the poor have a great divide | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"June 27, 2013: A protester is hit by a jet of water sprayed by riot police during a protest demanding changes in the state education system in Santiago, Chile, on June 26. Chile has one of the most privatized education systems in the world & a vast gap between wealthy & poor. Students are calling for a more fair education system." (MSN.com)


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Is Your State's Highest-Paid Employee A Coach? (Probably)

Is Your State's Highest-Paid Employee A Coach? (Probably) | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
You may have heard that the highest-paid employee in each state is usually the football coach at the largest state school. This is actually a gross mischaracterization: Sometimes it is the basketball coach.

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Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 11, 2013 11:58 AM

By looking at this map you can see that almost 75% of the United States highest paying public workers are basketball or football coaches. In my opinion this seems a little crazy to think about. I figured it would be maybe the school deans or plastic surgeons like the blue color shows in some states. 

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Education Around the World

Education Around the World | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"A glimpse inside the life of students from Senegal to Vietnam and China."


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Nancy Watson's curator insight, March 15, 2013 5:13 PM

What does this do to your ethnocentric beliefs?

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 23, 2014 4:57 PM

Students in China take their college entrance exam lasting 9hours. To prevent cheating they all take it at the same time with 1,200 in an exam hall. In Guangdong province, on July 9, 2007. 


Alicia Grace Lawson O'Brien's curator insight, July 16, 2014 3:07 PM

This picture is amazing to me! It is so difficult to think about how different education looks in other countries.

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Low-income countries are a cigarette's best friend

Low-income countries are a cigarette's best friend | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

Between 1990 and 2009, cigarette consumption in regions of the world like Western Europe dropped by more than 25% - but that is only one side of the coin.  Historically, cigarette consumption has been a privilege to the rich and high-income countries. Now, with those countries understanding the risks of cancer and the dangers of smoking, the number of smokers decline. But in the past twenty years, for example, the use of cigarettes in the Middle East and Africe has increased by 60%: "Among the 14 countries where 50% or more of men smoke all but one country (Greece) are classified as low- or middle-income."

 

"As consumption rates continue to increase in low- and middle-income countries," the ACS report reads, "these countries will experience a disproportionate amount of tobacco-related illness and death."  In 2009, China consumed 40% of the world's cigarettes.


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Lena Minassian's curator insight, February 18, 7:40 PM

When we think of areas where cigarettes are used the most, wealthier places come to mind because of the economy and access to them. This article states that low-income countries has increased significantly to offset the wealthier countries. For example, in the Middle East, cigarettes consumption has risen to a high of 60%. Greece is the one country that is classified as low or middle income when it comes to 50% or more of men smoking. One of the main reasons behind this is because wealthier countries have started to learn more about the dangers of smoking through aspects like marketing. Cigarette smoking in poorer countries is sadly being driven by the economy today.  

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In a networked world, why is the geography of knowledge still uneven?

In a networked world, why is the geography of knowledge still uneven? | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
In a networked world, why is the geography of knowledge still uneven?The Guardian (blog)Historical maps offer perhaps the best illustration of the geographic limitations to knowledge transmission.

 

While it may seem as though digital technologies is breaking down all age-old barriers, it is removing many barriers for certain segments of the population.  This distinct, often referred to as the 'digital divide,' is one that we can't ignore.  


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Don Brown Jr's comment, September 9, 2012 3:29 PM
This article brings some important question to ponder about when you think about the digital divide and technological diffusion. Within this issue it is revealed that there is more to the chasm between those who do and don’t have access to technology such as the unequal representation of information from certain groups. Diffusion of culture or idea always has a point of origins with technological diffusion taking route in the “Western” world and thus this information tends to have their idea or values. Like many school textbooks the argument can be made that there is a need to diversify the source of information available on the internet around the globe.
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Young Americans shaky on geographic smarts

Young Americans shaky on geographic smarts | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Despite the wall-to-wall coverage of the damage from Hurricane Katrina, nearly one-third of young Americans recently polled couldn’t locate Louisiana on a map and nearly half were unable to identify Mississippi.

 

This is not shocking news, and that is the problem.  

 


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Going Places with GIS and Geography in Education

Going Places with GIS and Geography in Education | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Long-time educator Barbaree Duke has been integrating GIS into her classroom since 2000. As a staffer for the National Council for Geographic Education, she actively advocates the use of GIS for geography education in the K-12 environment.

 

GIS is not just for the specialists producing the data.  Exploratory projects can get students to wanting to ask questions and focus their spatial thinking skills 


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Rich Schultz's curator insight, November 18, 2014 3:01 PM

Always a pleasure to hear from Barbaree Duke...

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Geography online games

Geography online games | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"World geography quizzes from Sheppard Software- over 250 fun map games teach capitals, country locations, and more. Also info on the culture, history, and much more."


This has numerous regional quizzes with a wide variety of skill levels making this the perfect 'Goldilocks' activity (student will need to explore, finding that some activities are too easy, some are too hard, before they find the skill level that is just right).  

 


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The GA: A Different View

"This video forms a lively introduction to A Different View and the themes within it.  A Different View is a manifesto from the Geographical Association. It makes a compelling case for geography's place in the curriculum. But the world changes, and so does the curriculum. A Different View, and the supporting materials on this website, are designed to be used in any context where geography is taught, explained, encouraged or promoted."

 

Tags: education, K12, geography education.


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Bonnie Bracey Sutton's curator insight, August 9, 9:04 PM

We talk about places in the world every day, but we don't study geography. It is important to understand why geography should have a place in the curriculum.

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Why everyone should be able to read a map

Why everyone should be able to read a map | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
New research suggests that map reading is a dying skill in the age of the smartphone. Perish the thought, says Rob Cowen

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Lindley Amarantos's curator insight, September 5, 2014 9:17 AM

this can explain why it is important to NOT always rely on technology. It is good to keep your brain active and the spatial awareness that comes with reading a map is invaluable

Dolors Cantacorps's curator insight, September 5, 2014 3:13 PM

Practiquem-ho a classe doncs!

Richard Lloyd Thomas's curator insight, July 30, 10:52 PM

Despite the gendered overtones of the article (that it's important for men to learn to read a map), this is some good advice, regardless of gender.  The vocabulary and concepts of maps can strengthen spatial cognition and geography awareness.  While GPS technology can help us in a pinch, relying primarily on a system that does not engage our navigation skills will weaken our ability to perform these functions.  While it intuitively makes sense, that the 'mental muscles' would atrophy when not used, it is a reminder that an overuse of geospatial technologies can be intellectually counterproductive.  So break out a trusty ol' map, but more importantly, be a part of the spatial decision-making process. 


Tags: mapping, spatial, technology, education.

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Geography Game

Geography Game | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

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Quiztakes/exam-ples

Quiztakes/exam-ples | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

Education humor/humour.

 

From game show funnies to exam fails, this pinterest board is dedicated to all sorts of funnies in the world of knowledge.

 

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Geographic Ignorance

Geographic Ignorance | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

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Sabrina Conroy's curator insight, July 15, 2013 11:33 AM

Just another prime example of American ignorance. We're all guilty! But to what extent is this our fault and to what extent is it what we're taught at a young age in school. 

David Madrid's curator insight, July 25, 2013 8:27 PM

Existe la ignorancia geofrafica en personajes publicos.

Rebecca Farrea's curator insight, September 11, 2013 2:44 PM

Oh wow...

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The No Good, Very Bad Outlook for the Working-Class American Man

The No Good, Very Bad Outlook for the Working-Class American Man | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

The U.S. economy once worked like a finely meshed machine. That is not true anymore. The U.S. economy is still a powerful engine, but workers aren’t seeing the benefits, less-educated men are struggling, and the rich have disconnected from everyone else.


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 16, 2012 3:39 PM

The problems with the economy are not universally spread throughout society.  Certain segments are impacted more than others by the current struggles, especially when with look at axes of identity, such as class, gender and ethnicity.  While planning on a blue-collar job in the 1950s could have been a solid career plan for a young man in the United States, not so in the 21st century.     


Tags: labor, gender, class, industry, education.

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Struggle For Smarts? How Eastern And Western Cultures Tackle Learning

Struggle For Smarts? How Eastern And Western Cultures Tackle Learning | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
For the most part in American culture, intellectual struggle in school children is seen as an indicator of weakness, while in Eastern cultures it is not only tolerated, it is often used to measure emotional strength.

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Malcolm Haines's curator insight, September 21, 2014 12:20 AM

This is an important time in world history for learning how we all learn. Ultimately East vs West on the cultural field will no longer apply.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 17, 2014 5:31 PM

Today the a lot of focus is being spent on the differences between western and eastern education. A large catalyst in this research is the rise of East Asian economies and the fear many in the west have that their nations are quickly becoming the new under dogs. While their is a difference in education methods one must also wonder if it partially comes down to the government and cultural importance placed on education. During the Cold War America placed a ton of interest and support on our education but after peace came our nation education declined across the board. This might be similar in East Asia while in stead of seeking to overcome the Russians they are seeking to over come their current place in the global community.

Lora Tortolani's curator insight, April 20, 2:25 PM

I actually feel this is a great way to teach students, we just aren’t used to it in America.  The students who already know what they’re doing should be helping those who struggle.  When we boast about how well someone does at something, it can actually discourage the student who doesn’t understand.  It is definitely a tricky situation to be in, but I can understand why.

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20 Classrooms From Around The World

20 Classrooms From Around The World | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

We are all different...we are all the same.   This is a set set of images that highlights the essential similarities in people across cultures.

 


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Nick Lesley's comment, May 27, 2014 3:42 PM
i thought this was very cool and interesting to see different classes all around the world and how their culture is i would really like to see a video on the classes to see how they learn...cool article and good pictures
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The First Grader — Make a Difference

Watch The First Grader trailer and make a difference! For every trailer viewing on YouTube, Capella University will donate $.50* to the following organizatio...

 

The geography of education can provide some heartbreaking as well as heartwarming stories.  This trailer shows the distinction between traditional and popular cultures while highlighting conflicts based on ethnicity and nationalism, all within the post-colonial context in Kenya.


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Exemplary APHG Syllabus...

Exemplary APHG Syllabus... | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

Looking for an excellent AP Human Geography syllabus?  This one comes from a veteran teacher who has been an APHG reader for the past 7 years complete which supplemental materials, handouts powerpoints, vocabulary lists, activities and more.


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World of Geography at your fingertips

World of Geography at your fingertips | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

Worth exploring...this isn't just a single random link.  Geocube is a portal to numerous topics, regions and themes.  

Having been voted by the American Association of School Librarians as one of the "Top 25 websites for Teaching and Learning," Geocube comes highly recommended, and rightfully so (see: http://www.ala.org/aasl/guidelinesandstandards/bestlist/bestwebsitestop25?mid=53 ).  This is a must-see. 


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GIS Ed Community Blog: Why is GIS Valuable?

GIS Ed Community Blog: Why is GIS Valuable? | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
The advent of another GIS Day provides a good opportunity to reflect upon the value of GIS. GIS is used, according to some estimates, by 1.5 million people each day, and by over 400,000 organizations.

 

Favorite quote in the article: "GIS is also valuable because it is not one tool but a system containing hundreds of tools in a single environment."


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Reaction on Post's comment, August 30, 2012 1:48 PM
It's amazing to see how helpful GIS can be. Without it, I believe the world would be much less advanced than it is.
Sam Henry's comment, September 4, 2012 10:19 AM
It's amazing to think how people used to have to make maps. Growing up with technology, one doesn't realize what people had to do to convey the same data without GIS
Lisa Fonseca's comment, September 4, 2012 6:57 PM
Until reading this article I would have never known how valuable GIS really is to so many people. 1.5 million people each day,by over 400,000 organizations use GIS, thats amazing. It is also so valuable because it has made the job of those creating maps a lot easier. They now have more time to analyze spatial data, examine patterns, relationships, and trends, and not just spend hours and hours to create one map. Overall GIS is a valuable and useful tool for a variety of reasons not just in map making but also in communicating complex ideas.