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AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO
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4000 Deaths And Counting: The Ebola Epidemic In 4 Charts

4000 Deaths And Counting: The Ebola Epidemic In 4 Charts | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
The number of deaths in West Africa continues to rise at an exponential rate. These charts help explain the latest trends.

Via Martin Daumiller
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Martin Daumiller's curator insight, October 14, 2014 4:28 AM

The death toll for the Ebola virus disease in West Africa has now passed 4000 with a total number of cases exceeding 8000 and a fatality rate of est. 71% (accounting for the time lag between diagnosis and clinical disease outcomes). As of 14 September, the doubling time is 16 days in Guinea, 24 days in Liberia and 30 days in Sierra Leone. The infection in West Africa had a basic reproductive number of R_0~1.7-2 (with R_0 being the number of people who catch the disease from one sick person, on average, in an outbreak; defined as the triple product of the transmissibility (i.e., probability of infection given contact between a susceptible and infected individual), the average rate of contact between susceptible and infected individuals, and the duration of infectiousness) that appears to be quite low in contrast to other diseases such as measles (R_0=12-18) as Ebola isn't spread through the air, like the measles or flu and requires close contact with some bodily fluid, such as blood or vomit, containing the virus. However one may not be blinded by this low R_0 value, as the R_0 is integrated over the time that a person is infectious to others. For HIV, this could be years., but for Ebola, that time is only about a week. As the WHO Global Response Team conclude in their recent study: “These data indicate that without drastic improvements in control measures, the numbers of cases of and deaths from [Ebola virus disease] are expected to continue increasing from hundreds to thousands per week in the coming months.” Due to the incubation time for approx. ten days (in which it is at least not yet contagious), wide spread can occur unnoticed, especially since early Ebola symptoms are also symptoms of other viral infections.

analise moreno's curator insight, October 14, 2014 7:49 PM

The population in West Africa is decreasing rapidly, in Africa they don't have as well medical care so the people are dying. It is noteworthy because I am interested in the topic "Ebola" and we are learning about CBR and CDR. 

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Health Risks and Migration: Interview With Alice Mesnard, City University London

The Population and Poverty (PopPov) Research Network brings together researchers who are examining how population dynamics affect economic outcomes, primaril...

Via Clairelouise
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