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AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO
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Egypt, Ethiopia and Sudan sign deal to end Nile dispute

Egypt, Ethiopia and Sudan sign deal to end Nile dispute | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Three African leaders sign an initial deal to end a long-running dispute over the sharing of Nile waters and the building of Africa's biggest hydroelectric dam.

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Bob Beaven's curator insight, March 26, 2:40 PM

The Nile is a very touch subject for the countries involved in the deal, because they all believe that they have a right to it.  Historically, Egypt was associated most with the river, and the Ancient Egyptians even had many myths surrounding the river as the giver of life.  However, Sudan and Ethiopia are looking towards the river as something that can generate hydroelectric power which would be beneficial to these countries.  The reason why Egypt worries is because it believes that if too much of the river is diverted or blocked then it will not get enough water to sustain the country.  Keep in mind, Egypt is called the "Gem of the Nile".  I do believe that the treaty that was signed is a step in the right direction however, all the countries should be able to share the Nile and use it.  I would oppose the policy if it became detrimental to the survival of Egypt however.  The main factor of the project that keeps it from being destructive is that the river will only be slightly diverted (and  it is a tributary in question the Blue Nile).  Yet, like we have learned in class rivers are very touchy subjects for many nations, not just African ones.

Norka McAlister's curator insight, March 28, 3:20 PM

Three countries (Egypt, Ethiopia, Sudan) finally agreed upon Nile river distribution, ending the ongoing dispute. The building of the dam will  bring many jobs and opportunites to the residents of Ethoiopia. It will  benefit all residents who live near by the Nile river area. The construction of the hydroelectric dam in Ethiopia will benefit its regions. However,  regions upstream, like Egypt, are more concerned about the changes in the river pattern, environmental effects, and pollution due to the construction of the dam. Many people who live and are dependet on the river will have to look for opportunites somewhere else and there is predicted to be a massive migration of highly populated communities. Even when all three countries agreed upon the dam project, the Egyptian govertment wants to ensure that this will &not cause any harm to downstream countries& which is still their biggest concern of the future. 

Jared Medeiros's curator insight, Today, 4:43 PM

  Glad to see that these countries could come to an agreement on a very large issue.  The Nile is the lifeline for this part of the world and nobody takes its importance lightly or for granted.  This is the type of thing that could put countries at war with one another, so its refreshing to see countries in this part of the world working together to try to improve their livliehoods rather than kill each other over resources.

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The Ethiopian town that's home to the world's greatest runners

The Ethiopian town that's home to the world's greatest runners | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
What do Kenenisa Bekele, Tirunesh Dibaba, Derartu Tulu and Fatuma Roba have in common, apart from being Olympic gold medallists?

 

What is it about this place that has produced so many world- class runners?   This is a great profile of the "Town of Runners."


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Seth Dixon's comment, April 12, 2012 10:53 PM
And I was feeling proud of my 7.8 mile run today.
Matt Mallinson's comment, November 5, 2012 2:50 PM
It's amazing to me that some of the world's fastest runners come from such a poor place and a very misunderstood place. Good for them.
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Will Ethiopian dam dry up the Nile?

Will Ethiopian dam dry up the Nile? | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"Construction of the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam (known as Gerd) is now about 30% complete.  Once completed, in three years, it will be Africa's largest hydropower dam, standing some 170m (558ft) tall."


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Albert Jordan's curator insight, April 1, 2014 3:06 PM

In an area fraught with political instability, non state actors, and rebel groups all too willing to fight for power and the wealth that comes from it - it will be interesting to see how the conflicts shift over time as this dam gets closer to completion. Will Egypt attempt to sabotage it or will they take a more diplomatic approach and try to work with the Ethiopian government diplomatically again?  Perhaps Egypt will whisper in to the ear of Sudan or the various "rebel" groups in the region, considering diplomatic means have apparently failed so far. With Sudan's use of the Blue River also going to be affected by Ethiopia's damming, it will be interesting to see if a cooperation between Egypt and Sudan occurs. Perhaps Ethiopia would like to see a deeper conflict between Sudan and South Sudan, keeping their affected neighbor off balance.

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, April 16, 2014 6:47 PM

It is extremely difficult to divide a river. The Ethiopians will benefit immensely from this project but the Egyptians could lose everything if the Nile dries up. This is going to be a difficult problem to solve.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 3:45 PM

There is no way the whole Nile river is going to be dried up because of this damn. Ethiopia won't let that happen. To say that the river is going to have the same amount of water in it, thats not going to happen. Obviously the Gerd is going to have a huge impact on the water supply of the Nile but it definitely isn't going to dry up the whole thing!