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Mexico's 'maquiladora' labor system keeps workers in poverty

Mexico's 'maquiladora' labor system keeps workers in poverty | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"Some four decades after welcoming foreign assembly plants and factories, known as maquiladoras, Mexico has seen only a trickle of its industrial and factory workers join the ranks of those who even slightly resemble a middle class." 

 

Despite making such consumer goods like BlackBerry smartphones, plasma TVs, appliances and cars that most people in the US, for instance, consider necessities, Mexican workers in these factories seldom get to enjoy these items because, as this article argues, the labor system keeps them in poverty.  Foreign investment in these businesses keep unions out and attracts workers from poorer areas, allowing low-cost labor to prevail.  Less than $8 a day is the going wage - great for the bottom line and consumer prices but very bleak for those who toil in this system.


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Olga Varlamov's curator insight, November 23, 2013 8:26 PM

This article talks about how the maquiladora labor system dosen't provide enough money for it's workers. Many in Mexico are living in poverty and can't afford much more than dinner because of their low wages.

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, February 4, 2014 12:47 PM

The labor system keeps workers in Poverty. This is the argument that is transitioned by stating the fact that many factory workers are and will always remian in poverty if they have no oppurtunity to move up in the food chain and become educated in order to get themselves out of poverty. They need different skills in order to aquire a better job to create a better life.  

Edgar Manasseh Jr.'s curator insight, February 11, 11:33 PM

Its a very sad situation reading this. Seeing people go through all this to just survive. Kids don't even get any education and follow their parents footsteps to work at a plant just to be able to pay for bills. 8 dollars a day, and you wonder why they try to run to united states. Its very unfortunate that a lot of people go through this and i hope it changes soon, because to see that this is going on makes me thankful for what i have around me. Foreign investors are not great as they set out to be take advantage of the poor and get rich out of it, i think its pretty ridiculous.

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Brazil: Protests & Demonstrations

Brazil: Protests & Demonstrations | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"Protests are ongoing in Brazil as people took to demonstrating against high World Cup spending....the unrest is the worst the nation has seen in two decades."


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Nathan Chasse's curator insight, February 28, 2014 10:18 PM

These pictures show some of large scale protesting that occurred last year due to public transport fare and tax increases. The people are angry how little the government is helping with public education, healthcare, security, and transportation. The apparent cause of the tax increases was to help Brazil host the World Cup soccer games this year, which has caused the people to believe that their government cares more about soccer than them.

 

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, October 30, 2014 8:07 PM

With all eyes on Brazil, the country is showing the world that it is more than just the world cup. Having protests in the media, Brazil is seen as a more than just a country with beautiful scenery and one with unrest due to political corruption and tax increases that effect the entire country.

Kevin Cournoyer's curator insight, May 6, 8:49 AM

These pictures show the other side of something that most of the world was looking forward to and enjoys. Just as with the Sochi Olympics, the World Cup in Brazil was not only an international event that was internationally important, but it was a local event for Brazilians as well, that had real impacts on their lives. Unfortunately, governments and corporations often fail to recognize or choose to ignore the ramifications of their enterprises on the everyday citizen. On the flip side of increased revenue in the form of tourism and foreign investment is increased government spending and likely higher taxes to fund an event that many Brazilians may not have even been able to attend. 

 

So while Brazil was the center of international attention, at least for a short time, the media did not show the rest of the world the unrest and unhappiness in the country. Instead, they focused on what teams might be playing in the World Cup and which team would likely win. They did not discuss or mention the protests that occurred because it would not bring in the desired ratings or money. The media, therefore, helped to facilitate a disconnect between global and local. In a global context, Brazil was the host of the World Cup and was preparing for one of the most important events in the most popular sport in the world. In a local context, however, Brazil was a nation rife with unrest regarding high government spending on an a sports tournament. That money could likely have been better spent somewhere else, but since that would not have fulfilled the immediate desires and goals of the Brazilian government, ordinary Brazilians were forced to suffer the consequences. 

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The Top Ten Places to Visit in South America

The Top Ten Places to Visit in South America | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
South America is a land of natural exotic beauty that will leave you speechless, a land of mystery and great historic importance. If you make a trip to the southern hemisphere, be sure to include these precious gems.

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Lora Tortolani's curator insight, February 12, 6:40 PM

I can't wait to travel the world!

Edgar Manasseh Jr.'s curator insight, February 14, 7:45 PM

South America is the best place to go and visit. Geographical stature is beyond amazing. I hopefully will go there one day for a honeymoon or something and avoid this horrid northern weather.  I have some friends from ecuador and she tells me that some areas in south america whether it be brazil, peru or any other location and there are areas that would leave you with your mouth open. Alot of beautiful landscapes, and alot of endangered species

Lora Tortolani's curator insight, February 19, 9:17 PM

I love to travel and I'm a huge fan of mountains.  Tierra del Fuego here I come. 

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What we can learn from Mexico

What we can learn from Mexico | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

Earlier this month, the president told a newspaper the solution to partisanship is politics and more politics.


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Amanda Morgan's curator insight, September 29, 2014 2:18 PM

The facts about the "new" Mexico help in reasoning why less people are migrating.  The new Mexico looks hopeful and prosperous but when you read about the affects of the drug wars and violence, we see that there is still room for progress for the country in order to keep their citizens from leaving Mexico.

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 16, 2014 5:17 PM

A few weeks ago, the president told a newspaper the solution to partisanship is politics and more politics. That’s how you work toward the building of agreements. Unfortunately, it wasn't Barack Obama. It was Mexico’s Enrique Pena Nieto. One of the first things Pena Nieto did after assuming office was to announce a pact for Mexico, an ambitious set of reforms to raise taxes, increase competition and take on the teachers’ unions. While the world has gotten used to a torrent of images and news of drug-related violence from Mexico, another side of this country has been quietly developing. What we can learn from Mexico is that they are quite successful.  Mexico’s GDP is expected to grow by nearly 4 percent this year, twice as fast as Brazil or, for that matter, the United States. It is riding a manufacturing boom. Mexico is now the world’s fourth biggest producer of cars, according to the World Trade Atlas. Starting next year, new taxis in New York City will carry a “made in Mexico' label.” Mexico is also the world's top exporter of flat screen TVs. In fact, Mexico exports more manufactured products than all the other countries in Latin America combined. A major factor that comes into play is geography.  Sharing a border with the United States means heavy products are cheaper to transport across than if they were manufactured in, say, Asia. Nieto continues to inform us what we can learn from Mexico.

Kendra King's curator insight, February 2, 8:37 PM

The title of this article was what enticed me as I was hoping to find an actual answer. However, based on this article alone, I don’t actually think there is much the United States can learn from Mexico about politics or economics.

 

This author failed to mention that a difference in political systems could also attribute to the new Mexican leader’s ability to obtain “endorsements from across the spectrum.”  Mexico recently had an election. The new President this article is praising is part of a party that controlled the land for 70+ years until Nieto's predecessor. His predecessor messed up with the cartels so badly that Nieto was elected back into office. Given the amount of support Nieto had going into office, it doesn't seem so challenging to negotiate with opposing parties. Plus, I doubt the opposing parts are as unreasonable as some of the United States members of congress, like the Tea Party.   

 

I also see little to glean from the manufacturing route that Mexico is on at the moment. I will admit that the projected GDP growth of 4% mentioned in the article is impressive. However, thinking that the key to economic growth in the United States is through a similar “manufacturing boom” is just out of touch with the times. As stated in class our wages can’t keep up with the cheaper wages of developing countries (a point the author eluded to in the section discussing “the three main factors at play,” factor number three). Thus, doing what Mexico is doing doesn’t fit the American economy. What the United States might try doing is finding a manufacturing niche that no one has a market on in order to obtain more jobs. Maybe something higher end or medically related would be of benefit to the United States. Even these jobs would end up comprising a small part of the United States economy because the United States is more of a white collar economy. As such, more should be done to protect that sector of our economy from things like outsourcing given its relevance to our modern economy.

 

 Overall, I think the media’s quick comparisons of other countries falls under the bad category of globalization. A fair amount of people would just use this article to say things like, if Mexico’s leader can do X Y & Z then so should Obama. Yet, many of those people wouldn’t actually think about all the differences or reasons why Obama can’t compromise or revert the economy backwards. Am I saying Obama shouldn’t try more or that I am happy with the lack of compromise by all, no. However, I think it is dangerous for journalist to gloss over the situation since many people will take them as a credible source to cite. Mind you not all journalism is bad though. The Scoop.It article I read this week regarding Walmart is a great example of how investigative journalism can have positive consequences. The major difference being one actually did their homework that cited concrete specifics, while the other made a flimsy analogy.  

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Landfill Harmonic


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Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 14, 2014 7:02 PM

This video shows that even thoughts living in absolute poverty are able to create beautiful things. While the instruments are clearly made from trash the music they produce is almost impossible to tell apart from expensive proper instruments. The ingenuity of these people is remarkable and really an incredible thing to watch.

Louis Mazza's curator insight, February 12, 7:02 PM

Here in Cateura, Paraguay the inhabitants live on a landfill. the quote in the begining of the video says, "the world sends us garbage, we send back music", and it couldn't be more accurate than that. citizens recycle the garbage and sell it. it is very inspiring to see these people make the best of their situation, when a lot of people in America complain about traffic, and menial problems. While going through the trash a violin shell was found which sparked imagination. people started to make instruments like violins, flutes, and cellos. Cateura now has a whole recycled orchestra that makes beautiful sounds. hearing and seeing this wonderful progress from thrown away items, i wonder what Americans could produce with the trash that is thrown away here. with the highest point in RI the Johnston Landfill, we must have some good trash. 

Norka McAlister's curator insight, February 14, 7:54 PM

It is amazing on how these slum residents have a brilliant idea in how to convert waste and trash into a gorgeous music. Imagination plays a giant roll into poverty. People need to subsist and imagination makes this possible by taking anything in their environment and having it serve a particular purpose. The high percentage of contamination in this pollute field is another pressing matter, however this issue does not stop residents from pursuing their dreams. Enhancing their skills in music by making musical instruments out of trash, allows them to escape from their problems. In this little town in Paraguay, poverty and excess waste is prevalent in this society, but the residents take advantage of their waste polluted fields and make musical instruments out of what they find in them. Furthermore, this ingenuity helps children and improves their overall quality of life.

 

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Belize: A Spanish Accent in an English-Speaking Country

Belize: A Spanish Accent in an English-Speaking Country | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
BELIZE has long been a country of immigrants. British timber-cutters imported African slaves in the 18th century, and in the 1840s Mexican Mayans fled a civil war.

 

Belize has a much higher Human Development Index ranking that its Central American neighbors such as Guatemala.  That fact alone makes Belize a likely destination for migrants.  Given that Belize was 'British Honduras' during colonial times, English is (still) the official language, but that is changing as increasingly Spanish-speaking immigrants are changing the cultural profile of Belize.        


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Rachel Phillips's curator insight, February 12, 6:05 PM

As an American, I've never really thought about immigration to places other than the U.S., but this really opened my eyes.  It's a bad situation.  These people need their jobs, and need the money, but the immigrants are scooping all of that up.  Immigration is such a large occurrence that the language spoken in Belize is actually changing.  It's gone so far that politicians are pitching in to help immigrants just to help themselves.  In a way, it's absurd, and shocking, at least to me, that the government is just welcoming this while the citizens seem to be so against it.

Kendra King's curator insight, April 14, 11:40 PM

Belize is becoming more Spanish speaking due to their influx of migrant immigrants. According to the article, “Belize now has more native speakers of Spanish than of English.” As such, knowing how to speak two languages is a huge benefit to those working in the service sector. Given that this sector is one that both migrants and natives partake in, it makes sense. Thus, making Spanish classes mandatory for the native non-migrants is actually a smart economic move that ensures the students will come out with practical skills. It may seem odd that English is still the primary language taught in school given the importance of Spanish, but it isn't. My guess is that most of the migrant Spanish speaking workers are not in school . The article mentioned most of the migrants are moving into rural areas where they work in the the fruit fields. Such jobs do not requite a lot of education. So without the Spanish speaking population present in the school system, there isn't much of a reason to change the primary language of the school. Therefore, adding Spanish as a class is the best move given the populations needs.  


Conversely, the ethnic relations in the country is something I do not full grasp. The author's insured the relationship between members of different ethnic groups are “generally good.” However, I would have liked more concrete proof of this assurance.  To me the evidence the author provided could just end up causing more tensions. For the author assured the groups were getting along   because politicians weren't divided on ethnic lines and as such were giving free land to new migrants. The land wasn't going to the other members of the population because it is not in their character to ask. While it might not be in there character to ask for help, they could resent others actually taking the help. Especially if this gives an economic advantage. Now I could be wrong, but in countries where the minority challenge the majority things get unpleasant as discussed in class when looking at Europe and the Untied States. Given the developmental differences of these regions, the comparison may be inaccurate. However, until I hear more about how the groups actually feel towards each other, I am going to remain critical of the author's statement that all is good.   

Rachel Phillips's curator insight, April 16, 4:26 PM

I find it really interesting that so many immigrants are so welcomed by politicians, who actually pay immigration fees just to gain votes.  It's also intriguing that politicians "give away" land, and that so many people are moving away from cities, while the rest of Central America is moving into the cities. this is kind of an odd tactic, atleast from the view point of an America, because if an American politician did these things for immigrants, most Americans wold absolutely refuse to vote for them.  However the issue of immigration and locals being "too proud" to get governmental help, whereas immigrants will "stand in line", seems to fall right into place with how many view immigration in America, so it's relatable.

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Photo of the Day-Iguazu Falls

Photo of the Day-Iguazu Falls | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
See a photo of Iguazu Falls in South America and download free wallpaper from National Geographic.

 

Beautiful image!  South America's equivalent to the Niagara Falls is a place that students should see.


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Cam E's curator insight, February 11, 2014 11:11 AM

I'm adding this to my list of places to go right away! I intend to visit most of the countries in the world in my lifetime, and this just happens to be on the border of two of them. It's a really cool sight even apart from its natural topography. It looks like the border is almost like a gap in the Earth itself. It reminds me a bit of how the Grand Canyon is a divide  close to the borders of Utah, Nevada, and Arizona.

 

Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, February 11, 2014 12:11 PM

This image of Iguazu Falls in South America is just another visual example of how beautiful the world is!

James Hobson's curator insight, September 29, 2014 10:12 PM

(South America topic 3)

What a perfect photo for "National Geographic"! As is the case with many of its other cover or insert photos, it shows what many have seen before (or similar to it), includes a human element in some way, but is taken from an unusual angle or distance. As another example of the pattern I'm noticing, I took a random National Geographic off my bookshelf. The cover shows the Statue of Liberty (a well-known landmark), Manhattan skyscrapers (the human element), but as would be seen from underwater (the unusual perspective). It's something about seeing something familiar from an unfamiliar perspective that makes one stop and reimagine the scope of whatever it is they have experienced.

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2014 World Cup: Will Brazil Be Ready?

ESPN Video: With the FIFA World Cup two years away, will Brazil be ready to host soccers premiere event?

 

This short sports documentary (12 minutes) looks at some of the socioeconomic and urban planning issues that are a part of the logistics for a country to prepare for a sporting event on the magnitude of the World Cup.  The discussion of demolitions in the favelas (squatter settlements) is especially intriguing.  Major sporting events of this magnitude that last for two weeks can reshape local geographic patterns for decades.  

 

Tags: sport, Brazil, planning, squatter.


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Brett Sinica's curator insight, October 1, 2013 5:11 PM

I know my soccer, and I know Brazil knows its soccer considering the country has one of the richest histories in the world.  The nation eats, sleeps, and breathes the beautiful game and to host a World Cup right now is immaculate timing.  Some of the best players (possibly ever) in the world would be playing next year, all from star-studded nations.  The forecast for this spectacle will surely be one of the best in history, but that's if it all goes to plan.  There's been many videos and articles of Brazil coming into more problems than solutions.  Repairing and even building new stadiums have set back schedules and have even angered many locals.  In some cities, there have been cases of gentrification, places such as favelas have fell victim.  Being such a passionate fan of the sport, it's almost upsetting that all of these people are being misplaced to house the tournament which has been anxiously waited on since 2010.  The main picture says it all with the three hands covered in blood...  A nation which cares so much about a sport, where it is a way of life and prosperity, is in fact doing more harm than good in some areas.  In the end I hope Brazil can get back on schedule, and leave as little people harmed in the process so the world can enjoy one of the greatest sporting events come summer of 2014.

Ashley Raposo's curator insight, December 19, 2013 12:16 AM

The World Cup is getting closer and all eyes are on Brazil. The Favelas are seeing the worst of it. To improve their country for it's soon to be influx of tourists, the Favelas are going through practically forced renovations. Not to mention safety hazards in Brazil are being pushed to the limits with the building anf remidelling of the soccer stadiums. Just last month 2 construction workers part of the rebuilding were killed by an accident. The question is especially true. Will Brazil be ready? Soccer fans around the globe sure hope so.

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Protests and the World Cup

Protests and the World Cup | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Fury, anarchy, martyrdom: Why the youth of Brazil are (forever) protesting, and how their anger may consume the World Cup.

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Steven Flis's curator insight, December 17, 2013 5:48 AM

(Sidebar I used this article while gathering information for my research paper). Even though this is happening in Brazil i would like to beleive that this is exaclty what the United States founding fathers would of wanted us to do if our goverment was blatanly mistreating us like the politicians in Brazil. The youth of brazil realized what a moumentus occasion this was and didnt waste their chance to show the world their problems which forced the hand of the politicians into a political reform. Great example of how can make a difference if you have enough followers.

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 4, 2014 2:08 PM

This is about so much more than the World Cup. It is protest against government corruption and politicians lining their pockets with money under the guise of public works.

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, September 29, 2014 3:01 PM

When construction was occurring for the World Cup, a friend of mine was teaching in an extremely poor area of Brazil.  Seeing his pictures compare to the ones on ESPN really opened my eyes to the immense poverty gap.  Yes, soccer is major for Brazil and is extremely profitable however we see here a moral issue.  Billions spent on something as trivial as a sport, when millions are living in extreme poverty. Regardless of how serious people are about sports at the end of the day it means nothing when the country is comfortable with using billions to fund a recreation rather than feed their own people.

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Eduardo Paes: The 4 commandments of cities

TED Talks Eduardo Paes is the mayor of Rio de Janeiro, a sprawling, complicated, beautiful city of 6.5 million.

 

What should city planners be doing to maintain a vibrant city?  The Mayor of Rio de Janeiro explains his vision for cities and city management for the future. 


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Rio’s shantytowns are finding a place on city maps

Rio’s shantytowns are finding a place on city maps | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
RIO DE JANEIRO — Look at most maps of Rio de Janeiro. The beaches are easy to spot, as are the iconic ocean-front neighborhoods of Copacabana and Ipanema. In the middle is a vast forest.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 25, 2013 11:40 AM

A nonprofit organization run by current and former favela residents called Redes da Mare has started the first mapping program to systematically chart out the favelas for municipal governments.  We take for granted what having an address on a named street means in a modern society; it is a portal to public utilities, recognition with businesses and countless other social benefits.  Being left 'off the map' is synonymous with being left behind.  By finding their way on the city maps they are removing some of the social stigma that sought to treat them as if they did not exist.  


Tags: Brazil, urban, squatter, mapping

Caterin Victor's comment, January 26, 2013 2:06 PM
Even the shanty-towns are beautiful in Brazil
chris tobin's curator insight, February 21, 2013 3:06 PM

Being left off the map is ludicrous.  It should be surprising how many there are,what they pick for addresses, and population statistics. Hopefully this will also help them to get aid for poverty relief.

 

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Favela Images

Favela Images | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
I love these favela images by Fernando Alan.
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Hector Alonzo's curator insight, October 24, 2014 9:29 PM

These images of the Favelas in Brazil are absolutely amazing. Not only does it show the poor urban parts of the city are, but just how hard it is to live in these areas, as well as, the clustered so many houses are. The largest picture shown seems like a painting and not a picture, which makes the pictures more fascinating to look at.

Edgar Manasseh Jr.'s curator insight, February 14, 7:53 PM

Favelas are very important part of Brazil because it shows what culture Brazil identify. Ideologically Brazil is known as a beautiful place with beautiful beaches and beautiful people and world wide known soccer location. Favelas are having trouble with urban planners, and mudslides so its very difficult to live up on a mountain for free without consequences but that's whom Brazilians are as they show that without the government not helping them out they will strive to do whats best for not only themselves but their families.

Rachel Phillips's curator insight, May 7, 1:28 PM

This reminds me of seeing an aerial view of the suburbs, except low class.  It's row after row of houses that look pretty much the same, all small and box like.  In America, we don't see anything like this.  Even our poor neighborhoods aren't set up like this.  It's very cramped, and some of these houses look like they are falling apart, like the wind could blow them over.  You really can't even see streets, which makes me wonder what it's really like to live there, and how they manage to fit all those people so close together.

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Power of Place

Power of Place | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Explore educational and professional development resources for teachers and classrooms on Annenberg Media's learner.org. Companion to the Annenberg Media series Power of Place.

 

Maquiladoras, outsourcing, migration and regional differences within Mexico are main themes in this video.  This is a resource of videos that many are very familiar with, but this is worth repeating for those not familiar with the Annenberg Media's "Power of Place" video series.  With 26 videos (roughly 30 minutes each) that are regionally organized, this be a great resource for teachers. 


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Jessica Rieman's curator insight, February 4, 2014 12:59 PM

During this video you can distanctly see the differences between the outsourcing that Latin American had to do in order to surivive with their goverment the way it was and also how the mirgation came into play by which groups of people migrated to specific regions and what made them move there. Regional differences are also a major factor because of the regions and how they have progressed theought time and what will happen in the future.

miya harris's curator insight, September 10, 2014 9:46 AM

This video talks about the migration in Mexico and the reasons the people had for migrating. At the beginning of the video it talks about border patrol and people trying to illegally  cross the border from Mexico to America. When border patrol wrote up the reports they had to record what city the people came from and that helped geographer Richard Jones with his research plan to find out what regions were driving people out of Mexico.

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Haitian 'invasion' in rural America

Haitian 'invasion' in rural America | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Over the past 18 months thousands of Haitians have flocked to a small town in rural North Carolina.

 

This video is filled with geographic content.  How does immigration change the cultural and economic profile?  While large cities are typically the destinations for migrants why are these Haitians coming to this small town? 


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Nathan Chasse's curator insight, February 8, 2014 5:52 PM

This video is about a sudden influx of Haitian immigrants in a small rural town in North Carolina. This is not typical because because immigrating to the United States usually means settling in cities.

 

The atypical destination is the result of where job availability is currently located in the United States. Many of the immigrants had originally tried Florida and found either little work or much worse conditions in a city like Miami. In this rural area of North Carolina, there were some grueling factory jobs (I worked one once, they suck but the pay was not awful) that weren't being filled so the Haitians simply went where the jobs were. Filling the jobs that weren't being filled can only be good for that local economy and signs of Haitian culture are cropping up in the form of restaurants and church services. Unfortunately, poverty is a problem for these immigrants but being in a rural area means the cost of living is likely lower so there may be a better quality-of-life for them there than a city so long as the jobs last.

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Migrants’ New Paths Reshaping Latin America

Migrants’ New Paths Reshaping Latin America | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
In Mexico and Latin America, old migratory patterns are changing as migrants move to a wider range of cities and countries, creating regional challenges and opportunities.

 

Diffusion and patterns of migration are by their nature, going to be fluctuating.  Whether and why people stay or go, has profound impacts on the human geographic landscape of a variety of regions.  With less Latin American migrants coming to the United States and the Maquiladora zone of Northern Mexico, this has allowed southern Mexico and other countries to reap the benefits of maintaining portions of their most educated and entrepreneurial population. 


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WalkerKyleForrest's curator insight, September 16, 2013 10:10 AM

My insight on this would be how that Latin American countries have more educated people than other countries, then they spread to surrounding counties, providing many challenges and opportunities. Some opportunities would be that speading education would bring jobs. And the challenges would be the issue of mixing diversities, which could cause stds and gene mutations.- walker

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, February 6, 2014 11:46 AM

This article points out how when the pattern of immigration shifts it creates new challenges for the country of immigration, even if it is internal migration as opposed to external migration.  The path and flow of people moving from place to place can change the shape and nature of a country.  

Gareth Jukes's curator insight, March 24, 12:52 PM

Consequences of migration: socioeconomic, cultural, environmental, and political; immigration policies; remittances-

This article speaks of how migratory patterns are changing for illegal immigrants, and how it is causing problems. It states that as more countries and cities are exploited, their needs to be more jobs created. Sometimes, even new immigration policies are needed.

 

This article portrays the idea of consequences of Migration because it speaks of what those nations must do in order to thrive and survive the wave of illegal immigrants.