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Africa, Uncolonized: A Detailed Look at an Alternate Continent

Africa, Uncolonized: A Detailed Look at an Alternate Continent | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
What if the Black Plague had killed off almost all Europeans? Then the Reconquista never happens. Spain and Portugal don't kickstart Europe's colonization of other continents. And this is what Africa might have looked like.

 

Tags: Africa, colonialism, borders, historical, map.


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Edelin Espino's curator insight, December 13, 2014 2:21 PM

Africa without the Europe's colonization could have led Latin America to a different development. Maybe less countries or more, who knows.

Alec Castagno's curator insight, December 17, 2014 10:37 AM

It is fascinating to see how different the political borders of Africa would have been without European colonial influence. One thing this map predicts is that if the Europeans would not have pushed into Africa, Arab and Islamic influences would have filled the void. The huge number of independent states or regions on this map show how large the continent is and how many different ethnic and religious groups there are.

Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, December 17, 2014 5:59 PM

I sometimes do question, what would Africa look like today if it weren't colonized by the Europeans. Before the discovery of Africa, Africa was a land that was dominated by wealthy kingdoms that spent most of its time conquering other countries. With the ideology that Africa was a land flowing with milk and honey inhabited by uncivilized human beings, conquering Africa seemed like the ideal thing for European super powers to do in order to exploit the lands natural resource at no cost. If Africa was not colonized by Europeans, Africans would have more access to their own natural resources, and the instability that most of African countries face today would most likely not be in existence.

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40 Maps That Explain The Middle East

40 Maps That Explain The Middle East | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
These maps are crucial for understanding the region's history, its present, and some of the most important stories there today.

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Nancy Watson's curator insight, October 11, 2014 9:16 AM

Both History and Geography explained in these maps

Shanelle Zaino's curator insight, October 22, 2014 3:10 PM

With the increasing amount of information online it can be misleading at times. I do believe this is a useful collection of maps however I feel people looking at it might get trapped in a pitfall. After looking at these 40 maps a person could feel that this is all there is to know about this subject. Yes it is informative to have this information together but it should just be the start of the conversation not the end. So often we want quick google searches with definite answers,

when some topics require a lot of research from different sources. The reader needs to make up their own pool of knowledge.

Sreya Ayinala's curator insight, November 30, 2014 9:53 PM

Unit 1 Nature and Perspectives of Geography

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Iraq's Current Devolution

"A radical fringe Islamic group names ISIS is fighting to establish a extremist Islamic state in Iraq and Syria...and beyond. They control eastern Syria, western Iraq, just took control of Iraq's 2nd largest city of Mosul and are advancing on the capital Baghdad.  In this podcast, the professor John Boyer outlines just a few of the contributing factors to why this significant event is taking place, the geographic/historic background of the state, and the consequences for the future of the region."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 18, 2014 8:41 AM

If you haven't yet discovered John Boyer, a.k.a. the Plaid Avenger,  I recommend exploring his site.  He has numerous resources for world regional geography and current global affairs.  His colorful persona is highly entertaining for college age-students as his class attracts over 3,000 students each semester (you can decide for yourself whether that personality works for you and your classroom).  This particular 'plaidcast' discussion focuses on Iraq's current devolution and possible total collapse. 


Tags: SyriaIraq, MiddleEast, conflict, political, geopoliticsborders, colonialism, devolution.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, June 23, 2014 12:27 PM

unit 4

Michael Mazo's curator insight, October 6, 2014 3:04 PM

Iraq's position in regards to the militant groups has steadily affected the countries global and economic status in more ways than one. As these militant groups such as ISIS continue to grow then so will their territory and intensity of self-less acts. Not only are these groups a disease to the world but they affect the way our global economy works. ISIS controls oil fields and vast amounts of land in Iraq, Syria and other middle-eastern countries. In my opinion, America's decision to fire airstrikes onto these militant groups could be both good and bad. Good because it will decrease the amount of ISIS members but bad because it could be an incentive for ISIS to cause further damage and chaos in reference to revenge. At this pace, ISIS and other such groups will gain claimed territory in which will come at the cost of innocent lives of women and children. They must be stopped before issues get worse.

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Business Languages In Africa

Business Languages In Africa | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"The Main Languages of Business in Africa."


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Edelin Espino's curator insight, December 5, 2014 10:54 AM

Looks like English colonist did a better job. Is weird to see Spanish placed in that location, when "spain" is very close to the northwest dominated by Arabic.

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, December 15, 2014 4:53 PM

This map shows the different languages that are used for business dealings in Africa. It is interesting to see that Africa itself has many languages, but not one of them is predominantly used. The two languages that are mainly used in Africa are English and French, with  Arabic, Portuguese, Spanish and a combination of Arabic and French used in Mauritania, while English and French is used in Madagascar.

Alec Castagno's curator insight, December 17, 2014 11:38 AM

The continued influence of colonization can be seen when this map is compared with maps of colonial Africa. The dominant business language match up almost exactly with the country that used to dominate the area. The fact that these languages are used for business shows how the deep impacts the European settlers had across the continent. Even the northern portion of the continent shows the strong influence and ties the region has with the Arabic world. 

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Choices Program--Scholars Online

Choices Program--Scholars Online | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

Scholars Online Videos feature top scholars answering a specific question in his or her field of expertise. These brief and informative videos are designed to supplement the Choices Program curricula.


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Hector Alonzo's curator insight, November 2, 2014 10:17 PM

This video shows how Afghanistan's very geography was used to ease some of the tension between Russia and British India. Using the Wakhan Border both the countries surrounding Afghanistan would not share a common border.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 15, 2014 7:01 PM

Afghanistan is without a doubt one of the most unstable nations in the Middle East today. Why is this? This video explains that the borders of the nation were artificially drawn by the British and Russian empires to serve as a boundary between them. Because they simply wanted a buffer zone they devoted little energy to making sure the various people within the borders would get along. Because of this falling the Europeans created a country with a diverse population that has for centuries created instability and chaos.  

Alec Castagno's curator insight, December 17, 2014 1:20 PM

Much of Afghanistan, both culturally and politically, has developed through the interests of other, larger geopolitical forces. The current borders are a reflection of previous empires, like the Russian and British Empires, and superpowers, like the Soviet Union and United States. Even parts of their culture, like holidays, are influences from other regions.

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Out of Africa – Did the Colonial Powers ever Really Leave?

Out of Africa – Did the Colonial Powers ever Really Leave? | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Africa may have achieved independence, but the old colonial ties are still important as France’s decision to send troops to Mali to fight Islamist extremists shows.

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Nathan Chasse's curator insight, March 25, 2014 12:59 PM

Colonial ties are still very prevalent due to Europe's dependence upon the resources of Africa. European countries like England and France invest billions in Africa, not to help those African nations, but to build infrastructure for resource extraction or to keep governments stable. Though the true exploitation of Africa has ended, the current situation certainly has the ring of exploitation as the people of Europe enjoy the diamonds and chocolate harvested by the multitudes of impoverished people of Africa.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 4:04 PM

Colony powers are still located within Africa. Just because Africa is technically independent doesn't mean that British Colonial power isn't still in place.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, September 11, 2014 2:11 PM

unit 4

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Roots of the Mali Crisis

January 19, 2013—The West African nation of Mali is making headlines after a wave of French military actions on Islamic extremist groups now controlling the northern part of the country. National Geographic Senior Writer Peter Gwin has...

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Araceli Vilarrasa Cunillé's curator insight, February 6, 2013 6:37 AM

La crisi propera no es deixa fer prou atenció als canvis geopolítics a l' Africa.

Emma Lafleur's curator insight, March 29, 2013 3:32 PM

   This video clip that is great for learning not only about the situation in Mali, but how history leads to the events of today and how much one country can affect another country.

   When Europe colonized  Africa they created borders that separated groups of people that should have stayed together, and they put different ethnic groups together that should have been separated. With this alone comes great conflict because ethnic groups and neighboring tribes that have had conflicts for years now have to operate under the same government somehow and no one is ever really happy so conflicts arise.

    Also, the Arab Spring broke out which brought on all these new ideas and opportunities for the people to revolt and change their country, and some of the people left Libya after the fall of Gadaffi and went to Mali bringing their weapons and anger with them. All of these events led to the Mali crisis today, and it is interesting to see how much one country affects another country and as a history major I am greatly interested in how the history of the country brings about the events of today.

Al Picozzi's comment, July 18, 2013 12:15 PM
The borders were randomly drawn without taking culture, language, beliefs of the native populations etc into account. However drawing borders along ethnic lines didn't work in Europe after WWI. Alot of ethnic minorities were in countires that did not feel welcome. That was one reason for WWII
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A History of Conflicts

A History of Conflicts | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Browse the timeline of war and conflict across the globe.

 

This database of global wars and conflicts is searchable through space and time.  You can drag and click both the map and timeline to locate particular battles and wars, and then read more information about that conflict.  This resource would be a great one to show students and let them explore to find what they see as interesting.  This site is brimming with potential.     


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Sakis Koukouvis's comment, August 16, 2012 8:06 AM
Oh... You are lucky ;-)
Paul Rymsza's comment, August 22, 2012 2:15 PM
the potential of this site is amazing between the interactive learning system and the correlation between the timeline and location. If the human geography class is anything like this i can't wait for it!
Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 28, 2013 3:34 PM

 

This database of global wars and conflicts is searchable through space and time.  You can drag and click both the map and timeline to locate particular battles and wars, and then read more information about that conflict.  This resource would be a great one to show students and let them explore to find what they see as interesting.  This site is brimming with potential.    

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The Border That Stole 500 Birthdays

The Border That Stole 500 Birthdays | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
The story behind the the International Date Line.

 

Not too long ago (Jan. 2012), the arbitrary International Date Line (roughly opposite the Prime Meridian) was moved to better accommodate the regional networks and economic geography of the area straddling the line.  American Samoa, although politically aligned with the United States, was functionally more integrated on the Asian side of the Pacific Rim when it came to their trade partners and their tourism base.  Dynamic economic networks, political allegiances and cultural commonalities create a beautifully complex situation near this 'border.'    


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Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 17, 2014 5:57 PM

This article covers an example of a border being drawn for seemingly little reason. This International Date Line is drawn without a straight path swerving around nations. This has lead to some people living with in these bulges to in turn lose time itself. These arbitrary lines can have unseen effects upon people and nations. 

Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, December 17, 2014 8:22 PM

I'm a bit confused at this article. Are the people who lost their birthdays a cause of a new border creation or a time zone?

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 17, 2014 10:18 PM

Makes you think about the political and economic influences on just about anything. What time or day it is is an important element to a global economy. Know when business deals can be made in an instance knowing what standards are most efficient can alter systems of dating. That is why instead of having a straight line the line is jutting out in spots. Usually we think of our time zones being dependent on where the sun in relation to our location but in this instance we see that it is merely a man made line that can be altered. 

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The sun never sets... on the Facebook Empire

The sun never sets... on the Facebook Empire | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
How Facebook connections mirror old empires EIGHT years ago Facebook launched as an online social network connecting a small college community from a dorm room at Harvard University.

 

These graphics show how in a post-colonial world, former colonies are still socially intertwined in a cultural network that mirrors the empires of yesteryear. Why are these modern social networks so similar to imperial patterns? What economic explanations are there for these patterns? What is the cultural impact?


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Lona Pradeep Parad's curator insight, May 29, 2014 11:38 AM

How fb has made physical distance obsolete, connecting cultures to different cultures on a global scale.

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Belize: A Spanish Accent in an English-Speaking Country

Belize: A Spanish Accent in an English-Speaking Country | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
BELIZE has long been a country of immigrants. British timber-cutters imported African slaves in the 18th century, and in the 1840s Mexican Mayans fled a civil war.

 

Belize has a much higher Human Development Index ranking that its Central American neighbors such as Guatemala.  That fact alone makes Belize a likely destination for migrants.  Given that Belize was 'British Honduras' during colonial times, English is (still) the official language, but that is changing as increasingly Spanish-speaking immigrants are changing the cultural profile of Belize.        


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James Hobson's curator insight, September 25, 2014 10:12 AM

(Central America topic 1)

I see many similarities between the experiences of Belize and the United States recently. First, there is the struggle for some to adapt to the growing use of the Spanish language. The article states that it is becoming harder and harder for monologists to find jobs, and from what I have seen and experienced the same can be said here. Also, both countries have used immigrants as 'political tools', such as Belize's supposed rapid acceptance of around 1,000 just before an election. This relates locally, at least in my opinion, to the supporters and opposition to Rhode Island's voter ID law, among other examples.

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, September 28, 2014 6:23 PM

The migration to Belize and the restoration of the  Spanish language can be seen as a good thing for the identity of the country.  As a nation of migrants they are veering away from the British connotation of British Honduras

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, September 29, 2014 12:24 PM

Belize is in the midst of some important changes. Historically, Belize was settled by the British who imported slaves from Africa, thus providing Belize with a strong English speaking background. With more and more Salvadorians and Guatemalans seeking out Belize for work, the influx of Spanish speakers may impact the necessity to speak Spanish. While there is little hostility between ethnic groups, those native to Belize are finding it harder and harder to come by work, and many are getting pushed out of jobs because they are not fluent in Spanish.  

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How did Pakistan get it's name?

How did Pakistan get it's name? | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"The name of the country Pakistan has a fascinating history - it is essentially an acronym!  Prior to 1947, the country now known as Pakistan was a British colony. In 1947 the United Kingdom granted independence to the region under a new name, Pakistan. The name had been developed by a group of students at Cambridge University who issued a pamphlet in 1933 called Now or Never."

 

In a country with such great ethnic divisions, a common religion is a powerful nationalizing force.  As the capital city of Islamabad's toponym powerfully states (the house or abode of Islam), religion remains an important element of national identity for Pakistanis.   


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Brett Sinica's curator insight, November 19, 2013 2:27 PM

When you take in the way that the British Empire controlled many colonies and tried to spread their culture to such diverse regions, it is no suprise that Pakistan was named essentially by a game of Scrabble.  I suppose the naming is somewhat creative and certainly unique compared to how other countries get their names, yet just picturing a group of colleagues naming a country is strange.  Though the U.K. did grant them independance, how independant were they really if they weren't even given the right to name their own land.

James Hobson's curator insight, November 11, 2014 12:55 PM

(South Asia topic 5)

The name "Pakistan" can be thought of as more of a "Mexicali" or "Calexico" than an "Afghanistan" or "Turkmenistan." In other words, it is an acronym, which I was surprised to learn. Though is can also be translated as "land of the Paks", there is no specific group by that name. Relating back to a previous Scoop, this shows the importance of validation and reasoning, as opposed to 'blind belief.'

I think the use of an acronym for the new nation's name (a toponym) was a very intuitive option to choose; no ethnic group could complain that their name didn't make it into the name of their nation while others' did. This seems to be a form of equal representation.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 17, 2014 1:28 AM

This article is very interesting as it explains the origin of the name Pakistan. Like many people I assumed that the name had to do with some old ethnic group but in reality its something of an acronym. Interestingly enough Pakistan is incredibly diverse and really only held together by the common Islamic religion. Names which are acronyms are more common place in government plans or cheesy infomercial products rather than the names of countries.     

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The long and ugly tradition of treating Africa as a dirty, diseased place

The long and ugly tradition of treating Africa as a dirty, diseased place | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
How alarmist, racist coverage of Ebola makes things worse. A dressing down of the latest #NewsweekFail.

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Christian Allié's curator insight, October 18, 2014 3:33 AM

..................""""""""""""""""""""""""""""".............

 

[ ...]

 

_ Vidéo_

 

............... 

The Newsweek story could generate additional prejudice against African migrants, a population that already suffers from greater prejudice than other immigrant groups. In the psychology study referenced above, researchers found that simply manipulating the geographical origin of a hypothetical immigrant group – from Eastern Africa to Eastern Asia to Eastern Europe — yielded significant differences in attitudes in a study population toward the immigrant group.

 

Fear-mongering narratives about Ebola circulating in the popular media can also have a serious effect on knowledge and attitudes about Ebola. Though there are no cases of person-to-person infection in the United States, a recent poll conducted by the Harvard School of Public Health reports 39 percent of Americans think there will be a large Ebola outbreak in the United States and more than a quarter of Americans are concerned that they or someone in their immediate family may get sick with Ebola in the next year. A similar poll conducted for Reason-Rupe had four in 10 Americans saying an Ebola outbreak in the United States was likely, and conservative Americans were more likely to say an outbreak was likely. These two national surveys show Americans are grossly overestimating their risk of infection.

 

The long history of associating immigrants and disease in America and the problematic impact that has on attitudes toward immigrants should make us sensitive to the impact of “othering” African immigrants to the United States in the midst of the current Ebola outbreak in West Africa. Scare-mongering about infinitesimally small risks in one context serves no purpose to the greater good of trying to curb disease transmission and relieve people’s suffering in another context.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, October 20, 2014 12:40 PM

unit 3 and 4

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, October 20, 2014 3:29 PM

The long and ugly tradition of treating Africa as a dirty, diseased place

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African borders

African borders | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"About the history of the creation of Africa borders and debates about African borders."


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Darleana McHenry's curator insight, June 26, 2014 7:33 AM

I thought that this was interesting and decided to share it.

 

Beatrice Sarni's curator insight, July 7, 2014 3:36 AM

always an interesting discussion...

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 7:50 PM

APHG-U4

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How the Potato Changed the World

How the Potato Changed the World | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Brought to Europe from the New World by Spanish explorers, the lowly potato gave rise to modern industrial agriculture

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Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 28, 2014 11:41 PM

Potatoes were brought to the New World through the Columbian Exchange. It does have a negative connotation but the trade route was used to diffuse cultures by trading food. 

Gina Panighetti's curator insight, August 4, 2014 5:35 PM

Columbian Exchange Unit

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 13, 2014 12:57 PM

Potatoes are one of the most widespread foods in the world, due to its resiliency to harsh weather conditions and its ability to grow to large sizes. Potatoes can also be traced to show the beginning forces of globalization. Before modern communication and transportation technology, globalization occurred at a much slower rate. Globalization spread through trade routes in the forms of foods, resources, and therefore cultures and people. 

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What's in a Name?

What's in a Name? | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

The Pentagon has upset patriots by labeling the body of water between Korea and Japan in an exhibition depicting various battles fought during the 1950-53 Korean War as "Sea of Japan" rather than "East Sea."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 13, 2013 10:14 AM

Earlier this week I posted on whether a group of islands off the coast of Argentina should be called the Falkland Islands or Las Malvinas.  There is some geopolitical significance to which name you ascribe to particular places.  Does it matter if I call the sea to the east of the Korean Peninsula the "East Sea" and if someone else refers to this same body of water west of Japan the "Sea of Japan?"  For many years the Sea of Japan has been the defacto name internationally and South Korean officials have lobbied (quite successfully) to bolster the legitimacy of the name within the media, publishers and cartographers and other governments.  Last summer, a worker in the South Korean government's Ministry of Foreign Affairs requested that I share some resources that state South Korea's position(see also this 10 minute video), showing their commitment to this rebranding effort.  Also see this GeoCurrents article on the subject in 2012, after South Korea's failed attempt to get international recognition.


Questions to Ponder: What other places have multiple names?  What are the political overtones to the name distinctions? What are other tricky places on the map where distinct groups would label/draw things differently?  Is the map an 'unbiased' source of information? 


Tags: language, toponyms, South Korea, historical, colonialism, cartography.

Justin McCullough's curator insight, October 17, 2013 10:16 AM

I agree with Peter Kim and others that are fighting to have the name changed to the East Sea. The term "Sea of Japan" was used in colonial times of South Korea. Now that those times are long gone, it I can understand why South Korea would want to get rid of anything related to that time period. This actually reminds of something that I'm going over in my colonial history class; the Pueblo Revolt (1680). During this time Indians revolted against the Spanish colonizers oppressing them and taking away their traditions, forcibly converting them to Christianity. During their revolt the Indians destroyed many of the Spanish institutions, especially those related to religion. They destroyed churches and even defaced the statues of the saints, and returned to their traditional practices.

This article also reminded of Sri Lanka changing the its colonial name on Government institutions from Ceylon to Sri Lanka. This happened not to long ago. The Island's colonial name (Ceylon) was dropped when they became their own country in 1972. However, the name Ceylon remained on many of the Government institutions (e.g. Bank of Ceylon or Ceylon Fisheries Corporation). However, in 2010 the name was dropped for good.  

James Hobson's curator insight, November 21, 2014 9:55 PM

(East Asia topic 10 [an independent topic])

{And finally a topic outside of China...}

Just as mentioned in a Scoop from a previous topic section, names can be viewed as more than a word which identifies a place. The context of a name can run very deep and be highly contentious. In this case "Sea of Japan" and "East Sea" are contenders for the official name of the body of water between Japan, Korea, and Russia. Sea of Japan is an older term with more of a history, which especially invokes mentioning of the Korean War. East Sea is a post-war term hopes to remove national tension form its name.

   Should officials really 'rename the wheel', or can the original name be accepted just because of its location and historical use? Or perhaps neither of these options, or even a national-level split as is currently the case?

   Personally, I see it as the difference between Aquidneck Island and Rhode Island (the actual island, of course), or even relatable to French fries vs. freedom fries. Physical things don't change just because their names do. In my view, perhaps everybody should just choose whichever they are more familiar with and comfortable using, while taking into consideration and expressing that their reference of a location is not meant to imply any political views.

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Out of Africa – Did the Colonial Powers ever Really Leave?

Out of Africa – Did the Colonial Powers ever Really Leave? | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Africa may have achieved independence, but the old colonial ties are still important as France’s decision to send troops to Mali to fight Islamist extremists shows.

Via Seth Dixon, Michael Miller
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Nathan Chasse's curator insight, March 25, 2014 12:59 PM

Colonial ties are still very prevalent due to Europe's dependence upon the resources of Africa. European countries like England and France invest billions in Africa, not to help those African nations, but to build infrastructure for resource extraction or to keep governments stable. Though the true exploitation of Africa has ended, the current situation certainly has the ring of exploitation as the people of Europe enjoy the diamonds and chocolate harvested by the multitudes of impoverished people of Africa.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 4:04 PM

Colony powers are still located within Africa. Just because Africa is technically independent doesn't mean that British Colonial power isn't still in place.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, September 11, 2014 2:11 PM

unit 4

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Changing Ethnic patterns in London

Changing Ethnic patterns in London | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Of all the changes announced by the 2011 census, one of the most startling is the rapid change in the ethnic composition of London's population.

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Meagan Harpin's curator insight, September 28, 2013 3:39 PM

The most surprising piece of information in this article is that white Britons are leaving London because of the minorities that are moving in. As of 2013 only 59.9% of London was white, meaning that the miniorities are taking over Ethnic part of London much faster then first anticipated.   

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, March 29, 2014 5:43 PM

Since immigrants have flocked into London, it appears some of the White population has left the city because of it. The ethnic change is happening very quickly in London and White British population is no longer the majority. As large numbers of immigrants enter London, large numbers of White people leave the city. London is becoming a melting pot rather quickly. 

 
Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, December 18, 2014 2:40 PM

If white flight is happening in Europe, where are all of its native migrating to? I know for years, there has been a large migrant population from the continent of Africa migrating to Europe, more specifically London, but where in the world could Britain's native be migrating to? Its common to hear of people migrating from rural areas to better neighborhoods, but with the influx of people looking for a better livelihood resemble that of the people living in countries such as India, China and Japan?

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Socket map of the world

Socket map of the world | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Tags: cartography, technology, globalization, historical, regions, mapping, colonialism.
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 17, 2012 3:57 PM

This map might appear to be completely trivial and it probably is.  Still, there are interesting historical and colonial patterns that can be seen in this technological culture region map. 


Questions to Ponder: Will there one day be a single format?  When?  What are barrier to that happening?  What does this tell us about the extent of globalization?

Mr Ortloff's curator insight, July 23, 2013 4:01 PM

You can map ANYTHING!!!

Justin McCullough's curator insight, December 12, 2013 1:36 PM

This map is interesting because it shows where the former British Empire had its influences , especially in British-Africa territories. The only four countries that use the light blue are all in the southern hemisphere as the article points out, and the American model can be largely seen in the western hemisphere, However, there is the American model in Saudi Arabia. It seems that the rest of the world uses the light green or the dark green models. 

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AFRITERRA: Mapping Africa

AFRITERRA: Mapping Africa | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"The AFRITERRA Foundation is a non-profit Cartographic Library and Archive assembling and preserving the original rare maps of Africa in a definitive place for education and interpretation.  This unique cartographic galleries links art, technology, and history."  The Afriterra Foundation connects people to the land, history, heritage and legacy of Africa.


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Latvia votes: Is Russian our language, too?

Latvia votes: Is Russian our language, too? | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Like a detective at a crime scene, chief language inspector Antons Kursitis scans the lobby of a hotel in downtown Riga. He spots a brochure that lists hotel services in Russian only, a flagrant violation of Latvia's language laws.

 

"Protecting the Latvian language — that is, safeguarding its supremacy over Russian — has been a priority here since the Soviet occupation ended two decades ago. Those efforts face their biggest test yet on Saturday, in a referendum on whether to make Russian the country's second official language."  What historical, political and demographic factors shape this cultural issue of language?  Why is language often seen as so crucial to cultural identity?  

 

The Latvian voters have spoken: in a massive voter turn-out, they struck down the referendum that sought to make Russian an official language.  "Latvia is the only place throughout the world where Latvian is spoken, so we have to protect it," said Martins Dzerve, 37, in Riga, Latvia's capital. "But Russian is everywhere."  For more on the vote, see: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-17083397    


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Nicholas Rose's comment, September 4, 2012 11:48 AM
This article is really interesting to read about. The reason why is because of the existence of the Soviet Union during World War II. Each Soviet Republic during that time had their own language and children were taught to speak Russian during school. Since the Soviet Union fell after the Cold War in 1991, all of the former Soviet Republics are free countries now and should be allowed to speak their official language instead of Russian.
Derek Ethier's comment, October 18, 2012 1:14 AM
It is definitely important for Latvians to hold on tightly to their culture. However, the Soviet Union caused Russian culture and language to spread throughout the USSR and countries are feeling the effects today. There are millions of Russians in former satellite nations who hold on to their Russian culture. At the same time, these nations wish to regain their national pride especially after the fall of the Soviet Union. It is a difficult conundrum, but I do agree with the Latvians' decision.
Shanelle Zaino's curator insight, October 15, 2014 8:37 PM

It was interesting to read that in order to become a Latvian citizen you need to speak Latvian.I can see the point of view from both sides.Russian speaking residents want to be treated equally and Latvian citizens want to keep their cultural identity. However it does seem that there may be some deeper issues of discrimination that a unified language may not eliminate completely.

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The Prime Meridian: Natural or Cultural?

The Prime Meridian: Natural or Cultural? | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

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mderder's comment, February 19, 2012 5:04 PM
The system works fine as is. Maybe down the line, when it would be far easier to quickly change the global coordinate system, this thing would be feasible. Now, though, it would needlessly entail a huge amount of labor. Just think of all the PRINTED materials which could cause confusion. You would have to change out EVERY chart on EVERY seagoing vessel in the WORLD. That, all by itself, is an enormous task, and in some areas would be economically prohibitive. Charts are NOT cheap. In the future, when everything is linked up and digital, it would be much easier. Now it would be a disaster. Some people don't think things through.
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The First Grader — Make a Difference

Watch The First Grader trailer and make a difference! For every trailer viewing on YouTube, Capella University will donate $.50* to the following organizatio...

 

The geography of education can provide some heartbreaking as well as heartwarming stories.  This trailer shows the distinction between traditional and popular cultures while highlighting conflicts based on ethnicity and nationalism, all within the post-colonial context in Kenya.


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The Separatist Map of Africa

The Separatist Map of Africa | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
When African states gained independence, the continent's new leaders agreed to respect the old colonial borders to avoid endless wars.

 

This interactive map shows the major conflicts on the African continent where the combatants have geopolitical aspirations to separate from the state and create a new, autonomous state.  Click on the red arrows and you can read about the warring factions and the current situation in that region.   

 

Tags: political, governance, Africa, unit 4 political, war, conflict, states, colonialism.


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Arya Okten's curator insight, March 27, 2014 11:48 PM

Unit IV - Non American

Edelin Espino's curator insight, December 5, 2014 11:04 AM

is sad to see how people just refer to it as "Africa" when every part has its own name. Even myself don't know many of them since they are irrelevant for the western people.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 17, 2014 12:08 AM

This interactive map does a great job of not only showing the sate of political struggles and military conflict within the whole of Africa. This shows the new countries many dissidents  and rebels wish to establish in order to give their people a cultural and ethnic home land. This give a good picture of simply how chaotic some parts of Africa truly are and how destabilized many regions are.