AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO
6.5K views | +2 today
Follow
AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Vultures, Environment, and Mapping Trash

"For generations we vultures, armed with our senses, have fought in silence. We’ve waged a battle against garbage, but now we’re losing that battle. We want to help humans, so we’ve launched a movement to help you detect piles of garbage so that you can take action to eliminate them. Join us in this fight. Vultures Warn, you take action!"


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 23, 4:24 PM

This video is an introduction to a fascinating (Spanish language) website and project that uses GPS-tagged vultures to map out the urban trash hot-spots in Lima, Peru.  We look at vultures as the dregs of the food chain and ascribe moral filthiness to the species (just think of any number of movie, literary, and cultural references), but they are simply filling an ecological niche.  This mapping project is a way to use vultures nature in a way that allows for humanity to fix our trash production/disposal problems.    

 

Tagspollution, PerudevelopmentmappingGPSbiogeography, environment, environment modify, South America, land use, megacities, urban ecology, consumption.

 

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The Precision Agriculture Revolution

The Precision Agriculture Revolution | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"Thousands of years ago, agriculture began as a highly site-specific activity. The first farmers were gardeners who nurtured individual plants, and they sought out the microclimates and patches of soil that favored those plants. But as farmers acquired scientific knowledge and mechanical expertise, they enlarged their plots, using standardized approaches—plowing the soil, spreading animal manure as fertilizer, rotating the crops from year to year—to boost crop yields. Over the years, they developed better methods of preparing the soil and protecting plants from insects and, eventually, machines to reduce the labor required. Starting in the nineteenth century, scientists invented chemical pesticides and used newly discovered genetic principles to select for more productive plants. Even though these methods maximized overall productivity, they led some areas within fields to underperform. Nonetheless, yields rose to once-unimaginable levels: for some crops, they increased tenfold from the nineteenth century to the present.  

Today, however, the trend toward ever more uniform practices is starting to reverse, thanks to what is known as 'precision agriculture.' Taking advantage of information technology, farmers can now collect precise data about their fields and use that knowledge to customize how they cultivate each square foot."

 

Tags: technology, food production, agriculture, agribusiness, spatial, GPS.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Landon Conner's curator insight, November 3, 2015 8:57 PM

Our world has evolved and changed many ways in agriculture than it used to be. We've changed from horses pulling plows to using tractors with mowers on the back. Planting seeds by hand one at a time to using machines that can plant ten at a time five times faster. Watering plants one at a time to using water hoses. Our generation has advanced in farming technology and is helping our agricultural community. LDC

Cade Johns's curator insight, November 5, 2015 7:49 PM

Over the years agriculture has changed for the better,production has increased, pesticides have helped development,and technology has helped speed up the production and make the quantity bigger. CJ

Cade Johns's curator insight, December 2, 2015 9:57 AM

Agriculture has evolved very much over time to many different methods of growing things and theyve changed the way we affect the soil.-CJ

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from ApocalypseSurvivalSkills
Scoop.it!

Spatial Navigation Before GPS

Spatial Navigation Before GPS | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"Giant 70-foot concrete arrows that point your way across the country, left behind by a forgotten age of US mail delivery.  Long before the days of radio (and those convenient little smartphone applications), the US Postal service began a cross-country air mail service using army war surplus planes from World War I.  The federal government funded enormous concrete arrows to be built every 10 miles or so along established airmail routes they were each built alongside a 50 foot tall tower with a rotating gas-powered light. These airway beacons are said to have been visible from a distance of 10 miles high."


Via Seth Dixon, ApocalypseSurvival
more...
Giovanni Sonego's curator insight, December 15, 2013 1:49 PM

Adesso sembra incredibile che si usasse un sistema simile per guidare la posta aerea. Forse a quei tempi sembrava normale. 

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 16, 2013 3:14 AM

I love articles like this one where they talk about the collide of different times. This article speaks of huge concrete arrows which were left from 1930's air mail routes. sadly most of the towers that were paired with the arrows have been dismantled but still really cool that these directional arrows from the past can still be found almost 90 years later.

Elle Reagan's curator insight, September 28, 2014 11:44 PM

Wow technology has come a long way in just a short amount of time! We would still be using  those stone arrows if it wasn't for the invention of the GPS. 

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Think GPS is cool? IPS will blow your mind

Think GPS is cool? IPS will blow your mind | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
For all of its awesome applications, GPS has two fundamental flaws: It doesn't work indoors, and it can't really detect altitude. An Indoor Positioning System would fix that -- and introduce some seriously awesome applications.

 

Geolocation was listed as one of the important growth industries for the future (it also is a way to reassure students that the their are jobs for geography majors).  The IPS isn't quite here, but it's hard to imagine that is too far away. 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Matt E.'s comment, August 27, 2012 11:12 AM
This is pretty cool, i never thought of having a gps inside large buildings like malls
Jesse G's comment, August 27, 2012 11:24 AM
This would be very helpful when traveling to large indoor tourist attractions. Especially if you are with a group of people in a large museum and you get spilt up, you can locate each other easier.
Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Is GPS Ruining Our Navigation Skills?

Is GPS Ruining Our Navigation Skills? | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Relying on GPS devices can erode our ability to develop mental maps.

 

While GPS technology can help us in a pinch, relying primarily on a system that does not engage our navigation skills will weaken our ability to perform these functions.  While this intuitively makes sense, that the 'mental muscles' would atrophy when not used, it is a reminder that an overuse of geospatial technologies can be intellectually counterproductive.  

 

A distinction should be made between outdoor GPS usage (where the user receives data and makes navigational decisions) and vehicular GPS usage (where the computer typically will make all the decisions for you).  As long as you are a part of the decision-making process, you will be strengthening your navigationals skills.  In London cab drivers, they've discovered that their brains expand as they aquire 'the knowledge' of the city: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-16086233 ;


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's comment, August 27, 2012 12:16 PM
The brain is just like a muscle and if you turn over the spatial analysis part of your brain over to a machine, you lose the ability to understand spatial relationships in you own neighborhood.
Paige T's comment, August 28, 2012 2:25 PM
GPS devices can work as an easy, quick solution once in a while. However, we are becoming very reliant on them to the point where some people are watching the GPS rather than the road. I recently drove through a town for the second time and had almost no memory of where I was going because the first time around I used a GPS to navigate my way. Maps are great because you can not only plan out your route, but you can also easily see the surrounding area.
Daniel Lindahl's curator insight, March 20, 2015 5:54 PM

This article emphasizes that in recent years people have put a heavy reliance on their GPS systems. This is not a bad thing, but it means that people hardly ever look at maps anymore. By not looking at maps, people not only limit their spatial view locally, but also their ability to understand where places are on a global scale. This limits geographic literacy. 

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Intro to Geospatial Technologies for K-12

"Trying to get middle and high school students interested in careers in science and technology? This video is the first in a series targeted at students to show the what's on the cutting edge..."

Geospatial technologies explained simply, showing the potential jobs in geography.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's comment, November 17, 2011 1:17 PM
GIS should NOT just be the private domain of professors and govt. employees...the applications are endless.
Sarah Ann Glesenkamp's curator insight, August 18, 2014 7:39 PM

Unit 1

 

Rich Schultz's curator insight, November 18, 2014 1:49 PM

Fantastic area to get into - currently has a worker shortage

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Southmoore AP Human Geography
Scoop.it!

Latitude and Longitude of a Point

Latitude and Longitude of a Point | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Find the latitude and longitude of a point using Google Maps.

 

Simple, straightforward and easy to use.  All you do is point and click on the map to get latitude and longitude in both decimal degrees and DMS (degrees, minutes and seconds).  You can also quickly enter coordinates in either format an have the location displayed on the map.

 

Tags: GPS, mapping, location.


Via Seth Dixon, Mr. David Burton
more...
Wade Lytal's curator insight, August 26, 2015 4:23 PM

This can help with your homework assignment. 

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Paper maps still relevant even with computers, GPS

Paper maps still relevant even with computers, GPS | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"The president and owner of Mapping Specialists, David Knipfer, said maps are more prevalent in society now than they’ve ever been, from turn-by-turn direction apps, to restaurant searches, to social networks that pinpoint users’ locations. Maps aren’t going away, but people are learning to use them in a different way, Knipfer said."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Without mental maps, we’re lost

Without mental maps, we’re lost | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Elwood was a senior geographer working on the ground-floor of the very global positioning systems (GPS) and geographic information systems (GIS) he will throw up for discussion in his TEDx talk.

His question: Are we surrendering our innate mental map making abilities to technology and relying on and trusting it too much? And for TEDx audiences only, he’ll toss out ideas on ways to prevent that from happening.

 

Tags: mapping, GPS, cartography, TED, 201.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Jeff Cherry's curator insight, January 12, 2015 9:08 AM

The mind is a terrible thing to waste.

Wyatt Fratnz's curator insight, March 18, 2015 8:08 PM

This text tells about a geographer who exaggerates today's modern dependency of Global Positioning Systems and Mapping, and the importance of still developing a mental map. It is important because lack of reliance of our mental maps leads to a primal fear and increasing instances of the feeling of being lost. The challenge is presented of how we stimulate technology in our mental maps. 

 

This article describes technological and mental process of mapping and how we should use it in our everyday lives. This is important because it gives humans a sense of direction and tells us how to keep it.

Carlee Allen's curator insight, March 26, 2015 6:20 PM

This is an article that explains and adds on to the fact that we Americans have begun too reliant on technology. Keith explains how kids now a days don't have a geographical sense and how it is really going to hurt them in the future.

 

I thought that this article was interesting, because it is a pretty controversial topic and very relatable.

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Digital Map Error May Have Led To Minesweeper Grounding

Digital Map Error May Have Led To Minesweeper Grounding | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
A digital chart used by the minesweeper USS Guardian to navigate Philippine waters misplaced the location of a reef by about eight nautical miles, and may have been a significant factor when the ship drove hard aground on the reef on Jan.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Mark Trinidad's comment, January 24, 2013 4:29 PM
strong magnetic current??
Deborah Vane's curator insight, January 25, 2013 10:45 AM

Digital gone wrong. 

Mark Trinidad's comment, January 30, 2013 5:26 PM
well they are already warned by PCG but they have their own water line..
Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

How to Fool a GPS

What if you could use GPS technology to find your misplaced keys? How about if you could use that same technology to lie about where you were in the world or...

 

We know the common usages of GPS technologies.  As the accuracy of GPS data improves, how does this expand the potenial uses?  What are the ethnics and legalities of GPS tracking devices?  Just like hackers online alter the information with rely on, this video is an introduction to the analogous GPS spoofing technology.  This TED talk is a great exploration of the future of GPS technology and privacy issues. 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Ms. Harrington's comment, July 17, 2012 8:52 AM
The bit about neighbors tracking eachother is an example of the law not keeping up with technology and modernization. This is an interesting and complex issue that will come up again and again in the future, I am sure.
Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

China Seeks ‘Independence’ From GPS With Own Satellite Navigation Service

China Seeks ‘Independence’ From GPS With Own Satellite Navigation Service | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
A Chinese satellite navigation system began providing services yesterday as the nation seeks to end its “dependence” on the U.S.’s Global Positioning System, or GPS, the official Xinhua News Agency reported.

 

China's satellite geolocation system, Beidou, has become operational. It is believed to be accurate to within 10 meters, which beats the U.S. military's GPS (accurate within 20 m). Is this an economic move for China or a way become militarily independent from the U.S.?  How will this change geospatial intelligence?   


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

New Scientist TV: Why GPS is just a clock in space

New Scientist TV: Why GPS is just a clock in space | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"Thanks to GPS, planes, cars and cellphones can quickly be guided to any destination. The system uses a network of satellites, but how do they relay the correct coordinates from space?  GPS is just a big clock in space. By communicating with four time-keeping satellites, a GPS device can determine it's exact position."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.