AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO
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The Great Barrier Reef was not bleached naturally

The Great Barrier Reef was not bleached naturally | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"This year, we’ve seen alarming bleaching of the Great Barrier Reef, caused by warm sea temperatures. A recently completed aerial survey of the reef found that 93 percent of the smaller reefs that comprise it showed at least some bleaching, and in the northern sector of the reef, the large majority of reefs saw bleaching that was severe — meaning many of these corals could die.  There was already considerable murmuring that this event, which damages a famous World Heritage site and could deal a blow to a highly valuable tourism industry, did not simply happen by chance. And now, a near real-time analysis by a group of Australian climate and coral reef researchers has affirmed that the extremely warm March sea temperatures in the Coral Sea, which are responsible for the event, were hardly natural."

 

Tags: biogeography, environment, ecology, Australia, Oceania.


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Animals Rule Chernobyl 30 Years After Nuclear Disaster

Animals Rule Chernobyl 30 Years After Nuclear Disaster | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Three decades later, it’s not certain how radiation is affecting wildlife—but it’s clear that animals abound.

 

It may seem strange that Chernobyl, an area known for the deadliest nuclear accident in history, could become a refuge for all kinds of animals—from moose, deer, beaver, and owls to more exotic species like brown bear, lynx, and wolves—but that is exactly what Shkvyria and some other scientists think has happened. Without people hunting them or ruining their habitat, the thinking goes, wildlife is thriving despite high radiation levels.

 

Tags: National Geographic, physical, biogeography, environment, ecology, environment modify, disasters.


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Revisiting Alexander von Humboldt

Revisiting Alexander von Humboldt | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
On why a Prussian scientific visionary should be studied afresh…In a superb biography, Andrea Wulf makes an inspired case for Alexander von Humboldt to be considered the greatest scientist of the 19th century. Certainly he was the last great polymath in a scientific world which, by the time he died in Berlin in 1859, aged 89, was fast hardening into the narrow specializations that typify science to this day. Yet in the English-speaking world, Humboldt is strangely little-known.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 10, 2015 8:28 AM

Alexander von Humboldt has been described as the last great ancient geographer concerned with understanding an eclectic cosmography as well as the first modern geographer. He is honored far and wide throughout Europe and especially  Latin America for his explorations, but given that people are confused as how to categorize him and classify his contributions, today he is under-appreciated.  Geographers need to reclaim his memory and call his extensive, globetrotting work on a wide range of subjects ‘geography.’  Here is another article and TED-ED video on the most influential scientist that you might not have heard of (at least until today).

 

Tags:  historicalbiogeography.

Tony Burton's curator insight, January 29, 11:32 AM

An interesting biography, but, strangely, Ms Wulf almost completely ignores Humboldt's time in Mexico. In some ways, his time in Mexico was more pivotal in terms of geography than his time in South America. Claiming that Humboldt is a virtual unknown in Europe is a gross distortion of the facts; there have been numerous books about Humboldt over the last thirty to forty years, let alone before that time!.

Pieter de Paauw's curator insight, February 15, 6:25 AM

De nieuwe methode van de onderbouw: (Alexander von) Humboldt

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Galapagos Islands and Biodiversity

Galapagos Islands and Biodiversity | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Radiolab wraps 2015 with a series of special episodes.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 5, 2:11 PM

The Galapagos Islands (as are most islands) filled with remarkably distinct species from the mainland--one of the key reasons that the island were so instrumental in shaping Charles Darwin's thinking about evolution.  This environmental Radiolab podcast is mainly about the Galapagos wildlife and it's conservation and covers many important biogeographic concepts (with time in the episode): 

  • Traveling to the Galapagos (5:25)
  • Who will fight to protect the environment? (10:00)
  • Tortoises and their role in habitats (13:30)
  • Invasive Species and goats (16:30)
  • Removal of Invasive species (19:00)
  • The return of the original habitat (25:40)
  • Local anger against conservation (26:30)
  • 'Restoring' extinct tortoise species (30:00)
  • How do we best protect nature? (37:00)
  • Genetically engineering extinct species (41:00)
  • Tourism and ecological change (46:45)
  • Darwin and finches (50:00)
  • Endangered finches and flies (55:00)
  • Hybrid species (1:02:00)

 

Tags: Ecuador, biogeography, environmentecology, historical.

Marianne Naughton's curator insight, January 14, 1:33 PM

Wildlife & Conservation

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The World’s Driest Desert Is in Breathtaking Bloom

The World’s Driest Desert Is in Breathtaking Bloom | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"After historic rains, Atacama, Chile is exploding with vibrant wildflowers.  Here's a softer side to the disruptive weather phenomenon known as El Nino: an enormous blanket of colorful flowers has carpeted Chile's Atacama desert, the most arid in the world. The cyclical warming of the central Pacific may be causing droughts and floods in various parts of the world, but in the vast desert of northern Chile it has also caused a vibrant explosion of thousands of species of flowers with an intensity not seen in decades."


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Pierre Ratcliffe's comment, October 31, 2015 2:56 AM
How life forms have been dormant for decades or centuries or more. The DNA of these plants were there ready when conditions were favourable.
Leonardo Wild's curator insight, October 31, 2015 9:44 AM

Amazing Nature!

Kevin Nguyen's curator insight, November 2, 2015 12:32 PM

Wow! This is such an amazing thing to see happened in the driest place on Earth. The disruptive weather phenomenon, El Nino really made this place come to life by bringing rainfall and floods. A spectacular site to see, that in the most harshest physical environment, life can flourished.

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What would happen if humans became extinct?


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 6, 2014 4:37 PM

What would Earth be like if all humans suddenly disappeared? This question posed on the YouTube series Earth Unplugged, has many intriguing ecological and biogeographic ramifications that are worth considering to explore how systems are interconnected. 


Tags: biogeography, environmentecology, video.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, October 27, 2014 10:29 AM

I find this youtube video interesting but for sure, the planet has become very interconnected with humans but that has not been a postiive effect. Humans have done nothing but manipulate the natural order of the ecosystem. If humans went extinct I would assume the earth would balance its self out.

Norka McAlister's curator insight, January 27, 2015 7:50 PM

It is funny because this video just made me think about TV shows such as The Walking Dead and Z-Nation.  Of course, not for the zombies, but what if some disease might wipe out the human race, and also how the earth will looks like after human extinction. The impact on earth when human life is gone will be catastrophic for domestic animals left behind. The wild animals will become dominant. Many species will also become extinct and a lot of chemicals will poison grounds and infrastructure will collapse with the force of the weather after few years. Although, it is fascinating how humans can preamble the fact that satellite can be worked forever after humans are gone from Earth. It is not only about humans, but also about the Earth that we need to come up with more reasons to be green on the planet. 

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Colombia's Herd of Hungry Hippos

Colombia's Herd of Hungry Hippos | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"A herd of hippopotamuses once owned by the late Colombian drug baron Pablo Escobar has been taking over the countryside near his former ranch - and no-one quite knows what to do with them."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 26, 2014 10:33 PM

An important idea in biogeography is the concept of invasive species. An invasive species is an organism that is not indigenous to an area but causes great economic or environmental harm to the new area as it quickly adapts and alters the ecosystem.   Colombia's hippopotamus herd certainly qualifies as an interesting example to share with students of unintended ecological consequences that occur through human and environmental interactions.  For further explorations into invasive species, see this National Geographic lesson plan.   

 

Tags: biogeography, environmentecology, Colombia, National Geographic.

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, August 1, 2014 6:30 PM

Ecosystem imbalance

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The World's Largest Trees

"The world's second-largest known tree, the President, in Sequoia National Park is photographed by National Geographic magazine photographer Michael 'Nick' Nichols for the December 2012 issue."


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Hemant Galviya's curator insight, April 17, 2014 2:55 AM

hiiiiiiiiiiii

Miroslav Sopko's curator insight, April 18, 2014 11:44 AM

Najväčšie stromy sveta.

Basant Kerketta's curator insight, April 21, 2014 4:26 AM

Magnificent !!!

These kind must be saved.

Wish I could plant and replicate this size and height here in my home town.

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Island Biogeography

Part I, island biogeography in a World Regional context...click here to watch part II, why island biogeography matters in places that aren't on islands.  archived at: http://geographyeducation.org/2013/12/06/island-biogeography/


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Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, May 4, 2015 12:35 PM

There are times where I wish certain species don't spread.  Other times I understand the migration and think it's great.  If humans died out then I believe all species would flourish just as Sir Ken Robinson says.  

Corine Ramos's curator insight, December 8, 2015 8:19 PM

Island biogeography operates on different principles than we see on the continents.  Soem extraordinary creatures such as the komodo dragon and thylacine can be found in isolated places removed interactions with more generalist species.  Alfred Russel Wallace made some extraordinary discoveries combining biology and spatial thinking. 

 

Island biogeography is pertinent today since habitat fragmentation (from urbanization and argicultural land uses) has rendered 'islands' out of the wilderness that isn't being used by humanity.  Some animals such as the cougar are locally extinct from their historic ranges (extirpation).


Tags: biogeography, environment, ecology, Australia, Oceania.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 11:06 PM
Island Biogeography is the theoretical explanations as to why species occurs, it also studies the species composition and species richness on an island.. it is not specific to land masses around water. Isolation gives species a strong place in their environment. The fact that new species and things show up are amazing, but sometimes new species are not properly adapted because there is no other general force against them and they do not ever learn to defend themselves.
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This Pulsing Earth

This Pulsing Earth | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Spring comes, then summer, fall and winter and if you are off the planet with a camera looking down at Earth, the seasons seem like breaths. Speed up the imagery, and the planet seems to pulse, like a living thing.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 15, 2013 11:00 AM

I'm sorry that this site cannot display the animated GIF version, but just follow the link to see how the seasonal rthymns of the climate and biomass pulsate (at a much slower rate than our bodies, but still a system with it's ebbs and flows).  


Tags: physical, remote sensing, geospatial, biogeography, weather and climate, Arctic.

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Earth's Green Places Mapped

"Although 75% of the planet is a relatively unchanging ocean of blue, the remaining 25% of Earth's surface is a dynamic green. Data from the NASA/NOAA Suomi NPP satellite is able to detect these subtle differences in greenness. The resources on this page highlight our ever-changing planet, using highly detailed vegetation index data from the satellite, developed by scientists at NOAA. The darkest green areas are the lushest in vegetation, while the pale colors are sparse in vegetation cover either due to snow, drought, rock, or urban areas. Satellite data from April 2012 to April 2013 was used to generate these animations and images."


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Louis Culotta's curator insight, July 16, 2013 5:05 PM

This is something to check out if you want to see first hand look at the green and not so green places on our planet. It really makes you see the parts of the world that get enough rain and the areas that don't that makes what we see from Satellite images from space.

Magnus Gustafsson's curator insight, July 16, 2013 5:13 PM

Useful insiight how we humans can change the world!

Al Picozzi's comment, July 18, 2013 11:19 AM
Can really see the effect of development in the Amazon river basin. Also this system can be a great use to help in areas that are facing a drought.
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#deextinction


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 16, 2013 11:26 PM

De-extinction is a new term for to me but this week a TEDx conference hosted by National Geographic focused completely on this concept on the possibility of reviving formerly extinct species. Just because we think we can bring back a lost species, does that mean we should?  What would be the benefits?  Disadvantages? 


I've read enough about passenger pigeons to know that beyond overhunting, the species went extinct as large swaths of North American forests became fragmented and modified.  While we may be able to theoretically bring back a species, we cannot rewind the clock and bring all the essential ingredients to their former ecosystem that allowed them to thrive in the first place.  De-extinction would NOT be repairing the world so that it was as if the extinction never happened, since other species in the ecosystem have adapted to their absence. Given the length of their absence, could these be considered "invasive species?"     


Tags: biogeography, environment, National Geographic, environment modify, ecology, historical, TED.

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The Top Ten places to visit in Africa

The Top Ten places to visit in Africa | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Africa has a lot to offer the adventurous traveller. We've compiled a list of the must-see places any trip should include.

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Giselle Figueroa's curator insight, November 4, 2014 11:00 PM

 Even though their is a bad situation going on in some parts of Africa, we can not discount the beautiful places  in this beautiful continent. I really love the ten places, but there was three places which I will love to go some day. The first one is Victoria Falls in Zambia is a beautiful place I love it, its looks like The Niagara falls but much better. The second one is Valley of the kings in Egypt, this place is an ancient place, very interesting. The last one is Cape Town in South Africa, this is an amazing place, it have beautiful beaches, the nature in there is awesome, and I could read that has great cuisine. Definitely is in my plans to go someday.

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 11, 2014 8:37 PM

I have never been outside of the country. Although I would really love to visit a country in each continent before I die. Being a huge Disney fan, all that comes to mind when I think of Africa is The Lion King. However, the top places ranked on this website were just as beautiful. A must see for me would be The Maasai Mara located in Kenya. It looks like a replica of the opening scene in The Lion King. Another beautiful sight to see would be Mount Kilimanjaro. I'm not sure I would make it to the top, but even seeing it from a distance looks like a breath-taking view. Number one on this top places to visit list was Cape Town, which consisted of beaches, food, and amazing scenery. Sounds perfect for a relaxing day!

Lena Minassian's curator insight, April 8, 2015 1:11 PM

I liked this article because a lot of times, many indivduals do not realize that there are many great places to visit in Africa. Africa has a big stereotype of just having poor countries and not having much to see visually. This articles shows the top ten places to see if you travel there and these images are beyong beautiful. If you like to travel this is definetly something that you should look at. Geographically, there are mountains. rain foreswt, craters, pyramids, and towns you can visit. Africa is a big continent and one of my favorite images that I saw was Mt. Kilimanjaro and Virunga Mountains.

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von Humboldt: The Invention of Nature

"Andrea Wulf's new book The Invention of Nature reveals the extraordinary life of the visionary German naturalist Alexander von Humboldt (1769-1859) and how he created the way we understand nature today. Though almost forgotten today, his name lingers everywhere from the Humboldt Current to the Humboldt penguin. Humboldt was an intrepid explorer and the most famous scientist of his age. Perceiving nature as an interconnected global force, Humboldt discovered similarities between climate zones across the world and predicted human-induced climate change. Wulf traces Humboldt’s influences through the great minds he inspired in revolution, evolution, ecology, conservation, art and literature.  In The Invention of Nature Wulf brings this lost hero to science and the forgotten father of environmentalism back to life."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 19, 4:30 PM

Alexander von Humboldt has been described as the last great ancient geographer concerned with understanding an eclectic cosmography as well as the first modern geographer. He is honored far and wide throughout Europe and especially  Latin America for his explorations, but given that people are confused as how to categorize him and classify his contributions, today he is under-appreciated.  Geographers need to reclaim his memory and call his extensive, globetrotting work on a wide range of subjects ‘geography.’  Here are more articles and videos on the man that I feel geographers should publicly champion as their intellectual ancestor the way that biologists point to Darwin.  

 

Tags:  historicalbiogeography, book reviews.

Bonnie Bracey Sutton's curator insight, April 30, 11:55 PM
A Great Book to Read " The Invention of Nature"
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It's official: a global mass extinction is under way

It's official: a global mass extinction is under way | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"New research confirms that the next mass extinction is in progress, and we’re the cause. There’s been little doubt that humans have been severely altering the planet and reducing biodiversity, but it has been unclear how many species go extinct under normal circumstances, without human influence.

This new research clarifies the rate of 'background extinction' (the rate of extinction during the point before humans became a primary contributor to extinction). The research confirms that human activity is driving species extinct at a rate far higher than the background rate. A look at previous events suggests cause for concern. Geologists recognize five previous mass extinction events— the end of the Ordovician, Devonian, Permian, Triassic, and Cretaceous periods, meaning that we’re now in the 6th."

 

Tags: physical, biogeography, environment, ecology, environment modify, sustainability, geology.


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Ivan Ius's curator insight, February 28, 7:03 PM

Geographic Thinking Concepts: Patterns and Trends; Interrelationships;

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Skellig Michael: An Island Far, Far Away

Skellig Michael: An Island Far, Far Away | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"Star Wars Epiosde VII was filmed on Skellig Michael island in Ireland. What better place to depict an ancient, mystical, martial asceticism in a galaxy far, far away than an actual ancient eremitic settlement, dripping with stone-cold monastic austerity, located at what was for centuries the very ends of the earth, seven miles off the very tip of a western Irish peninsula?"


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 2, 12:45 PM

This island is dripping with geologic, biogeographical, and religious intrigue that makes this world heritage site a place that is shrouded in mystery.  This article from JSTOR Daily is a great introduction to the island for the incurably curious.  The already vibrant tourism industry is bound to increase after Star Wars used this incredible location in the recent film (much like New Zealand experienced a huge spike in tourism after the Lord the Rings films).  Filmmakers understand the power of place to deepen the narrative; they frequently situate their stories in a geographic context that will heighten the emotional impact of the story.  For more on the dramatic locations of Star Wars filming sites, see this article by National Geographic

 

Tags: geologybiogeography, religionChristianityplaceIreland, tourism.

J. Mark Schwanz's curator insight, January 4, 10:33 AM

Skellig Michael is sure to become a more common geographical interest since the success of Star Wars. 

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Living Bridges

"In Northeast India just north of Bangladesh is the province of Meghalaya."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 9, 2015 4:44 PM

The living bridges of Meghalaya are truly sights to behold; these astonishing bridges are a natural way that local people have adapted to an incredibly flood-prone environment.  The organic building materials prevent erosion and keep people in contact during times of flood.  Here is another video and articles (BBC, Atlas Obscura, Inhabitat, and MNN) with more ecological and cultural context on these living bridges. 


Tags: environment, environment adapt, SouthAsia, water, weather climate, indigenousbiogeography.

Tanya Townsend's curator insight, November 20, 2015 4:16 PM

I think these bridges are of great value to the world... Nature provides us with such amazing natural resources. There is really no need to do half the damage we do to it. what a beautiful way to keep the environment's natural beauty intacted

 

Kimmy Jay's curator insight, November 20, 2015 6:28 PM

H/E Interaction 

 

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How Wolves Change Rivers

"When wolves were reintroduced to Yellowstone National Park in the United States after being absent nearly 70 years, the most remarkable 'trophic cascade' occurred. What is a trophic cascade and how exactly do wolves change rivers?"


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 6, 2015 11:53 AM

When a complex system gets one aspect of it changed, there are many other changes that occur, some of which are nearly impossible to envision beforehand.  Here is some Oregon State research on the changes in Yellowstone's ecosystems and physical environments since the introduction of wolves. 


Tagsecology, biogeography, environment, environment adapt, physical, fluvial.

Maricarmen Husson's curator insight, February 7, 2015 11:56 PM

AMAZING!

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Alexander von Humboldt

"Have you heard of Alexander von Humboldt? Not likely. The geologist turned geographer and South American explorer was a bit of an 18th century super scientist, traveling over 24,000 miles to understand the relationship between nature and habitat. George Mehler details Humboldt’s major accomplishments and why we should care about them today. See this TED ED lesson plan that accompanies the video."


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Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 16, 2014 6:39 PM

I had not heard of Alexander Von Humbboldt before watching this video. He is said to be one of the most amazing scientists to ever live. More places around the world have been named after him than any other person. His name was lost in history so this is why many people are not familiar with him. He started off as a geologist, then he began a scientific five year journey from 1799-1804. His journey was long, dangerous at some times, and very interesting to hear about. He travel through mountains, across oceans, and through villages. For one thing, he was the first explorer to witness preparation of the curare plant, which was used for poison arrows. He recognized the importance of the cinchona tree, who's bark contains quinine, a malaria killer. He also discovered the ocean current which eliminates rainfall on the coast of Peru. To record air pressure, he climbed to the top of one of the tallest volcanoes, Mount Chimborazo. His total journey consisted of about 2400 miles, which is reality is equal to the circumference of the Earth.

Danielle Lip's curator insight, February 10, 2015 8:42 PM

This video was quite interesting because I had never heard of Alexander von Humboldt, yet this great scientist founded many different important facts that are beneficial and helped to find with the preparation of the Curare Plant which is in poisonous arrows and discovered the ocean current on South America. Without Humboldt South America might have been at a lose for some objects and geographical information. Everyone has an impact in geography and geology, yet Humboldt helped to create contour maps which happened different patterns, everyone builds off of others ideas. 

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, March 5, 2015 3:58 PM

Nope, never heard of him.  Humboldt did some extraordinary things though.  I'm surprised we don't hear more about him in education.  I've definitely heard of Darwin though.  It's interesting what we decide is relevant or who is relevant in history.  

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Colombia's Herd of Hungry Hippos

Colombia's Herd of Hungry Hippos | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"A herd of hippopotamuses once owned by the late Colombian drug baron Pablo Escobar has been taking over the countryside near his former ranch - and no-one quite knows what to do with them."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 26, 2014 10:33 PM

An important idea in biogeography is the concept of invasive species. An invasive species is an organism that is not indigenous to an area but causes great economic or environmental harm to the new area as it quickly adapts and alters the ecosystem.   Colombia's hippopotamus herd certainly qualifies as an interesting example to share with students of unintended ecological consequences that occur through human and environmental interactions.  For further explorations into invasive species, see this National Geographic lesson plan.   

 

Tags: biogeography, environmentecology, Colombia, National Geographic.

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, August 1, 2014 6:30 PM

Ecosystem imbalance

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The world's oldest living tree

The world's oldest living tree | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
At 4,841 years old, this ancient bristlecone pine is the oldest known non-clonal organism on Earth. Located in the White Mountains of California, in Inyo National Forest, Methuselah's exact location is kept a close secret in order to protect it from the public. (An older specimen named Prometheus, which was about 4,900 years old, was cut down by a researcher in 1964 with the U.S. Forest Service's permission.) Today you can visit the grove where Methuselah hides, but you'll have to guess at which tree it is. Could this one be it?

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 31, 2014 2:44 PM

I freely admit that I have a strange fascination with the twists and turns in a majestic tree; I find that they are great reminders of the wonders and beauty to be found on Earth. 


Tags: biogeography, environmentecology, historical, California.

Beatrice Do's curator insight, January 31, 2014 3:40 PM

the exact location is kept a close secret O_O

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, February 5, 2014 7:17 PM

After reading this article, I am pleased to know that the world oldest non-clonal organism is located in California. It is amazing that a tree could still stand after almost 5,000 years. Hopefully, people do not destroy this tree, as it is fascinating. 

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The Great Nature Project

The Great Nature Project | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Join me and National Geographic's Great Nature Project in exploring the great nature all around us!

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Tracy Klug's curator insight, September 30, 2013 3:07 PM

Join me in submitting pictures to National Geographic's Great Nature Project!  You could submit them to me personally so that I can show the images to my Human Geography students!

Molly Diallo's curator insight, September 30, 2013 5:52 PM

I am requesting you do this and send me a copy of your pictures as well!

 

Janet Price's curator insight, October 1, 2013 6:41 PM

Something for that class set of cameras!

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Mountain Fire: Natural Hazards

Mountain Fire: Natural Hazards | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
On July 18, 2013, a fierce wildfire threatened Palm Springs, California.

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Al Picozzi's comment, July 20, 2013 3:58 PM
Alot of fire going on out west. Check out the NASA site http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/fires/main/index.html that shows them from a satellite view of the various fires.
Louis Culotta's curator insight, July 21, 2013 3:48 PM

I think this shows that the weather has entered into a world of extremes of very hot or very cold, wet or dry and not to much of regular seasonal changes of the past typical patterns.

It shows that with general warmer ocean temps, has lead to this new type of weather patterns resulting from global warming. 

Josue Maroquin's comment, August 12, 2013 9:20 PM
When we are liviing in a hot and dry climate we are bound to face more devastating fires accident made or not
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Maple Syrup Time

Maple Syrup Time | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

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Louis Culotta's comment, April 8, 2013 11:45 AM
this is cool. A friend of mine bought all the equipment and is making it in the woods in his backyard up in Cumberland.
Mary Burke's comment, April 12, 2013 3:53 PM
When I get pancakes at a restaurant I always ask for real maple syrup. They charge more but its worth it. I venture to say that the Canadian maple syrup subsidies might have something to do with less syrup production around here and also might be why syrup so expensive.
Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, December 6, 2013 11:53 AM

I actually made maple syrup about a year ago, a couple of roads away from my house.  I know a family that makes it every year, and I was invited to come join them harvesting the syrup.  I had done it there many years ago, but I had a blast.  The father of a guy I went to school with was there boiling the sap, and we had a lot of interesting discussions about the process, including the importance of the climate.  Apparently, if I remember correctly, it is vital to have the freezing temperatures, followed by warm days- which is also mentioned in the article.  He said that gets the "blood" of the tree pumping, and greatly increases the syrup production.  I got to taste the sap as it was being boiled down to concentrated levels, and it was amazing.  I think that using natural resources like that is really cool.  I had a great time, and know that it takes a LOT of sap to make very LITTLE syrup, but it can be totally worth it. I enjoyed gardening when my family had a garden, and I think that that sort of natural harvest and refinement for consumption can be immensely entertaining, as well as rewarding.  I know this family usually makes enough for themselves, and that they give a little away, and end up having enough to get through the year.  It is a really enjoyable activity, and I reccommend it to anyone that doesn't mind getting cold outside or covered in tree sap.

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At National Geographic Headquarters


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 27, 2013 3:58 PM

Today I've been at the the National Geographic headquarters in Washington D.C. with other Geography Education Alliance coordinators.  They have the coolest toys to capture some amazing footage, including crittercams.  

Jonathan Lemay's curator insight, March 7, 2013 10:54 AM

Seen one of these used on mt washington to get aerial footage of people on the summit.