AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO
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AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO
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Migrant crisis: Neighbours squabble after Croatia U-turn

Migrant crisis: Neighbours squabble after Croatia U-turn | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Croatia reverses its policy on allowing in migrants and instead transports hundreds northwards, angering Hungary and Slovenia.

Via Seth Dixon
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Mark Hathaway's curator insight, October 9, 2015 9:58 AM

The influx of Syrian refuges has caused a major controversy  in Europe. The crises has ripped open the hotly debated topic of immigration into Europe. Many nations are refusing to take the refuges in. Hungary and Slovenia have been two of the most vocal opponents of letting migrants and refuges into Europe. They are continuing to hold to their closed borders policy. Both nations have become angered by the Croatian governments recent decision to reverse course and allow refuges into their country. This topic will continue to be debated in Europe. In the United States the issue of Syrian refuges has also become a political issue. President Obamas decision to take in some refuges has caused a political controversy to erupt. Some on the right, including Donald Trump have come out against opening American borders to the refuges.

Matthew Richmond's curator insight, October 26, 2015 1:02 PM

Croatia has reversed it's policy on the current migrant problem in Europe and the middle east. This is just a deplorable situation that seems to have no end in sight. While I understand the argument that other Islamic countries should be willing to take them, the current status quo simply can't be allowed to continue any longer.

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 13, 2015 2:08 PM

of course Croatia has decided to let people through. they can only suffer if they try to stop migrants at their border, especially when the migrants are trying to get to countries to the north. if we compare the cost of trying and failing to keep out migrants and the cost of busing them to the northern boarder, we may find that the cost is smaller when they simply bus the migrants to the boarder and forget about them.

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Flag wars

Flag wars | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"Mr Füzes had voiced support for the Székler people, a group of ethnic Hungarians who live in Transylvania, after two Romanian counties banned the display of the Székler flag (pictured above with men in hussar uniform) on public buildings. Zsolt Nemeth, Hungary’s state secretary for foreign affairs, described the ban as an act of “symbolic aggression” and called for local councils in Hungary to show solidarity by flying the Székler flag from town halls. The Hungarian government then raised the Székler flag above Parliament, further enraging Bucharest..."


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Conor McCloskey's comment, April 30, 2013 10:26 AM
The past is the past. Or is it? The past seems to mean more to the people of Hungary and Romania these days. The Treaty of Trianon of 1920 sectioned the region of Transylvania from Romania to Hungary. For the ethnic Hungarians living in Transylvania, this posed quite the issue. For many people around the world, the homeland does not always match up with geopolitical boundaries of the country that they live in. While this identity crisis causes conflict for many groups of people all over the world, in Hungary the fight to regain greater-Hungary continues today.
This article also poses interesting questions of voting and citizenship. The Hungarian government granted citizenship beyond its borders, and jurisdiction, to ethnic Hungarians in Romania. What does this say about those Hungarians in Romania? Does it bring Hungary any closer to regaining the borders of the once Greater Hungary? Regardless of the questions of citizenship, such public and federal efforts to expand their borders and regain their ethnic population and homeland is doing more then turning heads. Look to this region for future conflict because the failure of geopolitical nations to represent ethnic homelands rarely ends peacefully.
John Peterson's comment, April 30, 2013 10:37 AM
This article helps to illustrate tensions that can be caused by seemingly simple acts within a society that is home to two conflicting groups. While flags do not have any actual influence or power in society, they are a source of emotion, and pride in ones nation and heritage. Because of the emotion that is tied with flags, it can be a very tense situation when the use of these flags is banned, or if these flags are taken down or destroyed. It is amazing how something so simple as a flag can bring about so much anger, and be the source of such bad blood and violence between different nations or ethnic groups. In the example given, there has been conflict for years, which was recently fueled even more over the use of a flag. While the act of displaying a flag is simply a display of loyalty, the actions of the Romanian government against this practice shows how although it is not a violent act, it can lead to very hostile actions and interactions.
Zakary Pereira's comment, April 30, 2013 4:12 PM
This article got me thinking. The tensions between Hungary and Romania seem trivial to me. The Romanians are the right ones in my opinion and the act of displaying the Székler flag about the Hungarian Parliament was plainly a theoretical middle finger to Romania. The more than a million Hungarians living in present day Romania relates to our unit on culture and nations/states. There is a Hungarian nation of people in Romania that the Hungarian government has now granted rights to, again purposely antagonizing Romania, and Romania is rightfully concerned of their dual-loyalty. Overall, the situation is taken way out of proportion by Hungary and what former piece of an empire wants that flag flown in their country. In Ireland do you see the Union Jack… that’d be a no.