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AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO
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Squatters on the Skyline

"Facing a mounting housing shortage, squatters have transformed an abandoned skyscraper in downtown Caracas into a makeshift home for more than 2,500 people."


Via Seth Dixon
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Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 13, 12:01 PM

Slums in Brazil are swelling in number and size, and because of the battle for elbow room, squatters are taking to the skies. Abandoned buildings in Caracas have been turned into self-help housing by over two thousand people who otherwise would have no where to live. These skyline slums have actually developed a form of community and security forces, small corner stores, social groups, and a sense of neighborly love have developed in some of these buildings. 

 

The buildings themselves are not particularly safe and remain unfinished, but they provide a much better option than living in the alleyways of flood zones. With a global influx of urbanization, specifically those moving into slums, it would make sense for people, or even governments, to utilize otherwise abandoned structures for inexpensive housing for the people moving to the city who cannot afford housing. It would reduce crime, increase safety, and make use of something that otherwise be torn down. 

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 14, 7:23 PM

Its amazing what people will do in order to make a home for themselves and their children. Here thousands of people have taken up residence in an abandoned skyscraper in Caracas. They have formed a while internal system to regulate and protect those living within the tower. This video shows the important concept of the economic possibilities a city can provided out weights the living space it it able to provide.

 

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 17, 1:50 AM

This video was taken in 2011 in Venezuela featuring squatters on the skyline. This is a 45-story office tower that was built in the early 1990's. It was described as a symbol for Venezuela's ambitions. Now, the building is known as the Tower Of David and has become a symbol of something else. More than 2500 squatters now live in this skyscraper, one of Latin America's tallest buildings. Keep in mind this has no air conditioning, no elevators, and no guard rails. People built things with their own hands to survive in the skyline. Most people often come to live here because they can not afford rent at an apartment. Also, the city suffers from a severe housing shortage. The government has not provided the squatters with any services, however, has not evicted them from the Tower of David. The government just lets them go inside without any restriction. For some people, they come to the Tower of David just to get off the streets. Mostly mothers with children so that their children are safe.

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Violence escalates in divided Venezuela

Violence escalates in divided Venezuela | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
CARACAS (Reuters) - Venezuelan security forces and demonstrators faced off in streets blocked by burning barricades in several cities on Thursday in an escalation of protests against President Nicolas

Via Seth Dixon
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Amy Marques's curator insight, April 24, 10:23 AM

I think it is important that the majority of the protesters against government are students. They want Maduro to resign from power and they blame his government for the violent crime, high inflation, product shortages and repression of opponents. Those who are fighting for  their rights say the police response to the uprisings has been excessive, and some detainees say they were tortured. I can’t help but think of what was going on the U.S. in the 1960's with the student activism against the Vietnam War and against the Nixon Presidency. Eventually, the U.S had to listen to its people. If Venezuela’s government doesn't listen soon, they could have a serious case on their hands.

Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, October 14, 11:24 AM

Venezuelan people are not happy with the socialist government that is taking place in their country.  Violent protests are being held in the streets hoping for some sort of change.  These protests are causing some major problems as well.  With the protests wreaking havoc in the streets, businesses are choosing not to open up for business, causing a greater negative impact on the economy.  Also the fact that news stations are not broadcasting any reliable information about what is going on with the protests is turning people to social media.  This can be a good thing until the information presented becomes unreliable because of people providing falsified information as well as images.  If the government would listen to the people to find out what they want maybe something could work out to stop the violence, arrests and injuries that are occurring as a result of these protests. 

Edelin Espino's curator insight, November 17, 1:55 PM

I think that Maduro should relinquish power and let the people choose their own leader. Continuing with such an absurd dictatorship is not good for anybody, especially an economy of third world that needs the support of other countries for sustain. It's sad to see people fighting for their rights and being attacked by their own advocates.