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AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO
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France to redraw nation's map to save money

France to redraw nation's map to save money | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"France's administrative regions — Normandy, Alsace, Burgundy, etc. — have long been part of the identity of citizens of this diverse country. Now, merging some of them is seen as a logical way to save money on bureaucracy, and the French support it — as long as it's someone else's turf."


Via Seth Dixon, Scarpaci Human Geography
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Jordan Schemmel's curator insight, May 21, 2014 1:04 PM

How countries identify smaller administrative regions is crucial to understanding both how they are governed, and how these regions impact cultural differences.

Kampe Kyle's curator insight, May 28, 2014 10:18 PM

In AP Human Geo., this article relates to the theme of redistricting and political reapportionment because it involves the redrawing of geographic boundaries within a country in order to facilitate a certain political and economic outcome.

Joy Kinley's curator insight, June 16, 2014 3:28 PM

It is amazing that people are all for redrawing and redistricting until it impacts them.  This is a touchy subject in the United States with some small towns and communities merging even though they only have decades of identity not centuries.  If these merges happen in France I see that there will be many strikes and protests and when it is over everyone still would maintain what they would call their "real identity" not what France gave them.  

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The Great Mosque of Djenné

The Great Mosque of Djenné | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
The Great Mosque of Djenné, Mali, is a magnet for tourists, but it is increasingly difficult for locals to live a normal life around it.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 7, 2013 2:03 PM

This New York Times short video is an intriguing glimpse into some of the cultural pressures behind having the designation of being an official world heritage site.  The grerat mosque combined with the traditional mud-brick feel to the whole city draws in tourists and is a source of communal pride, but many homeowners want to modernize and feel locked into traditional architecture by outside organizations that want them to preserve an 'authentic' cultural legacy.


Tags: Islam, tourism, place, religion, culture, historical, community, Mali, Africa.

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Dark Days: When the Colts Left Baltimore

A look back on the 27th Anniversary of the the NFL Colts dark flight from Baltimore in the middle of the night.

 

BM: When the Colts left they took the heart of Balitmore and left the fans in utter disbelief. Robert Irsay had no intention of staying whether he got his new staidum for the Colts or not, he wanted out and had been looking since 1976. The city of Baltimore was not going to budge on the construction of a new pubically funded stadium simply because it was too expensive and the citry didn't have the money. All that remained in Baltimore was an empty Memorial Stadium, which wasn't perfect but was in really decent shape and the Orioles. 

 

SD: Why are sports teams treated so differently from other businesses?  How are teams linked to place in such intimate ways?  What is the economic impact of a sports team on the city and how could relocation damage that city?  See this scoop.it topic for more on the cultural and economic impacts of sports teams on cities.


Via Brandon Murphy, Seth Dixon
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Ms. Harrington's comment, August 8, 2012 9:09 AM
I never knew about this particular team, but I can see how a sports franchise abandoning a city has a devastating effect. It seems like there was a deliberate attempt to "sneak"out.
Roland Trudeau Jr.'s comment, August 8, 2012 9:16 AM
Quite a blow to the entire city of Baltimore, you can see from the older footage as well as the new how badly this effected this city. A huge impact on the people, seemingly crushing spirits across the city.
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Colorful Places & Spaces

Colorful Places & Spaces | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
It is only right to start this site off with photos of the Holsteiner Stairs by artist Horst Glaesker. In 2008, I saw photos of this installation in Wuppertal, Germany and I knew I had to create a colour blog.

 

How can public art help create a sense of place?  How does this transform the neighborhood and community?  What are the cultural and econommic impacts of public art?       


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Food stamps put RI town on monthly boom-and-bust cycle

Food stamps put RI town on monthly boom-and-bust cycle | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

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Dias Vidia's curator insight, April 2, 2013 2:05 AM

http://redgage.com/photos/macb/postage-us-liberty-of-all-15-c.html

Kendra King's curator insight, January 28, 4:11 PM

The story of food stamps displays how the government aide helps more than the individuals in the short term. I always knew that the people on food stamps benefited because they are now obviously able to eat better than they would if left on their own. However, I never really realized just how much of the government money also went back into the businesses. Without that money I am sure some of the stores in Woonsocket would have closed sooner. I say sooner because since this article was written in 2013 a good deal of stores in Woonsocket closed or relocated (Shaw’s, Walmart, Dots, Home Depot, and Staples). Seeing firsthand how many businesses closed of recent is a clear indication of how the aid wasn’t enough. Still even going based on the information in the article, there were other indications of Woonsocket’s lagging business economy. For instance, one section mentions how Jourie thought Woonsocket was a “town disappeared into twisting two-lane roads, shadowy mills and abandoned smokestacks.” Mills were a strong economic center so long ago that the buildings should have been updated by more modern businesses. Yet, this hasn’t happened. It is a wonder how Woonsocket hasn’t figured out a way to attract more business from surrounding towns sooner given that government aide won’t keep business going.


Still, the people under this system are part of a process that doesn’t seem to stop repeating. Following the perspective of Rebecka, you see how businesses just tries to tempt the consumers who all flock to the stores on the first of the month falsely believing they are getting a better deal. Then you watch Rebecka try to shop under stress thereby causing her to spend money she shouldn’t be either. Then, when all is said and done, she looks longingly at the start of the calendar for the next first of the month. It appears the first of the month is on her mind even before it is well in sight. This type of thinking seems to trap Rebecka in an endless cycle of poverty. While I sympathize for the women who tried to get more work, she shouldn’t just continue on in a dead end job while barely surviving on food stamps. Go back to school, spread out how you spend the money, (maybe try saving some of it for more necessary items rather than tattoos), and change the cycle. The factors in the article show how this could be hard to do, but it isn’t impossible for her to gain control of her own life either.

    

While I understand this trap is partly a result of the economic recession, there were other factors at play.  The story was partly told from the perspective of someone with a high school degree, who seemed to stop school because of a child. Given how little someone makes when an individual fails to continue his/her schooling it is no wonder she is on food stamps. Furthermore, the fact that Woonsocket is full of low income housing continues to explain why so many people with food stamps flock to the town. If the people can’t really afford homes than it is no surprise they are on food stamps too. Woonsocket’s housing prices have always been like this even before the economic recession though. As such, the town’s population was already dependent on food stamps (something I am well aware of given that I live in the town next door). So I wonder just how much the economic recession actually increased the use of food stamps on the already poverty stricken town. 

Kendra King's curator insight, January 28, 7:53 PM

The story of food stamps displays how the government aide helps more than the individuals in the short term. I always knew that the people on food stamps benefited because they are now obviously able to eat better than they would if left on their own. However, I never really realized just how much of the government money also went back into the businesses. Without that money I am sure some of the stores would have closed sooner. I say sooner because since this article was written in 2013 a good deal of stores in Woonsocket closed or relocated (Shaw’s, Walmart, Dots, Home Depot, and Staples). Seeing firsthand how many businesses closed of recent is a clear indication of how the aid wasn’t enough. Still even going based on the information in the article, there were other indications of Woonsocket’s lagging business economy. For instance, one section mentions how Jourie thought Woonsocket was a “town disappeared into twisting two-lane roads, shadowy mills and abandoned smokestacks.” Mills were a strong economic center so long ago that the buildings should have been updated by more modern businesses. Yet, this hasn’t happened. It is a wonder how Woonsocket hasn’t figured out a way to attract more business from surrounding towns sooner given that government aide won’t keep business going.

 

Still, the people under this system are part of a process that doesn’t seem to stop repeating. Following the perspective of Rebecka, you see how businesses just tries to tempt the consumers who all flock to the stores on the first of the month falsely believing they are getting a better deal. Then you watch Rebecka try to shop under stress thereby causing her to spend money she shouldn’t be either. Then, when all is said and done, she looks longingly at the start of the calendar for the next first of the month. It appears the first of the month is on her mind even before it is well in sight. This type of thinking seems to trap Rebecka in an endless cycle of poverty. While I sympathize for the women who tried to get more work, she shouldn’t just continue on in a dead end job while barely surviving on food stamps. Go back to school, spread out how you spend the money, (maybe try saving some of it for more necessary items rather than tattoos), and change the cycle. The factors in the article show how this could be hard to do, but it isn’t impossible for her to gain control of her own life either.     

 

While I understand this trap is partly a result of the economic recession, there were other factors at play.  The story was partly told from the perspective of someone with a high school degree, who seemed to stop school because of a child. Given how much little someone makes when an individual fails to continue his/her schooling it is no wonder she is on food stamps. Furthermore, the fact that Woonsocket is full of low income housing continues to explain why so many people with food stamps flock to the town. If the people can’t really afford homes than it is no surprise they are on food stamps too. Woonsocket’s housing prices have always been like this even before the economic recession though. As such, the town’s population was already dependent on food stamps (something I am well aware of given that I live in the town next door). So I wonder just how much the economic recession actually increased the use of food stamps on the already poverty stricken town. 

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Landfill Harmonic


Via Seth Dixon
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Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 14, 2014 7:02 PM

This video shows that even thoughts living in absolute poverty are able to create beautiful things. While the instruments are clearly made from trash the music they produce is almost impossible to tell apart from expensive proper instruments. The ingenuity of these people is remarkable and really an incredible thing to watch.

Louis Mazza's curator insight, February 12, 7:02 PM

Here in Cateura, Paraguay the inhabitants live on a landfill. the quote in the begining of the video says, "the world sends us garbage, we send back music", and it couldn't be more accurate than that. citizens recycle the garbage and sell it. it is very inspiring to see these people make the best of their situation, when a lot of people in America complain about traffic, and menial problems. While going through the trash a violin shell was found which sparked imagination. people started to make instruments like violins, flutes, and cellos. Cateura now has a whole recycled orchestra that makes beautiful sounds. hearing and seeing this wonderful progress from thrown away items, i wonder what Americans could produce with the trash that is thrown away here. with the highest point in RI the Johnston Landfill, we must have some good trash. 

Norka McAlister's curator insight, February 14, 7:54 PM

It is amazing on how these slum residents have a brilliant idea in how to convert waste and trash into a gorgeous music. Imagination plays a giant roll into poverty. People need to subsist and imagination makes this possible by taking anything in their environment and having it serve a particular purpose. The high percentage of contamination in this pollute field is another pressing matter, however this issue does not stop residents from pursuing their dreams. Enhancing their skills in music by making musical instruments out of trash, allows them to escape from their problems. In this little town in Paraguay, poverty and excess waste is prevalent in this society, but the residents take advantage of their waste polluted fields and make musical instruments out of what they find in them. Furthermore, this ingenuity helps children and improves their overall quality of life.

 

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GIS for home buyers

GIS for home buyers | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Whoa, check out Trulia Local - A visual way to explore crime, schools, home prices, and local data.

 

The map above was generated to display the areas within a 30 minute commute of Rhode Island College in Providence.  This site generates commuting maps and other layers that are especially pertinent for home buyers---schools, crime stats, property values and local amenities.  This is GIS data brought to the real estate shopping community, but consider this a project in the making.  One of the best exercises to get to know a place holistically is to shop for housing and make some locational analysis decisions.


Via Seth Dixon
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