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This Is What Inequality Looks Like In Mexico

This Is What Inequality Looks Like In Mexico | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Mexico has an inequality problem. The uneven distribution of wealth is perhaps best illustrated by a series of images captured by photographer Oscar Ruíz in Mexico City. Produced by ad firm Publicis, the campaign seeks to to highlight the huge...

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Walled World

Walled World | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
We chart the routes of, and reasons for, the barriers which are once again dividing populations

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Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 14, 9:48 PM

It appears India is constructing a 2,500-mile long fence around its neighboring country Bangladesh. The barbed wire fence may have been built due to that fact India has one of the largest populations in the world and they do not want the struggling people of Bangladesh to enter their country. Also, areas around the fence are becoming dangerous, with more than 1,000 people killed by border patrol and criminals. There are not many jobs in Bangladesh and the people are having trouble finding clean drinkable water. Lastly, the people may be fleeing into India hoping to find work and an improved lifestyle.  

Whitney Souery's curator insight, May 28, 6:51 PM

Walls are a symbol of political boundaries and motives, usually intended to keep certain people in or out. This website in particular clearly highlights this idea in human geography as it explores the various walls that mark our landscape and thus contribute to changing policies and borders. Walls can also affect the landscape, not just mark it, as an effect of asserting either political dominance or border policies, as best seen by the resulting environmental results that come from it and the displacement of people (as seen on Palestinian-Israeli border). 

Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 29, 1:06 AM

We looked at this map in class its really interesting nd weird to see all the dividing walls in the world and to discover ones youve never seen before.

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Shifting sands: Changing Geography of the Mexican Drug War

Shifting sands: Changing Geography of the Mexican Drug War | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

FIVE years ago next week, Felipe Calderón took office as Mexico’s president and launched a crackdown against organised crime.

 

While the rates of murders are plateauing at 12,000 per year, internally where are these murders taking place?  Which places are becoming more critical to control?  Murders are shifting east (From Sinaloa and Chihuahua to Nuevo Leon and Veracruz).  Why is this shift occurring?  What does this shift indicate politically and economically for Mexico?


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Joshua Choiniere's comment, September 26, 2012 11:28 AM
What this map as well as article show me is that there is corruption in every aspect of the Mexican Goverment and at some point or another the goverment is taking sides with or assisstance from some of the major cartels. In order to crack down other groups to get rid of them. So in order to fully curb and elminate the cartels the Goverment will have to become stronger, independnt, and not assossciate with one group over another. They should try and perharps raise a larger enough force like the military and just systemmatically* force these cartels out one by one.
Brett Sinica's curator insight, September 29, 2013 1:27 PM

These numbers are astonishing especially when based simply on drugs, money, and power.  Compared to the article where it described Tijuana as still being one of the major cities for murder, the numbers and color scheme seem to show the region as one of the areas with less murders.  Heading south into the country, is Mexico City.  The city which is surrounded by such a large metropolitan area with a vast gap between poor and rich tends to have low murder rates.  This is very interesting considering popular belief tends to focus on such violence being conducted in large cities where there is better chance of cartels using the neighborhoods and people within them to strengthen their empire.  This makes me wonder if the authorities are too strong for cartels to infiltrate and become powerful, or on a limb, do the cartels have a mutual agreement not to do business in the country's economical and cultural hub?

Julia & Eva's curator insight, November 29, 2013 5:34 PM

This artilce falls under the category of political. It shows that Mexico's continuing drug war has effected the people that live there with lots of violence. By getting a new president, their murder rates have gone down, which has had a significant benefit on their country.

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The Writing on Mexican Walls Isn't Graffiti—It's 'Vernacular Branding' - The Atlantic

The Writing on Mexican Walls Isn't Graffiti—It's 'Vernacular Branding' - The Atlantic | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"...The new book Mexican Wall Painting: Bardas De Baile (Ghost & Co., New York) by Patricia Cué, a designer and design teacher at San Diego State University, examines these expressive painted letterings and the subcultures that have developed around them..."


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On the Border

On the Border | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
The border between the United States and Mexico stretches 3,169 kilometers (1,969 miles), crossing deserts, rivers, towns, and cities from the Pacific to the Gulf of Mexico

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Kevin Barker's curator insight, May 13, 2013 5:00 PM

Fantastic images of the border.  As long as the pull factors continue to be so great, it will always be a game of obstacles to be overcome.

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A quieter drug war in Mexico, but no less deadly

A quieter drug war in Mexico, but no less deadly | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Months have gone by since the last of the grisly mass killings that have marked the conflict’s darkest moments.

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Paige Therien's curator insight, February 6, 3:02 PM

The new president of Mexico, Enrique Pena Nieto, has been trying to make the Cartel and governments fighting less apparent.  In a war, each side has to learn how to play the other's game, which is what is happening here.  Perhaps the Cartel is going along with this so they can "test the waters" of this new president and his very different policies (compared to Felipe Calderon).  Nieto wants to focus less on the drug wars, so the Cartel is laying low in northern rural areas, so they can still smuggle drugs into and guns out of the United States.

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, September 29, 12:10 PM

Mexico is notorious for its very public battle with the militarized drug Cartels that have wreaked havoc for decades. Both the Cartels and the Mexican government seem to be employing new tactics in regards to their feud. Even though drug-related deaths are still incredibly high, the Cartels are trying to keep on the quiet side. They are learning that it is risky business openly taunting and engaging the military, because of the danger and the publicity that forces the government to come down harder on them.

Alec Castagno's curator insight, October 6, 1:16 PM

The war between cartels and the Mexican government has moved out of the limelight as both sides tire of the all-public fight seen in the past. Attacks on the military and police has made drug smuggling over the border more difficult, so the cartels have lessened their attacks on the government and the government has stopped using public demonstrations to gain popular support. Even though the nature of the fighting has changed, the death toll has stayed roughly the same, showing that the situation is far from over.

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What we can learn from Mexico

What we can learn from Mexico | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

Earlier this month, the president told a newspaper the solution to partisanship is politics and more politics.


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Marissa Roy's curator insight, October 23, 2013 12:46 PM

This article is particularly interesting. It is so common to hear about the drug wars going on in Mexico, but much less common to hear how the country is doing economically. It makes sense that their economy is growing, as the United States imports many goods and products from across the border. This goes hand in hand with how the Mexican government also pays their workers more than most Chinese workers recieve. Mostly it is their geographic location to the United States that is making their economy grow.

Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, February 4, 12:22 PM

The future of Mexico is starting to look better and better as President Enrique Pena Nieto increases taxes, competition and takes on the teachers’ unions. With these reforms, Nieto is looking to build a better Mexico and succeed other surrounding countries.

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, September 29, 2:18 PM

The facts about the "new" Mexico help in reasoning why less people are migrating.  The new Mexico looks hopeful and prosperous but when you read about the affects of the drug wars and violence, we see that there is still room for progress for the country in order to keep their citizens from leaving Mexico.

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Why more Mexicans are staying home

Tiny Tamaula is the new face of rural Mexico: Villagers are home again as the illegal immigration boom drops to net zero. Full story on CSMonitor.com: http:/...

 

Contrary to popular opinion, illegal immigration from Mexico to the United States is not really a problem in 2012.  As conditions on both sides of the border have changed, this gives a glimpse into the life choices of Mexican villagers.  For more on this issue see the complete article at: http://www.csmonitor.com/World/Americas/2012/0408/Home-again-in-Mexico-Illegal-immigration-hits-net-zero ;


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Cam E's curator insight, February 4, 11:55 AM

I enjoy stories like this, because it demonstrates people willing to fight for their home. Many interesting ideas lie behind stories such as this one, but what I find especially intriguing is the dynamics of money in relation to these small rural villages. Money and "income" drives our current economic positions, but there are some places which were left behind and have none of the jobs we in the first world would traditionally think of. They had to either subside off their own products through farming, or trade their livelyhood for a small amount of money. Put simply, money is necessary for a so called "modern" existence, but not necessary for survival. These villagers are working for their own future in their home country now though, while it may not be necessarily profitable in the short term, it will pay off for their children in the long term.

James Hobson's curator insight, September 23, 11:29 AM

(Mexico topic 1)
"Things are not good in the United States. There is not a lot of work and Mexicans like to keep busy." I was surprised by this this comment which sums up one of the main reasons why many Mexican immigrants are returning to Mexico. This implies that as the American economy has worsened, Mexico's must be improving (at least by comparison). This completely supports the concept of Mexico evolving into a "semi-core" country.
   Additionally, I hope this quote will help to shed some truth onto the negative lazy stereotype many Americans associate with immigrating Mexicans.

Shanelle Zaino's curator insight, October 16, 9:44 PM

Harsher border control and less opportunity have created a dramatic decrease in the amount of people coming to the United States.I think a large misconception among many Americans is that people from other countries come here to take advantage of our governmental support, in many cases this is just not true.People from other countries often come to the US to have a better life in the way of more opportunities . With the current state of our economic health it has become less and less beneficial to do that.

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Nogales, Mexico: A Few Steps, and a Whole World Away

Nogales, Mexico: A Few Steps, and a Whole World Away | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
A writer who has crossed many borders finds the one between Nogales, Ariz., and Mexico to be the oddest frontier of all.

 

Given that most of the articles concerning the border these days reflect on the policing of the border, the illegal flow of people, drugs or guns across the border, or the violence in the borderlands, this is refreshing change of pace.  Paul Theroux focused on the cultural connections that form, not in spite of the border, but because of the border and the cultural vibrance of Nogales, Sonora. 


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Sheyna Vargas's comment, September 19, 2012 1:21 PM
Everyone is always talking and writing about Mexicans crossing the border, taking jobs, and smuggling drugs into the US. It’s nice to find an article showing their humility and kindness to others. These people in this town just over the border are trying to improve it by adding security, school programs, and keeping their town clean.

I think there’s so much that can be learned from this article. As Theroux states, “the neighborhoods just across the fence are not representative of the town at large, which is a lesson in how to know another country: stay longer, travel deeper, overcome timidity.” So, while, yes, there are dangerous areas in Mexico, not every town is the same. Not all Mexicans are dangerous drug dealers who want to steal your job.
Jessica Martel's curator insight, February 7, 2013 5:45 PM

cool

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Immigration to U.S. From Mexico in Decline Amid Tough Economy

Immigration to U.S. From Mexico in Decline Amid Tough Economy | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
The number of Mexicans leaving for the United States is just about cancelled out by the number returning, according to statistics provided by the Mexican government.

 

Besides being an important (underreported) political fact, this new migratory pattern can lead to a good discussion of push and pull factors that lead to the geography of migration. 


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Drug war sparks exodus of affluent Mexicans

Drug war sparks exodus of affluent Mexicans | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Tens of thousands of well-off Mexicans have moved north of the border in a quiet exodus over the past few years, according to local officials, border experts and demographers.

 

The migration from Mexico to the USA has slowed tremendously in the 21st century, but due to the drug violence, the demographic profile of the migrants has changed significantly. 


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Nathan Chasse's curator insight, January 24, 3:02 PM

This article is about a recent rise in affluent Mexicans immigrating to the United States to escape the drug war violence in Mexico. These wealthy Mexican immigrants are in stark contrast to the stereotype of the poor illegal-boarder-crossing Mexican immigrant. They come to the United States and live in expensive homes, drive fancy cars, and invest in business. While these immigrants are a boon to the United States economy, Mexico is losing some of the most important citizens; the ones with the wealth to create jobs.

 

The article highlights just how damaging the drug cartels are to Mexico's future.

Amy Marques's curator insight, February 12, 1:22 PM

Despite Mexico making improvements to make Mexicans want to stay below the border. The drug trafficking violence does make people want to leave. Tens of thousands of well-off Mexicans, wealthy businessmen and average Mexicans are fleeing Mexico and have moved north of the border in a quiet exodus, and they're being warmly welcomed, unlike the much larger population of illegal immigrants. Mexicans are fleeing cartel wars that have left more than 37,000 Mexicans dead in just 4 years, 

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, September 29, 2:12 PM

This article is interesting because we were used to seeing poorer immigrants from Mexico looking for work and a new way of life.  However, the more affluent communities are migrating North to the U.S. and legally because of the turmoil of the drug wars in their country.  It is disappointing to see that drugs, violence and murder are pushing away people from their own country

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Will American Pot Farmers Put the Cartels out of Business?

Will American Pot Farmers Put the Cartels out of Business? | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
They've driven prices so low that Mexican growers are giving up.

 

For the first time ever, many of the farmers who supply Mexican drug cartels have stopped planting marijuana, reports the Washington Post. "It's not worth it anymore," said Rodrigo Silla, a lifelong cannabis farmer from central Mexico. "I wish the Americans would stop with this legalization."  Facing stiff competition from pot grown legally and illegally north of the border, the price for a kilogram of Mexican schwag has plummeted by 75 percent, from $100 to $25.


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Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, September 21, 10:17 PM

This article is quite interesting.  I had no idea what the legalization of pot would do for the Mexican growers and didn't really think about it.  I never really thought of Mexico being a huge supplier of pot to the United States.  Apparently it is and the legalization of pot in the United States is not helping their business at all.

Alec Castagno's curator insight, September 23, 11:00 AM

As marijuana becomes more common and increasingly legitimized in the United States, the international drug market is beginning to feel the effects. Drug cartel traffickers have begun settling and growing on American soil, but it would seem even that will not help them compete with the new mass of medical and recreational marijuana grown "professionally" elsewhere in the country. This, paired with other news articles claiming states can earn billions off marijuana taxes, offer more support to the argument for legalization.

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, October 13, 7:39 PM

This article shows that what happen in one country can have an effect on another. The decriminalization of marijuana in the U.S is causing the business of the cartels to drop 75%, and with the DEA spending $2 billion to keep illegal drugs from crossing the border, it is making people feel safer.

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Mexico: African Migrants

United Nations, New York, May 2012 - Mexico has long been a haven for poor migrants from Latin America. But this is a story about an unexpected group of peop...

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For Migrants, New Land of Opportunity Is Mexico

For Migrants, New Land of Opportunity Is Mexico | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

From blogs.kqed.org - Today, 10:29 AM
 It used to be that neuroscientists thought smart people were all alike. But now they think that some very smart people retain the ability to learn rapidly, like a child, well into adolescence.

“Until adolescence there are lots of new connections being made between neurons to store patterns and information collected from the environment,” Brant says.

The brain adds many synapses in the cortex. This comes at a time when the brain is especially responsive to learning. This is typically followed by cortical pruning in adolescence, as the brain shifts from hyperlearning mode.

Hewitt agrees: “The developing brain is a much more flexible organ than the mature brain.”

Learning doesn’t stop at adolescence, of course, but the “sensitive period” — where the brain is hyperlearning mode — does appear to come to an end. Learning new things gets harder.

 


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Shanelle Zaino's curator insight, October 16, 12:14 PM

It is good to see  Mexico is being considered as an up and coming country on the global stage. It was interesting to see this graphic depicting the influx of migration to Mexico. It was also very interesting to read that more people are immigrating to Mexico than the U.S.. This is a fact that is not often made apparent when there is a discussion about immigration in the U.S. 

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, October 16, 8:04 PM

While in the United States we often view Mexico as a source of immigrants in search of jobs and stability, while in actuality the scenario is some what different. What the US is to Mexico, Mexico is to numerous Middle Americans. These are people leaving destitute areas looking for employment. Articles like this are important in the fact they shine light onto topics many people they they already are experts of.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, Today, 11:15 AM

As jobs become less and less available in the United States, it does not surprise me that the number of migrants from the US to Mexico is growing. Globalization is shifting the job markets for production through North America. That is bolster by NAFTA and because production is cheaper in Mexico for US companies, more jobs in production are popping up. My question is that will we see this happen in the future as Mexico continues to grow, will we see migrations of lower wage workers more south to countries that are cheap for companies. 

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Popocatépetl

Popocatépetl | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

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sabina cardascia's curator insight, June 12, 2013 7:26 PM

horror!!!

Brett Sinica's curator insight, September 29, 2013 1:11 PM

Among active volcanos in the world, this would be an extremly devastating one if it were to explode.  Less than 50 miles from Mexico City, which is home to more than 20 million people in its entirety could be of threat.  Just this year in July, there was steam and ash released which cancelled flights in and out of Mexico City and Toluca.  That's a mere fraction of what could happen if this volcano had a full-blown explosion.  On a lighter note, on days with good weather, this volcano is quite a spectacle of nearby cities and is the second highest peak in Mexico.

Shanelle Zaino's curator insight, October 16, 12:56 PM

As always the advances in technology never cease to amaze me. I love that you are able to see images of this volcano in streaming time. Just viewing the still image above gives you a glimpse of why this volcano is so widely the topic of mysticism. As you peer to the peak one can only wonder what it would be to like to stand there.When I clicked on the link there was another still image with a message that I can only assume said that the camera was temporarily down (it was in Spanish). I will check this link again to see when it is up and running.

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Some manufacturers say 'adios' to China

Some manufacturers say 'adios' to China | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
The cost of doing business in China has been rising steadily, say companies that have returned to Mexico.

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Allison Anthony's curator insight, March 27, 2013 7:07 AM

What goes around, comes almost back around.  At least these jobs are getting closer to possibly returning to the US.

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California-Mexico Border: Dreams of a Transnational Metropolis

California-Mexico Border: Dreams of a Transnational Metropolis | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"A basic truth about the cultural geography of the California border [is this]—two very different city-building traditions come crashing into each other at one of the most contentious international boundary lines on the planet. In this collision, in the shocking contrast of landscapes, lies one critical ingredient of the border’s place identity."


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Ann-Laure Liéval's curator insight, January 27, 2013 6:29 AM

Les territoires de la mondialisation: les frontières. Une frontière qui se ferme et pourtant, une urbanisation continue mais contrastée. 

Emma Lafleur's curator insight, February 7, 2013 5:45 PM

It is interesting to see how this border has transformed from a fence to a guideline and back over time. Researchers of these two cities can learn a lot about how the events of one country affect the other country, such as in the case of 9/11. This place is also a great place to study culture because it is here where researchers can study a melding of two cultures in action. Overall, this area gives great insight into how two bordering countries affect each other politically, economically, socially, and culturally.

Al Picozzi's curator insight, September 23, 2013 9:46 AM

Also have heard stories of Tijuana...you know what happens there stays there.  Much like the Kennedy's in the US, Tijuana got its initial fame and wealth from the alcohol trade when the US started prohibition in the 1920, albeit the Kennedy family did it illegally with bootlegging.  Interesting contrast of building styles and cutures.  The space on the map makes this area what it is.  Without San Diego, Tijuana wouldn't be the same and San Diego wouldn't be the same without Tijuana.  This area also shows a contrast with the Canadian border.  Little or no fences on that border, but here, there are two in some spots, an old onecand a new post 9/11 one.  Why here then are there fences?  Culture too different?  Is it for racial reasons?  Is it just the drug trade and cartels that are all over the area the reason?  Is it US drug policy that makes the fence necessary?  Is it the US policy on immigration that the the fence a necessity?  Is it the worse economic conditions in Mexico or the violence that is forcing the people to run across the border?  Lots of questions and right now it looks like nobody has any real answers.   

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For first time since Depression, more Mexicans leave U.S. than enter

For first time since Depression, more Mexicans leave U.S. than enter | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
A study sees a decline in immigration to the United States from Mexico after tightened border control, increased deportations, a flagging U.S. economy and a declining Mexican birthrate.

 

The wave of immigrants coming into the USA is something of the past. Push factors: Why are more Mexicans choosing to stay in Mexico?  Pull factors: Why is the United States less on an option for many would-be migrants these days?  Cross-border issues: How are issues on both sides of the border changing these patterns? 


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Mikaela Kennedy's curator insight, February 7, 2013 5:48 PM

One of the last lines in this really stood out to me: "Mexicans would rather be in a precarious situation than a situation of fear."  I feel as though that is true for all people living on earth. 

James Hobson's curator insight, September 23, 11:59 AM

(Mexico topic 3)

   Instead of focusing on the reasons behind the decline/reversal in Mexico-America immigration in my first topic, for this article I would like to mention how the facts cited differ so greatly from what is being broadcast and inferred from larger news agencies. Especially within the last few months, I would've thought that Mexican immigration into the US would be at an all-time high. Never would I have previously guessed that it would be closer to a net gain of near 0 (or even a net loss). This goes to show how news agencies "cater" to certain demographics of people and what they want to hear. To me it's like a lobbyist recruitment, trying to gain more supporters of a specific cause in hopes of achieving a specific goal.

   On a separate note, I was interested in the mention of how certain researchers believe the pattern could shift again once the US economy begins to further recover. I wonder if a rise in immigration would actually happen, given that Mexico's economy is now more developed and providing more opportunity? That's something to think about...

Shanelle Zaino's curator insight, October 18, 11:54 AM
According to the report, the Mexican-born population, which had been increasing since 1970, peaked at 12.6 million in 2007 and has dropped to 12 million since then.-WashingtonPost

This is a staggering statistic.The tightening of border control, increase in deportations ,as well as a declining economy, have all contributed to this decrease in people coming into the U.S. from Mexico. People born in Mexico are also finding more oppurtunites at home and less desire to leave. There is no telling if this decline will be permanent or temporary, however many are speculating we will not see the strong numbers we saw in the 20th and early 21st centuries. This is a little concerning for me , I feel that when people do come to this country they should do it the leagal way ,however is it a cause for concer when the "land of oppurtunity" no longer seems to be the best choice.What is that saying about our country? Should we worry when people stop wanting to come here?

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Power of Place

Power of Place | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Explore educational and professional development resources for teachers and classrooms on Annenberg Media's learner.org. Companion to the Annenberg Media series Power of Place.

 

Maquiladoras, outsourcing, migration and regional differences within Mexico are main themes in this video.  This is a resource of videos that many are very familiar with, but this is worth repeating for those not familiar with the Annenberg Media's "Power of Place" video series.  With 26 videos (roughly 30 minutes each) that are regionally organized, this be a great resource for teachers. 


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Jessica Rieman's curator insight, February 4, 12:59 PM

During this video you can distanctly see the differences between the outsourcing that Latin American had to do in order to surivive with their goverment the way it was and also how the mirgation came into play by which groups of people migrated to specific regions and what made them move there. Regional differences are also a major factor because of the regions and how they have progressed theought time and what will happen in the future.

miya harris's curator insight, September 10, 9:46 AM

This video talks about the migration in Mexico and the reasons the people had for migrating. At the beginning of the video it talks about border patrol and people trying to illegally  cross the border from Mexico to America. When border patrol wrote up the reports they had to record what city the people came from and that helped geographer Richard Jones with his research plan to find out what regions were driving people out of Mexico.

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Christmas in Mexico

Christmas in Mexico | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
There are some very special traditions surrounding Christmas celebrations in Mexico.

 

Yo quiero encontrar un lugar en New England con buñuelos!


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Wikinarco: mapping narcoviolence

Wikinarco: mapping narcoviolence | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
RT @WomanVote: Wikinarco: mapping narcoviolence – Boing Boing http://t.co/OtsB8wni #Mexico #NarcoWar #violence...

 

The drug violence in Mexico has been a huge problem recently, but technology is allowing citizens new ways to combat the problem in the absence of effective governance. 

 


Via Richard Petry, Seth Dixon
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Interactive maps Mexico-USA migration channels

Interactive maps  Mexico-USA migration channels | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
In several previous posts we have looked at specific migration channels connecting Mexico to the USA: From Morelos to Minnesota; case study of a migrant...

 

An excellent way to show examples of chain migration and the gravity model...students will understand the concepts with concretes examples. These interactive maps have crisp geo-visualizations of the migratory flows.


Via Seth Dixon
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Grant Graves's curator insight, September 11, 7:39 PM

Mexico is the largest source of immigrants to the United States. In this way, tens of thousands of Mexicans citizens become American citizens every year, making up a larger and larger percentage of of the US population. However, at the same time, many Mexicans are unable to immigrate to the US due to quotas and other immigration laws. In this way, many Mexican Citizens have no choice but to stay in Mexico or cross the border illegally. I believe that the US should remove quotas and many immigration laws. If this could be done, citizenship could be given to all who want it, making more US citizens and stimulating the US economy by bringing in more jobs and tax dollars. This is due to the simple fact that illegal immigrants do not or cannot pay taxes.

Cam Morford's curator insight, October 13, 10:14 PM

Very interesting article and map regarding Mexican migration.  I'm not very familiar with Mexican states, provinces, or cities, but someone who is would find this article interesting.  It talks about each province in Mexico, how many people emigrate away from there, and where they immigrate to. 

Irvin Sierra's curator insight, October 14, 10:51 PM

This relates o the topic that we are talking about in class because it has to do with migration. This topic is showing us how many people from Mexico come to the US especially more from Morelos. I didn't think that most Mexicans would come from that sate. That's what makes it interesting because I thought that more people would migrate to the US from other parts of Mexico. Like i know a lot of people from here in Longmont who are mostly from Durango and even from Guanajuato, from where i am from. My dad actually migrated from Mexico to the US and well basically i did too as well as my mom except for my sister. My dad wanted to Migrate here so that he could have a better job and life for him and us. It sucks how the number of migrants from Mexico have slowed down, because most of the undocumented people and just the ones who come from Mexico are helping the U.S with the population as well as the jobs around here.