AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO
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Turkey’s New Maps Are Reclaiming the Ottoman Empire

Turkey’s New Maps Are Reclaiming the Ottoman Empire | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Erdogan’s aggressive nationalism is now spilling over Turkey’s borders, grabbing land in Greece and Iraq.

 

In the past few weeks, a conflict between Ankara and Baghdad over Turkey’s role in the liberation of Mosul has precipitated an alarming burst of Turkish irredentism. President Erdogan criticized the Treaty of Lausanne, which created the borders of modern Turkey, for leaving the country too small. Turkey won’t be annexing part of Iraq anytime soon, but this combination of irredentist cartography and rhetoric nonetheless offers some insight into Turkey’s current foreign and domestic policies and Ankara’s self-image.  The military interventions and confrontational rhetoric this nationalism inspires may worsen Turkey’s security and regional standing.

 

Tags: political, irredentism, culture, Turkey, historical, borders, empire, geopolitics.


Via Seth Dixon, Jodi Esaili
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Empire, Republic, Democracy: A History of Turkey

"The curriculum 'Empire, Republic, Democracy: A History of Turkey' traces the final years of the Ottoman Empire, the birth of the Turkish Republic, and contemporary issues in Turkey. Learn more at www.choices.edu/turkey "


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 9, 2015 4:49 PM

This video is a great introduction to the Choices Program's new unit on Turkey...a country that is truly a bridge between the Middle East and Europe, without being fully in either.   This unique global position makes Turkey a very important country to understand both culturally and politically.


Tags: politicalculture, Turkeyhistorical.

Matthew Richmond's curator insight, November 23, 2015 2:24 PM

Turkey has always been a country that I find interesting. So many amazing architectural structures and landscapes. I have two friends from high school who work there in the peace corps. I asked them what it's like and they couldn't really describe it. They said it isn't really Arabic but it certainly isn't western either. This was a good introductory video on the area.

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Would Turkey accept a Kurdish state?

Would Turkey accept a Kurdish state? | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
As the likelihood of an independent Kurdish state on Turkey’s eastern border grows, Ankara is losing its historical resistance to the idea.

 

Developments in Iraq have left Turkey facing the prospect of an independent Kurdish state on its eastern border. Such an idea would have been abhorrent for Turkey a mere decade ago for fear that its existence would incite separation among its own restive Kurds. The standard Turkish narrative at the time was that an independent Kurdistan was a Western project aimed at destroying Turkey, an age-old ambition. Even the 2003 US invasion of Iraq was viewed in this context by many. The picture is no longer so black and white.

  

Tags: Iraq, Turkey, MiddleEast, conflict, political, borders, devolution.


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MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 7:44 PM

APHG-U4

Chris Costa's curator insight, October 26, 2015 1:56 PM

The Kurdish people have longed for their own, independent nation for centuries, and it seems like the recent fission of Iraq has opened the door for their dream to become a reality. Although Turkey has long since been opposed to the existence of an ethnic Kurdish state (the result of its own sizable Kurdish minority), the rise of ISIS in Iraq and Syria and the subsequent military successes of the Kurds against militant Islamic groups have raised an important question: why don't they deserve their own nation? The Kurds have shown their dedication to the cause in combat, not shying away from the bloodshed that has gripped the region in the name of independence. Although the fracturing of the Iraqi state falls firmly against all official US and Turkey positions on the matter, the reality of the situation is far more complicated, and the supposed benefits of keeping Iraq together are seeming less and less worth the fighting. The Kurds have proven themselves capable of organizing, and they could perhaps add a new dimension of stability to the region.

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Protests 'no Turkish Spring' says PM

Protests 'no Turkish Spring' says PM | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
PM Recep Tayyip Erdogan again condemns the anti-government protests in Turkey, saying they do not constitute a Turkish Spring.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 6, 2013 7:48 PM

Many young citizens are accusing the Turkish government of becoming increasingly authoritarian and have taken to the streets as they fear that their secular society will follow more traditional Islamic values (just last week, the sale of alcohol was outlawed).  Over 1,700 have been arrested in 67 cities in these protests in the last few days.


Tags: conflict, political, Turkey.

Sarah Baker's comment, June 7, 2013 1:36 AM
That's no a good news. !
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Syrian Refugees

Syrian Refugees | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Syrians by the thousands are fleeing the violence in their home country and seeking refuge in neighboring countries.

 

Demographics and Politics: This photo essay is a varied glimpse into the refugee camps that have emerged from the Syrian uprisings against the Assad regime.  How are politics and migration connected?  Can you think of other examples where we see similar patterns? 


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Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, March 19, 2015 10:32 AM

These photos are extremely telling.  What strikes me are the pictures of many of the children.  Most of them have smiles on their faces and look genuinely happy just like any other child, even though their situations are horrific.  I applaud the Turkish government for not turning them away and at least coming up with a temporary solution.


One could say that we have a similar situation going on at our Mexican border.  What is even more problematic is that many people in America feel that we should not only offer no help but we should do our best to drive these innocent people away.  I know it's not an exact comparison but look at these photos from the Turkey/Syria border and if you can say you feel no need to give a helping hand to someone due to their "alien" status, then I would have to say that you are not a human being.

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Why Germany's recognition of Armenian genocide is such a big deal

Why Germany's recognition of Armenian genocide is such a big deal | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Armenian American journalist Liana Aghajanian says the German parliament's decision is all the more groundbreaking because it was a politician of Turkish descent who pushed it through.

 

The German Bundestag's overwhelming vote last week in favor of this resolution, with just one vote against and one abstention, brought both gratitude and anger. Armenian communities, many of them descendants of genocide survivors who are dispersed across the world, are grateful. Turkey, however, was incensed and recalled its ambassador to Germany. Many Turks see the vote as not just a threat to longstanding German-Turkish relations, but to Turkish national identity.


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 7, 2016 4:53 PM

I've posted in about the Armenian genocide in the past, and until Turkey acknowledges that it was a genocide, this issue will continue to fester.  Considering that Germany has a large Turkish population and an obvious historical connection to genocide, this recognition is far more important some other random country taking this stance. 

 

TagsArmenia, genocidepolitical, conflict, TurkeyGermanywar, historical.  

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The Armenian Genocide-100 years

The Armenian Genocide-100 years | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

“For most of the world, the Armenian Genocide is the slaughter you know next to nothing about. But every year on April 24, Genocide Remembrance Day, we Armenians remember the injustice of a crime that is rarely acknowledged and often flatly denied. It was April 24, 1915, when the Armenian intellectuals, professionals, editors and religious leaders in Constantinople were rounded up by the Ottoman authorities — and almost all of them executed. During World War I, the Ottoman Empire killed three of every four of its Armenian citizens. The majority of Armenians alive today are descendants of the few survivors.”


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Maricarmen Husson's curator insight, April 17, 2015 7:37 PM

A 100 AÑOS DEL GENOCIDIO ARMENIO

Cada año el 24 de abril, día de la conmemoración del Genocidio, nosotros los armenios recordamos la injusticia de un crimen que rara vez se reconoció y a menudo negó rotundamente.

Era el 24 de abril de 1915, cuando los intelectuales armenios, profesionales, editores y líderes religiosos de Constantinopla fueron detenidos por las autoridades otomanas - y casi todos ellos ejecutados. Durante la Primera Guerra Mundial, el Imperio Otomano mató a tres de cada cuatro de sus ciudadanos armenios. La mayoría de los armenios vivos hoy son descendientes de los pocos sobrevivientes ".

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, May 1, 2015 4:17 PM

I have to be honest, I never knew we had a Genocide Remembrance Day.  As I get older, there seems to be a day for everything.  This is a horrific act.  Unfortunately, as we've seen historically many countries have tried this.  There is never a good outcome.  It's atrocious that we could ever standby and not do something.  

Eden Eaves's curator insight, May 24, 2015 6:24 PM

Unit 3

For most of the world, the Armenian Genocide is the slaughter we know almost nothing about. But every year on April 24,Genocide Remembrance Day, Armenians all over the world remember the injustice of a crime that is rarely acknowledged and often flatly denied. It was April 24, 1915, when the Armenian intellectuals, professionals, editors and religious leaders in Constantinople were rounded up by the Ottoman authorities — and almost all of them executed. During World War I, the Ottoman Empire killed three of every four of its Armenian citizens. The majority of Armenians alive today are descendants of the few survivors

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Walled World

Walled World | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
We chart the routes of, and reasons for, the barriers which are once again dividing populations

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Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 29, 2014 1:06 AM

We looked at this map in class its really interesting nd weird to see all the dividing walls in the world and to discover ones youve never seen before.

Tanya Townsend's curator insight, October 12, 2015 9:53 PM

The video attached to this article reminded me made me think "racism". It is not Americas first time targeting one cultural group and antagonizing them. We did it to the Indians, Jews, at one time we denied Chinese immigrants the right to enter the country or become a citizen. The projection of walls in my opinion only creates more room for crime. I would love to research what benefits its had. I think the world is lacking the understand that people are people .period. This segregation and division is so unnecessary and creates wars, tension, hostility, and divide.

 

Gene Gagne's curator insight, December 2, 2015 9:41 AM

the social impact is we do not get to mingle with people of different culture, religion, ethnicity. Economically businesses do not grow at least on the small business side. There is no chance of growth. what about population once again if you stay with in a section divided by walls then the population stays within. a society would have to stay above the 2.06 fertility rate to keep their population stable.

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Feuding Over Food

Feuding Over Food | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
In the Caucasus, culinary nationalism is an extension of the region's long-simmering disputes.

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Jamie Strickland's curator insight, January 29, 2013 2:36 PM

This is a great addition to include for my World Food Problems course this semester.

Meagan Harpin's curator insight, September 30, 2013 11:25 AM

A nations food is often used to celebrate their national identity but it can also be used to highlight national rivalries. For example the Czechs reffer to their Slovak cousins as Halusky after one of their traditonal dishes. Culinary flashpoints can also arise when nations claim the same dishes as their own.  

Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, February 18, 2014 3:30 PM

Azerbaijanis, Turks, and Armenian share a lot of the same foods. Instead of enjoying the similarities and cultural nationalism, they are disputing. Eat, drink and be  merry?

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Virtual tour of the Haga Sophia

Virtual tour of the Haga Sophia | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

This is one of the more impressive cultural landmarks in the world, and an architectural marvel.  Studying the cultural landscape reveals that multiple 'layers' are superimposed one upon another.  This phenomenon, known as sequent occupance, is most plainly manifested in this site.  The Haga Sophia has been both a Christian and Muslim holy site, depending which political empire has controlled the city of Istanbul.       


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Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 15, 2014 12:57 PM

Visiting the Haga Sophia is on my bucket list for sure! I find it fascinating how one beautiful site can radiate so many different historical periods as well as cultural differences. The Haga Sophia has traces of the religions and people that held control over it at one time or another. 

Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, December 7, 2015 4:59 PM

Haga Sophia is a cultural landmark that has been a Christian and Muslim holy site that all depends on who was in control of the land of that particular time. This is a great example of different times in history that use the same monument and how it plays a significant role in the people of time past and present.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 4:29 PM

This is a place of both Christian and Muslim society. It is in control by a system of sequent occupancy, meaning that who ever is in control of the area of the time is in control of the Haga Sophia. This one site shows the past of different religions and people. It tells a story of its past, present and future.