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Feeding the Whole World

"Louise Fresco argues that a smart approach to large-scale, industrial farming and food production will feed our planet's incoming population of nine billion. Only foods like (the scorned) supermarket white bread, she says, will nourish on a global scale."


Via Seth Dixon, Mary Rack
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Marianne Naughton's curator insight, October 19, 12:07 PM

Feed The World ...

dilaycock's curator insight, October 19, 6:45 PM

Fresco argues that we tend to see "home-made" agriculture as a thing of beauty, whereas the reality is that many small scale farmers struggle and live a subsistence lifestyle. The adoration of small-scale farming, notes Fresco, is a luxury to those who can afford it. Large-scale production has increased the availability and affordability of food. Food production should be given as high a priority as climate change and sustainability, and we should seriously consider ways in which land can be used as a multi-purpose space that includes agriculture.

Stephen Zimmett's curator insight, October 24, 10:55 AM

Louise Fresco speaks of local food production and small scale control

and the entire food nework

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The Awful Reign of the Red Delicious

The Awful Reign of the Red Delicious | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"For at least 70 years, the Red Delicious has dominated apple production in the United States. But since the turn of the 21st century, as the market has filled with competitors—the Gala, the Fuji, the Honeycrisp—its lead has been narrowing. Annual output has plunged."


Via Seth Dixon, Jodi Esaili
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 23, 2:05 PM

The story of the Red Delicious is almost a perfect analogy for the food industry.  It was genetically selected for its marketable skin, an aesthetically sumptuous red.  The skin of the Red Delicious better covers bruises than other varieties and tastes more bitter.  Consumers were buying what the industry promoted and “eating with their eyes and not their mouths.”  But recently there has been a backlash in the United States and more American consumer are seeking out other varieties; meanwhile the apple producers are working on exporting this variety to around the world, but especially into Chinese markets.  


Tags: agriculture, food production, food distribution, agribusiness, USA

Linda Alexander's curator insight, September 25, 10:33 AM

I believe this is the rotten tasting apple that comes with your meals at Panera. 

Jennifer Brown's curator insight, September 29, 12:40 PM

I loved this article for so many reasons! One who doesn't love an old man who sticks it to the grocery store managers? Two this is a perfect example of what humans do to everything they touch. To munipulate an apples genetics so much that it no longer exists? Seriously? What ever happen to if it aint broke don't fix it? This is also the prime example of how we are as a society. As long as everything is shiny and pretty on the outside don't worry about the inside. Red Delicious apples have a nice attractive outside but the inside is usually blah..

 

I'll stick to my Honeycrisps!

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'The Great Fish Swap': How America Is Downgrading Its Seafood Supply

'The Great Fish Swap': How America Is Downgrading Its Seafood Supply | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"One-third of the seafood Americans catch is sold abroad, but most of the seafood we eat here is imported and often of lower quality. Why? Author Paul Greenberg says it has to do with American tastes."


Via Seth Dixon, LEONARDO WILD
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 9, 8:00 PM

The United States exports the best-quality seafood that Americans catch, but import primarily low-grade aquacultural products.  This is just one of the counter-intuitive issues withe U.S. fish consumption and production.  This bizarre dynamic has cultural and economic explanations and this NPR podcast nicely explains these spatial patterns that are bound to frustrate those that advocate for locally sourced food productions. 


Tagsfood production, industry, food, agriculture, agribusinessconsumptioneconomic, sustainability.

HazelAnne Prescott's curator insight, July 31, 10:56 AM

Seems like a messed up system.  We do not have "taste"

Abigail Mack's curator insight, July 31, 11:27 AM

What would make Americans opt for the lower quality, imported fish?

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China’s hungry cattle feasting on alfalfa grown on Utah farm

China’s hungry cattle feasting on alfalfa grown on Utah farm | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
China has long depended on the U.S. breadbasket, importing up to $26 billion in U.S. agricultural products yearly. But increasingly, Chinese investors aren’t just buying from farms abroad. They’re buying the farms.

Via Seth Dixon, diane gusa
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Stephen Zimmett's curator insight, July 7, 10:41 AM
strong>Seth Dixon's insight: China buying farm land
MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 7:06 PM

APHG-U5

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 7:15 PM

APHG-U5

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Ramen To The Rescue: How Instant Noodles Fight Global Hunger

Ramen To The Rescue: How Instant Noodles Fight Global Hunger | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
The supercheap and palatable noodles help low-wage workers around the world get by, anthropologists argue in a new book. And rather than lament the ascendance of this highly processed food, they argue we should try to make it more nutritious.

Via Seth Dixon, ApocalypseSurvival
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Steven Flis's curator insight, December 17, 2013 12:10 PM

Its pretty crazy to think something as simple as ramen noodles can help feed billions of people. in the western world iramen is the butt currently for running jokes about poor college kids, i never thought it would have this impact. I can now say that ramen is a nessicty in some areas. Who cares about the slight health affects because if some of this people didnt have ramen they would already be dead from starvation. 

Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, December 17, 2013 6:32 PM

I think everyone has had ramen noodles at some point in there life. I do enjoy ramen noodles here and there but couldn't eat it daily. I have found in some of my cookbooks they use ramen noodles in their recipes. It is mostly the quick and easy recipes.  if we are the 6th highest country that purchases ramen noodles I am convinced everyone eats it. 

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 26, 3:12 PM

I am sure almost every person in this country has eaten instant noodles at one point in their life. Due to the fact they are very cheap and enjoyable. Today, many impoverished people all over the world eat these instant noodles, as they are economical. Although they are not a nutritious, they can temporarily relieve people’s hunger.

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McDonald’s® Packaging

McDonald’s® Packaging | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

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Shelby Porter's curator insight, November 4, 2013 10:34 AM

It is sad that so much foods gets wasted all the time because it doesn't look appealing to buyers. Just because some potaoe is shaped funny or is a little darker or lighter than what is considered "normal", it is thrown away. To me, that is ridiculous when so many people are starving around the world. Or that these imperfect foods are given to animals for consumption. Why is it acceptable to animals to eat bad food when we are going to eat those animals? Somewhere down the line of history, the way we view food has been changed and not for the better. If we want to be able to sustain ourselves and this world for many more centuries, we need to revalute how we look at food. 

Courtney Burns's curator insight, November 7, 2013 9:58 AM

I have eaten McDonalds fries and bunch of times and never thought about what 'golden standard" actually meant. McDonalds like it says in the article is one of the top potoate buyers in the world. I'm sure most other fast food places aren' too far behind. However since McDonalds is one of the top buyers of potatoes farmers much make sure they produce enough of the potatoes that McDonalds sells. However it doesn't stop there. Not only do farmers have to produce enough potatoes, but they have to produce quality potatoes. All of McDonalds fries look exactly the same. You never really get a french fry that looks extremely different. That is done on purpose. McDonalds only purchases potatoes that meet their "golden standard". This makes you think how much goes to watste. Farmers are probably discarding "bad" potatoes all the time that don't meet the "golden standard". Does it really matter what the fries look like, if they taste the same? There are people in the world who are hungry, yet we waste food like this all the time. I really don't think it is that big of a deal if not every french fry looks exactly the same. We should make an attempt at trying to limit our food waste. 

Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, November 29, 2013 5:42 PM

Fries are the essential food that everyone enjoys in the world. But it is a good thing because if a potato has a growth defect probably that would affect someone and that is a law suit waiting to happen. In the United States people love suing for anything that they could probably win and receive money. The fries are delicious but they are so fattening that could really effect people if they have any issues with there health. 

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Can Milk Sweetened With Aspartame Still Be Called Milk?

Can Milk Sweetened With Aspartame Still Be Called Milk? | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
By adding artificial sweeteners to flavored milk, the dairy industry hopes to boost flagging consumption in schools.

Via Seth Dixon
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Kev Richards's curator insight, March 8, 2013 2:57 PM

Good example of how a real food turns into an artificial variation of a real food. Shame that kids don't even like milk! That's the parents fault. All kids like milk from birth (of course) so what turns them off?

Courtney Burns's curator insight, November 21, 2013 9:49 AM

In my opinion I believe that the milk companies are trying to add sweeteners to their products in order to increase sales. So many drinks now are containing such things as aspertame. However I don't agree with putting it in a childs milk unless it is made known. I understand the milk company's argument that no one else has to put it on the front of the label, but I think that is because those products were not known to be made without aspartame so most people consuming the product would check. However in order for milk to keep up with competitors it has to take a step in the direction of adding sweeteners to their products. However I think they should have to state artificial sweeteners on the front of the product if it is still called milk. However if they change the name to something other than milk then I would say it would be fair to put artificial sweeteners on the back. Kids comsume drinks all the time with artificial sweeteners, so I still think milk would have sales if people knew there were artificia sweeteners in the milk. But trying to hide it is unfair. People should be made known what they are consuming in their milk, especially since it has been around for so long and is considered a healthy choice for kids. Lastly I think if such a product is put in schools that kids should have the choice between regular old fashion milk and the artificially sweetened milk. 

Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 12, 2013 12:14 AM

Foods we eat in our society today are rarely freshly grown without using some type of chemical. Everything we eat and drink has been processed to taste a certain way and last longer. By sweetening milks children will want it more because it tastes better but it technically is not real milk if it has added sugars. 

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What You Need to Know About Genetically Engineered Food

What You Need to Know About Genetically Engineered Food | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Myths and facts about health, corruption, and saving the world

Tags: food, agriculture, agribusiness, locavore, unit 5 agriculture.


Via Seth Dixon
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Zakary Pereira's comment, April 30, 2013 4:04 PM
An interesting article to read, it talked about the genetically modified seeds and food that is created by companies and then grown by American and other farmers worldwide. This article relates to the globalization point that we talked about in class. The seeds are genetically modified here or elsewhere in the world and then sent to farmers all over the globe to grow for increased profit typically. Many countries around the world, especially third world countries, have food shortages and by genetically modifying food so that farmers can get a bigger harvest, more people will be fed and less would die to famine and malnutrition. Like David, I tried to keep an open mind and not choose a side while I was reading. The article did seem quite vague regarding argument points however it gave facts left and right which I found to be new to me and fairly interesting, learning that 70% of food that we eat has at least one GE ingredient. Time will tell if this has prolonged pros/cons I suppose.
Gregory S Sankey Jr.'s curator insight, October 24, 2013 1:41 PM

I love the hard facts that this article presents, in a very unbiased way. I've heard many claims from 'both sides of the aisle' about GE crops, but have never in one article seen such a clear and concise representation on the actual truths (or myths) surrounding the GMO debate.  

Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, November 27, 2013 4:59 PM

I mentioned this through an allusion in another article, but GMOs and the movements against them perplex me.  I don't think that fossil-fuel burning engines are natural, but many anti GMO people that claim they are bad for the environment leave me completely stunned as to their intolerance for what could possibly  benefit other people.  I feel very much an outsider when I examine many topics of controversy related to GMOs, and I am quite sure that I have consumed them before -- and loved them?  as for the FDA... I don't approve of the FDA.  They like more money coming into their pocket more than bettered well-being of citizens.  When I mentioned to my doctor that I wanted to apply for medical marijuana for a series of conditions that I have following a severe accident, I was told that they refused because it was not fully endorsed, approved, or even allowed by the FDA.  That really pissed me off because I suffer from excruciating pain every day and night of my life.  Could you imagine being a poor person in need of food, and the only viable way of getting food was through the production of GMOs...? and then some pseudo-hippie activists that didn't live through the 1960s trying to be all like, "We don't want anyone to have GMOs!"... I pose that abstractly, because I view most everything with a level of abstraction and distance from the situation, sampling perspectives with which I may empathize or consider.  I keep thinking that this world around us all came from a big bang, with other possible universes before that, and something  before that... and I really can't see Capitalism ever becoming as bad as it is, with such disregard for other people's wellbeing, until I look at today's world.

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A hard look at corn economics — and world hunger

A hard look at corn economics — and world hunger | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Corn is not what you think. For starters: Most of the time, it's not human food.

Via Seth Dixon
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Rachael Johns's curator insight, October 24, 10:17 AM

The corn we are growing is not helping world hunger but is making the world more unhealthy. Most the corn that we grow is either going to be used as sweeteners or as feed for cows. When we feed this to the cows it is literally killing the cows that WE eat.

Nolan Walters's curator insight, October 25, 11:29 AM

Most of the corn is not even going to us. Most of it goes to the animals, who eat it (which is cheaper than grass), which fatten them up for slaughter for humans.  Corn also gets turned into Corn Syrup, which fattens us.  The Corn industry is mostly to fatten up animals for meat for us humans in MDCs. 

Alex Lewis's curator insight, October 30, 12:46 PM

The fact that we could use this land to grow surplus edible food instead of corn that isn't edible and goes to feed obese and unhealthy cows is sickening. There are millions of people dying in Africa and other LDC's from starvation, but we use our farmland to grow inedible corn and overfeed cows to the point of death. The corn is used to feed animals, and the animals are then slaughtered months, weeks or even days before they would've died of overfeeding. 

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EU debates biopiracy law to protect indigenous people

EU debates biopiracy law to protect indigenous people | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Pharmaceutical companies would need to compensate indigenous people for using their knowhow in creating new medicines

Via Seth Dixon
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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, August 25, 10:16 AM

new vocabulary for us all and unit 5!

MsPerry's curator insight, August 25, 3:27 PM

APHG-Unit 4

Shawn Wright's curator insight, September 7, 8:20 AM

The  Nagoya protocol is an international biological diversity convention. The protocol would at it's core require permission, acknowledgment of source knowledge  or practice and compensation for the use of cultural wisdom.


i don't see Nagoya as a perfect solution - there is a lot of room for language interpretation so slick corporate lawyers will find ways to legally cheat indigenous peoples from their share but I do see it as at least A small step in the right direction.   


The World Health Organisation estimates that 4 billion people, 80% of the world's population, use herbal medicine in primary healthcare. 


Cherokees Believe and have practiced healing from plant and water for thousands of years. Every and any human sickness has a plant who can cure it. Every plant in the world has a purpose if we but learn to hear and understand what that is - there are no weeds to the Cherokee.


Yona Shawn

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The Last Drop: America's Breadbasket Faces Dire Water Crisis

The Last Drop: America's Breadbasket Faces Dire Water Crisis | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Editor's note: This story is one in a series on a crisis in America's Breadbasket –the depletion of the Ogallala Aquifer and its effects on a region that hel...

Via Seth Dixon, Kevin Barker
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Linda Denty's curator insight, July 24, 6:46 PM

Could this happen in Australia also?

Jamie Strickland's curator insight, July 25, 10:46 AM

Thanks to my good friend, Seth Dixon for the original scoop.  There had been quite a bit of news reporting on the drought in central California this year, but this midwestern region has been experiencing water stress for years with little national attention.  I plan to use this article in both an upcoming presentation as well as an example when I teach "Tragedy of the Commons" in my Environmental Dilemma class.

Kate Buckland's curator insight, July 26, 10:32 PM

Good to compare to how we use water resources in Australia

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Chipotle's Gamble

"Watch The Scarecrow, the companion film for Chipotle's new app-based game. Then download the free app at www.scarecrowgame.com and join the quest for whole sustainable food."


Via Seth Dixon
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Alison D. Gilbert's curator insight, October 16, 2013 7:48 AM

Sounds good. I liked the video I saw.

Liam Michelsohn's curator insight, October 21, 2013 7:27 PM

If the Owners of Chipotle are actually growing and raising their animals organically they have no choice but to approach their competitors aggressively.  Growing high volume quality food is a much more expensive and slow process then genetically modifying animals to create higher yields. I thought the commercial was beautifully done and struck a tone I wish I heard more often. 

Shelby Porter's curator insight, November 4, 2013 10:29 AM

This video probably set some of the leading fast food chains and restuarants on edge. Chipotle is starting an organic agricultural revolution, and with good reason. Most fast food cooperations are like the scare crow foods in the video, not using one hundred percent animal products, and using chemicals to enhance them. It is like that in other places too. Mnay farmers now are breeding chickens to have much larger breasts because that is what is in demand. But none of this is good for our bodies. Chipotle is one of many organic companies trying to go back to the basics and feed us food that is also good for us. They are showing us that this agricultural revolution can feed the people of the world. 

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This little piggy is going to China

This little piggy is going to China | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

This photoblog will also link you to a full article and video that explains how the American pork industry is supplying China's demand for protein as globalization forces (among others) has led the Chinese consumers to eat 10% more meat than they did just 5 years ago.  WHat impact will this have on American agriculture?  How to we explain fo the rise in meat demand in China?    


Via Seth Dixon, Julie Nguyen
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Adrian Bahan (MNPS)'s curator insight, March 7, 2013 8:28 PM

Read the linked article. How is China dealing with its increasing appitite for meat?

Paige McClatchy's curator insight, December 14, 2013 5:30 PM

Chinese farmers cannot keep with with Chinese demand from pork, so America is stepping in to fill the gap. The globalization of American pork seems like it would benefit American farmers and Chinese consumers, but the environmental cost of raising so many extra pigs on American land must be considered, as well as transportation costs to ship it to China.

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McDonald’s® Packaging

McDonald’s® Packaging | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
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Shelby Porter's curator insight, November 4, 2013 10:34 AM

It is sad that so much foods gets wasted all the time because it doesn't look appealing to buyers. Just because some potaoe is shaped funny or is a little darker or lighter than what is considered "normal", it is thrown away. To me, that is ridiculous when so many people are starving around the world. Or that these imperfect foods are given to animals for consumption. Why is it acceptable to animals to eat bad food when we are going to eat those animals? Somewhere down the line of history, the way we view food has been changed and not for the better. If we want to be able to sustain ourselves and this world for many more centuries, we need to revalute how we look at food. 

Courtney Burns's curator insight, November 7, 2013 9:58 AM

I have eaten McDonalds fries and bunch of times and never thought about what 'golden standard" actually meant. McDonalds like it says in the article is one of the top potoate buyers in the world. I'm sure most other fast food places aren' too far behind. However since McDonalds is one of the top buyers of potatoes farmers much make sure they produce enough of the potatoes that McDonalds sells. However it doesn't stop there. Not only do farmers have to produce enough potatoes, but they have to produce quality potatoes. All of McDonalds fries look exactly the same. You never really get a french fry that looks extremely different. That is done on purpose. McDonalds only purchases potatoes that meet their "golden standard". This makes you think how much goes to watste. Farmers are probably discarding "bad" potatoes all the time that don't meet the "golden standard". Does it really matter what the fries look like, if they taste the same? There are people in the world who are hungry, yet we waste food like this all the time. I really don't think it is that big of a deal if not every french fry looks exactly the same. We should make an attempt at trying to limit our food waste. 

Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, November 29, 2013 5:42 PM

Fries are the essential food that everyone enjoys in the world. But it is a good thing because if a potato has a growth defect probably that would affect someone and that is a law suit waiting to happen. In the United States people love suing for anything that they could probably win and receive money. The fries are delicious but they are so fattening that could really effect people if they have any issues with there health. 

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EU horse meat scandal exposes dangers of globalism

EU horse meat scandal exposes dangers of globalism | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
When horse meat was discovered in beef hamburgers in Ireland last month, governments, corporations and regulators assured a panicked public that it was complete

 

Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, unit 5 agriculture, globalization, agribusiness.


Via Seth Dixon
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chris tobin's comment, February 28, 2013 3:44 PM
Yes the industry is all about money. The US needs to change their ways, especially in the beef and poultry business. Its mass production, inhumane to animals, and unhealthy .
Adrian Bahan (MNPS)'s curator insight, March 7, 2013 8:12 PM

What trends in agribusiness are conveyed in this map?

Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, November 29, 2013 5:30 PM

Why would someone want to do that to a horse? Horses are a great addition to the world because they can come in handy when it comes to pulling cargo and other objects also. Horses are having helped people for hundreds of years. I would go crazy if I found out I was eating horse meet. I am very surprised that those people from Ireland did not find out. There should really be an organization that checks the meet before it goes to supermarkets and other places. 

 

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NYTimes Video: Cultivating Dinner

NYTimes Video: Cultivating Dinner | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Americans ate 475 million pounds of tilapia last year, making this once obscure African native the most popular farmed fish in the United States.

 

Industrial farming, human-introduced species, GMOs, outsourcing and environmental impacts are but some of the relevant themes from this video.  How are global taste buds reshaping the geographic landscape? 


Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 25, 2013 9:04 AM

Industrial farming, human-introduced species, GMOs, outsourcing and environmental impacts are but some of the relevant themes from this video.  How are global taste buds reshaping the geographic landscape?


Tags: GMOsindustry, food, agriculture, agribusiness,

 

Cynthia Williams's curator insight, July 25, 2013 12:44 PM

My concern is how safe is bioengineered food?  How has its nutritional content been altered?  Until some of our questions about bioengineered food can be answered by the FDA and other government officials I remain leery about the potential side effects that might occur from eating it and wonder how nutritious it really is.

megan b clement's curator insight, December 16, 2013 1:59 AM
The video discusses how now alot of countries are industrially farm raising their fish. Tilapia is a perfect example Americans ate 475 million pounds of Tilapia last year. Ten years ago you would never even hear about Tilapia because it was not a popular fish. Times have changed how they raise them and then ship them out the video shows one of the farms where they grow the TIlapia.