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AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO
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Ruling On NYC Disaster Plans For Disabled May Have Far Reach

Ruling On NYC Disaster Plans For Disabled May Have Far Reach | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"A year after Superstorm Sandy stranded many New Yorkers without power for days, a federal judge has ruled that New York City's emergency plans violate the Americans with Disabilities Act. Those shortcomings, the judge found, leave almost 900,000 residents in danger, and many say the ruling could have implications for local governments across the country."


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Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, November 29, 2013 9:35 PM

I am disabled, and while I am not in a wheelchair, I would implore the politicians to come up with accommodations for those that are, or have other severe forms of disabilities.  I damaged my brain and spinal cord in an accident that cost me some of my psychological functions, as well as a lot of the fine motor skills in my hands and body.  I remember what it was like before my accident, and I know that there was nowhere along the line that I asked to be disabled.  The people in wheelchairs, or the people who cannot evacuate themselves from areas of danger, are people that should in fact be prioritized, not left behind, when it comes to evacuating during emergencies.  In class our group discussed that the average able-body person should be prioritized during evacuation, but I kept thinking- what if something happened to them? What if they broke their leg during a flood evacuation?  Should they be left behind?  I would suggest that rather than answer these James Wan-like instances of moral quandary, we prepare for them and come up with access for the handicapped to be evacuated- in such an instance where NO ONE would have to be prioritized OR left behind.  That is the only fair way to deal with this sort of idea, without leaving anybody behind.  I have had dealings with people with disabilities, and a guy I know that is in fact wheelchair bound, is one of the most productively creative people of his age that I have encountered- wheelchair or not, he has produced, written, and directed two full length feature films before his 22nd birthday, one of which has screened at the Sundance Film Festival.  I had the privilege of working with him during some photoshoots, and I was really quite inspired by what he does, enough to pursue film-making on my own.  I feel that people today don't really care until something affects them.  Negative thoughts against those that prioritize against the disabled in events of emergency do not enter my head; rather, I feel that there must be something we can work out now, in a time of no immediate emergency, that can save us all...

Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 12, 2013 12:34 PM

In my opinion I do not think it was all of New Yorks fault that some handicapp people could not get the help they needed. There are a lot of people in New York and not everyone could make it out even if they were not handicapp. I think these people should have a back up plan as well just incase. You could have a family member, neighbor, or friend come and help you and give you a ride.  

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 16, 2013 11:01 AM

This subject is the definition of a gray area matter. Of course you want to treat everyone equally and have everyone come out of a sotrm unscathed, but to do soo you have to tip the scales so much that it becomes unfair for un handicapped people. Sure New York could of done this better. But also some neglegence has to fall on the citizens. If your and elderly handicap person and know a major storm is comming you should try to evacuate immediatly, you dont need the news to give you the A Ok to go. Yes the City should have gave a heads up atleast 10 hours in advance so people could better prepare better but the citizens have to be away of their own situation. This comes down to an ancient survival theme the survival of the fittest were if you weak and not smart you die off simple ass that.

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Bike Share Map

Bike Share Map | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Visualisation for bike shares across the world.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 28, 2013 9:10 AM

Many cities (including Denver) have active bike share programs to ease congestion and foster a less automobile-centric urban design.  London, Paris and Mexico City are a handful of the international cities listed here but it isn't only the largest cities (Hello Lillestrøm, Norway!).  In the U.S., it is the same with typical cities (NYC and Washington DC) as well as as some smaller cities (Chattanooga and Omaha).  Is your city on the list


Tags: transportation, urban, planning.

Louis Culotta's curator insight, July 4, 2013 5:13 PM

This is great...They should have this on the east bay bike path in the Bristol, Warren & Barrington area. I went out on it today and it was so busy they could have set up some traffic cops on it to pull some people over with so meny near collisions of people riding and walking together.

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1832 Cholera Epidemic in NYC

1832 Cholera Epidemic in NYC | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
A cholera outbreak in New York in 1832 led to broad efforts to clean up the city and others like it.

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How Many People Can Manhattan Hold?

How Many People Can Manhattan Hold? | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
In a crowded place like Manhattan, it’s only rational to wonder: Just how many people can this city handle?

 

After spending time last week in Manhattan for the AAG annual meeting, the idea of density in the city and especially historical densities and how transportations systems, technologies available and standards of living all impact population density.  Please explore the graphic "Manhattan's population Density, Past and Present" in the article or here: http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2012/03/01/realestate/manhattans-population-density-past-and-present.html


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Kyle M. Norton's comment, March 7, 2012 11:52 AM
I agree there needs to be ways to make the city more efficient the status quo can not maintain this structure forever.
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Animated History Of NYC Subway

Animated History Of NYC Subway | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
An animated GIF starts with a blank subway map and draws each line in the sequence in which it was built. 

 

Some excellent urban historical geographies to been seen here.  Pictured here is a still image, but the link will take you to the dynamic animated version.  


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This Guy's Never Met a Map He Didn't Want to Fix

This Guy's Never Met a Map He Didn't Want to Fix | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Just not always for the better: "I've deliberately designed maps that are deliberately horrible to look at, and succeeded."

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 30, 2013 10:46 PM

All maps are compromises; the Mercator projection preserves shape but distorts size, and so on.  What about sacrificing locational accuracy to preserve the aesthetic design or readability?  Just some things to think about as you peruse these redesigned subway maps.  


Tags: visualization, transportation, mapping, NYC.

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New York's Changing Skyline

New York's Changing Skyline | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 26, 2013 3:55 PM

I love this visualization of New York City's evolving skyline from 1876-2013.  The urban landscape of America's prominent cities has changed dramatically. 


Tags: historical,urbanarchitecture, landscape, NYC.

Louis Culotta's comment, May 1, 2013 11:32 AM
I wonder if the tallest building in the first picture is the first stage of the Brooklyn Bridge??????
Louis Culotta's curator insight, May 1, 2013 11:35 AM

if you look at the first picture...it looks like the tall building on the water could be the first stage of the Brooklyn Bridge...any suggestions to this?

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New York -- before the City

TED Talks 400 years after Hudson found New York harbor, Eric Sanderson shares how he made a 3D map of Mannahatta's fascinating pre-city ecology of hills, rivers, wildlife -- accurate down to the block -- when Times Square was a wetland and you...

 

KC: The Manhattan Project created a picture of the area before the development of a city, the way Henry Hudson did during his 1609 exploration. After 10 years (1999-2009), the research project has expanded to study the entire city of New York. The Welikia Project analyzes geography and landscape ecology to discover the original environment and compare it to present day. Scientists have learned that world's largest cities once had a natural landscape of freshwater wetlands and salt marshes, ponds and streams, forests and fields with an equally diverse wildlife community. By focusing on the city's biodiversity of 400 years ago and the modern era, information can be gathered about what has changed, what has remained constant, where the city was done well and where it needs to improve. This source is useful because it allows for the visualization of NYC in a way never seen before. Urban environments, such as NYC, have a landscape largely created by humans, so the skyscrapers, pavement, and mass population is far removed from the landscape it once was.

 

Find more information about the Welikia Project and more on New York City's urban ecology on this scoop.it topic.


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Kim Vignale's comment, August 12, 2012 2:03 PM
I was surprised on how green NYC is because of all the cars and urban development. I think this project topic is very informative and interesting (makes me want to got to NYC) . I thought it was very interesting how NYC was in the early 1900s and how it became now. I also think it's a great idea how adding more greenery to the urban city will add sort of a rural feel to a big city.
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How New York Pay Phones Became Guerrilla Libraries

How New York Pay Phones Became Guerrilla Libraries | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Artist John Locke is converting obsolete Manhattan phone booths into mini libraries. Now if only people would stop stealing his entire book collection.

 

The pay phone has become an obsolete part of the urban infrastructure in the cell phone era, and the question of what to do with these has become a real issue.  Leaving them in their current form is essentially conceding that the city is technologically outdated and some fear that is the wrong message to be visually transmitting in the landscape.  As thousands of geographers are set to desend on New York City for the AAG conference, this is another example of appropriating public space for a communal project that deserves some firsthand investigation (I really want to see one!). 


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sdion's comment, February 26, 2012 12:31 PM
its a really cool concept but one i dont see working out. with anything out there like that for people to take without having to pay for them upfront and no consequences for not going along with the idea of it i dont see many people going out of their way to either return a book or replace it with one of their own.
Crystal's curator insight, June 27, 8:41 PM

I really want to see one of these too. This is very neat and definelty one of the best examples of communities projects.