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China’s hungry cattle feasting on alfalfa grown on Utah farm

China’s hungry cattle feasting on alfalfa grown on Utah farm | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
China has long depended on the U.S. breadbasket, importing up to $26 billion in U.S. agricultural products yearly. But increasingly, Chinese investors aren’t just buying from farms abroad. They’re buying the farms.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 6, 2:36 PM

Globalization is often described as a homogenizing force, but is also pairs together odd bed fellows.  A small Utah town near the Colorado border, Jensen is now home to the largest Chinese-owned hay farm in the United States. Utah's climate is right for growing alfalfa, and China's growing cattle industry make this a natural global partnership.  Large container ships come to the United States from China, and return fairly empty, making the transportation price relatively affordable.  While this might make economic sense on a global scale, local water concerns in the west show that this isn't without it's problems.  Water resources are scarce and many see this as a depletion of local water exported to China.  Some states see this as a threat and are considering banning foreign ownership of farmland.  This article shows the merging of various geographic themes: the global and local, the industrial and the agricultural, the human and the physical.         


Tags: agriculture, agribusinesstransportation, globalizationwaterChinaindustry, economic, physical, Utah.

Stephen Zimmett's curator insight, July 7, 7:41 AM
strong>Seth Dixon's insight: China buying farm land
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China publishes new map

China publishes new map | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
China has published a new map of the entire country including the islands in the South China Sea (West Philippine Sea) in order to "better show" its territorial claim over the region.

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Susan Kelly's curator insight, July 6, 6:22 PM

Seems like using a wikipedia entry to validate these claims.

Nancy Watson's curator insight, July 6, 7:01 PM

It seems that claims are often made to reinforce political claims. conflicting claims are difficult to resolve 

Kaylin Burleson's curator insight, July 7, 9:59 AM

Great for geographical discussions on why maps are important, how maps are used, etc.   

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China Turns To Africa For Resources, Jobs And Future Customers

China Turns To Africa For Resources, Jobs And Future Customers | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
In China's Second Continent, Howard French explores the Chinese presence in 15 African countries. The relationship goes beyond economics: more than a million Chinese citizens have migrated to Africa.

 

He says there's a debate about the long-term consequences of China's push into the African continent: Will it create development and prosperity, or will it lead to exploitation reminiscent of 19th-century European colonialism?

 

Tags: Africa, development, China, industry, economic, podcast.


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 30, 8:50 PM

This is an excellent podcast with many geographic strands running through it. 

Eli Levine's curator insight, May 31, 9:47 AM

Personally, I'm a little resentful that our money is being used to finance Chinese firms.  I'm also not happy that the Chinese aren't using local labor, which would boost economic activity in African societies.  I'm surprised if that's not more of a sore point for the people who live in these societies.

 

But anyway.

 

If we weren't so committed to spreading our political "religion" of democracy and Liberal values, we may have a shot at securing Africa for ourselves.  A pity that we're not as competitive a country as China.  However, if China wants to play international empire, I say let them.  They'll either do a better job than we've done or they'll be as corrupt and exploitative as we were and, thus, end their tenure on "top".  So long as we're able to defend ourselves over here, I see no reason to challenge the artificial empire of China.  That's just my interpretation of history.  Take from it what you will.

 

Think about it.

Bob Manning's curator insight, June 1, 8:43 AM

For Africa to develop, they need a better infrastructure.  China's investment in this area is allowing them access to the huge reserves of resources and growing labor pool.  Is this a repeat of colonialism?  Is there a way to do this in a sustainable manner that is mutually beneficial to both the Chinese and the African countries?

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China's Empty Cities House 64 Million Empty Apartments - YouTube

"Vast new cities are being built across China at a rate of ten a year, but they remain almost completely uninhabited ghost towns. Racing to stay ahead of the world economy, is the superpower about to implode?" 


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Faults in Xinjiang : Image of the Day

Faults in Xinjiang : Image of the Day | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Colliding continents and cracks in the Earth’s crust make for some remarkable scenery in western China.

 

Just south of the Tien Shan mountains, in northwestern Xinjiang province, a remarkable series of ridges dominate the landscape. The highest hills rise up to 1,200 meters (3,900 feet) above the adjacent basins, and they are decorated with distinctive red, green, and cream-colored sedimentary rock layers. The colors reflect rocks that formed at different times and in different environments.  When land masses collide, the pressure can create what geologists call “fold and thrust belts.” Slabs of sedimentary rock that were laid down horizontally can be squeezed into wavy anticlines and synclines. 

The ridge is noticeably offset by a strike-slip or “tear” fault in the image showing the Piqiang Fault, a northwest trending strike-slip fault that runs roughly perpendicular to the thrust faults for more than 70 kilometers (40 miles). The colored sedimentary rock layers are offset by about 3 kilometers (2 miles) in this area.


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Mathijs Booden's comment, February 8, 11:40 AM
Dit hoeft geen strike-slip te zijn. Het zijn hellende lagen, dus de breuk kan ook een op- of afschuiving zijn.
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Today Young Single Chinese People Will Spend Insane Money Online Shopping And Renting Fake Significant Others

Today Young Single Chinese People Will Spend Insane Money Online Shopping And Renting Fake Significant Others | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"Young single Chinese people celebrate themselves and prep for the holiday season China's biggest online shopping day of the year.."


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How Will China’s Bitcoin Boom Affect Online Retail?

How Will China’s Bitcoin Boom Affect Online Retail? | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
There's no doubt that digital currency Bitcoin has taken off in China, and companies are now eyeing its e-tail potential. (RT @JingDaily: How Will China's Bitcoin Boom Affect Online Retail?

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Wedding, Gangnam Style: S. Korea attracts affluent Chinese

Wedding, Gangnam Style: S. Korea attracts affluent Chinese | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

South Korea's tourism ministry estimates that more than 2.5 million Chinese visitors spent an average of $2,150 per person in 2012, more than any other nationality. That's helping companies such as iWedding, which is the largest of the South Korean wedding planners hosting Chinese tourists, to flourish.

 

"Chinese look up to South Korea for its sophisticated urban culture, style and beauty," said Song Sung-uk, professor of South Korean pop culture studies at the Catholic University of Korea in Seoul. "Rather than visiting traditional palaces or shopping for antiques, they would rather go to Gangnam to experience state-of-the-art shopping malls."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 15, 2013 6:46 PM

Tags: popular culture, South Korea, East AsiaChina, tourism.

Al Picozzi's curator insight, November 17, 2013 10:28 AM

Seems that the Chiese are skipping over their ally to head to South Korea for a better time.  Seems that international isolation really does have an effect on the domestic life, and toursim, in North Korea.  They really also want to just go shopping somewhere new and modern and see what just might be avaliable in their neighbor to the south.  Guess this time they won't be invading South Korea with an army, as in 1950, but with tourists.

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 23, 10:23 AM

I found this article very interesting because it seems so elegant for this new bride to have pictures takend and she has this new place where her and her husband are going to be getting married and then the article talks about where the best place is to go when these celebrations are happening. US Today talks about how it is not an elegant hillside or an ancient monument or even ruins that the newlyweds swarm to but the tony Seoul district made globally famous by South Korean rapper PSY's "Gangnam Style." "Helping shape that image is the popularity of South Korean cosmetics and fashion and the many South Korean stars whose looks are widely copied in China."

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China’s Great Uprooting: Moving 250 Million Into Cities

China’s Great Uprooting: Moving 250 Million Into Cities | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
A 12-year plan to move hundreds of millions of rural residents into cities is intended to spur economic growth, but could have unintended consequences, skeptics warn.

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Amanda Donecoff's comment, July 14, 2013 9:39 PM
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Amanda Donecoff's comment, July 14, 2013 10:24 PM
The people of China are on a downward slope, even though they are in a process of so much production. Their government has too much power and the people don't have enough say. The urbanization process in place is just another way to stop the people from speaking out or even inquiring about their own opinion. Moving everyone into cities is not going to help China expand or grow as much as they need to as a people in the long run. When you change someone into something they're clearly not, they can never aspire to their true potential. The country of China wants to prosper, but contradicts itself because the government is trying to take away a part of life that has been known to man for as long as anyone could probably remember, which is country; the rural lands that have always run across the Earth. The control and power that China is trying to acquire is not coming easy enough to them because they are too independent. They need to let places like the U.S. help build them and inspire them. Also, their plan for complete city life is not moving fast enough. People are unemployed and financially hurt. Even in 2025, people will continue to hurt and regret the decisions made. Sometimes the government can seem cold and unfeeling because they don't take all of the factors into consideration that they need to so they can thrive. Eventually, people need to come out and make decisions that are risky and outside the box to change the direction that their country is being led into. If China does not stop trying to control their people, and push them all into the city rather than the farming country, it could potentially become a place where people would rather die than be who they are. A great example of this is Foxconn. Many children have committed suicide because of the pressure put on them. Unfortunately, China chose the wrong solution. They didn't actually fix the core of the problem. Putting nets up around the buildings stopped some of the deaths, but it doesn't stop the workers or children from feeling so worthless that they shouldn't exist. China needs to make changes for their morality and for their future as a country with a lot of promise and potential. China and all of its people just need to use their power and ability for the right reasons, in the right ways.
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Beijing's Pollution

Beijing's Pollution | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

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Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 23, 11:18 AM

Beijing's Pollution is depicted throug this picture which shows that the factory is the equivalent of the "yello brik road" in this instance because it is where everything happens and where all the work is done and then the city landscape is depicted as cold in the dark grey scale. It depicts not only the spacial regognition but the actual, socitetal views on each place in relation to eachother.

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 3, 1:52 PM

It is a beautiful image until you read what it is actually depicting. It is very sad that a nation would choose money over the health of their citizens.

Glenn Cades Colada's curator insight, May 8, 4:36 PM

Beijing's pollution.

 

This is very interesting because it comes to show how humans have evolved and how they don't really care about the Earth's atmosphere.

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China's Water Crisis

China's Water Crisis | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
For years, China claimed to hold an estimated 50000 rivers within its borders. Now, more than half of them have abruptly vanished.

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Paige Therien's curator insight, April 25, 9:04 PM

China is attributing the disappearance of over 50 percent of their country's rivers to inaccurate sources; more effective technologies today give an accurate picture of China's waterways compared to the former data based off of sources from the  1950's.  While it is probably true to some extent that previous numbers were off, there still needs to be much concern for the state of China's current waterways and why waterways that once existed have disappeared.

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 3, 1:48 PM

Cutting corners in safety and cleanliness has caused pollution in the rivers. All the money they saved cutting corners now has to be invested in diverting clean water to northern areas of the country. I hope someday they realize that you cannot do things super cheaply without paying for it in another area.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 6:41 PM

What has happened to these rivers? Are they purposely being depleted from China? How do they expect to supply water for their residents if they are building things over these used-to-be rivers?

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Some manufacturers say 'adios' to China

Some manufacturers say 'adios' to China | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
The cost of doing business in China has been rising steadily, say companies that have returned to Mexico.

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Allison Anthony's curator insight, March 27, 2013 4:07 AM

What goes around, comes almost back around.  At least these jobs are getting closer to possibly returning to the US.

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China's taste for pork serves up a pollution problem

China's taste for pork serves up a pollution problem | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
No one asked the villagers of Houtonglong before the pig farm was built near their homes and their health began to suffer

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Allison Anthony's curator insight, March 19, 2013 9:42 AM

Check out this video clip.  China is the largest producer of pork in the world and has the domestic demand to back it.  It is taking its toll on farms and those who live near them in terms of pollution and health issues, however.

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Why China Will Reclaim Siberia - NYTimes.com

Why China Will Reclaim Siberia - NYTimes.com | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Like love, a border is real only if both sides believe in it. And on both sides of the Sino-Russian border, that belief is wavering. By Frank Jacobs.

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China's territorial claims

One of the geography videos embedded in this interactive map: http://bit.ly/KDY6C2


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 25, 10:13 AM

Suspicions between the People's Republic of China and its neighbors bedevil its boundaries to the east, south and west as shown in this videographic from the Economist.  This is one of the videos that I've put into my interactive map with over 65 geography videos to share in the classroom


Tags: borders, political, conflict, waterChina, East Asia.


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Shanghai's Global Ascendance

Shanghai's Global Ascendance | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

Reuters photographer Carlos Barria recently spent time in Shanghai, China, the fastest-growing city in the world. A week ago, he took this amazing shot, recreating the same framing and perspective as a photograph taken in 1987, showing what a difference 26 years can make. The setting is Shanghai's financial district of Pudong, dominated by the Oriental Pearl Tower at left, and the new 125-story Shanghai Tower, China's tallest building and the world's second tallest skyscraper, at 632 meters (2,073 ft) high, scheduled to finish by the end of 2014. Shanghai, the largest city by population in the world, has been growing at a rate of about 10 percent a year the past 20 years, and now is home to 23.5 million people -- nearly double what it was back in 1987. This entry is focused on this single photo pairing, with several ways to compare the two.


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Tony Hall's curator insight, March 6, 3:38 AM

Wow. This is amazing. The cynical side of me wonders what the costs have been for the people of the area. Not to mention the environmental costs.

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 15, 9:38 AM

It is amazing how quick a city can change in only 26 years. Since this picture was taken in 1987, the city's population has doubled, and is continuing to grow rapidly. Today, this city is one of the largest in the world and has magnificent skyscrapers, one of which is the second tallest in the world. It is obvious globalization hit this mega city very quickly, making it one of the most impressive cities in the world. 

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 6:37 PM

Buildings, skyscrapers and urbanization. Why not? This is how the world is and this is what attacks tourists. For Shanghai, they need to be up to par with all the other business and tech savvy countries and cities. This is how they are going to keep their technological business, by building what needs to be built. 

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China, India sign border defense pact

China, India sign border defense pact | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Agreement aims to ease tension on their contested border, as the two countries try to break a decades-old stalemate


China and India signed a deal Wednesday aimed at easing tension on their contested border, as the two countries try to break a decades-old stalemate on overlapping claims to remote stretches of the Himalayas. Beijing lays claim to more than 55,000 square miles disputed by New Delhi in the eastern sector of the Himalayas. In turn, India says China occupies about 24,000 square miles of its territory on the Aksai Chin plateau in the west.  Under the provisions of the new deal, the two sides will give notice of patrols along the ill-defined border to reduce the chance of confrontation, and will exercise "maximum self-restraint" should the two sides come face to face in areas where the line of control is unclear.


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Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 6, 1:18 PM

India and China, the two countries with the largest populations in the world. Both countries combined hold more than two billion people. Before this deal was signed, I could understand why tensions were high over their contested borders. Both countries want as much land possible, to compensate for their large populations. It appears this new deal should ease tensions between these two nations.  

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 6:08 PM

China and India are finally trying to be friends again. After both countries ended up in a stalemate decision over the Himalayas, they need this to refreshen and strengthen their relationship with one another. This new deal will allow new rules to take place on their borders and ease up the control as well.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 6:39 PM

China and India are finally trying to be friends again. After both countries ended up in a stalemate decision over the Himalayas, they need this to refreshen and strengthen their relationship with one another. This new deal will allow new rules to take place on their borders and ease up the control as well.

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In the East China Sea, a Far Bigger Test of Power Looms

In the East China Sea, a Far Bigger Test of Power Looms | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
In an era when the United States has been focused on new forms of conflict, the dangerous contest suddenly erupting in the East China Sea seems almost like a throwback to the Cold War.

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Mike Busarello's Digital Textbooks's insight:

China has been very aggressive in how they assert their territorial claims in both the South and East China Sea.  China is claiming control of the airspace of the East China Sea and the Senkaku Islands. While the U.S. government rejects this claim, they are encouraging commercial airlines to comply with China's request that all flight is this zone submit their flight plans to the Chinese government.  Japan, on the other hand, does not want the Chinese to have this as a symbolic victory that would further legitimize their political control over this space. 


1.Why does China care so much about some minor islands? 







2.Why would other countries not want to accept China's territorial assertions? 

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Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 4, 10:48 AM

None of the other countries that participate in trade in the South China Sea want China to have control over this area. It is obvious that they would not play fair and restrict access to all other countries.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 6:29 PM

There will always be problems with every country. China needs to focus on their new issues and deal with them properly.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 6:38 PM

There will always be problems with every country. China needs to focus on their new issues and deal with them properly.

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In Pictures: Heavy smog descends on China's northeast

In Pictures: Heavy smog descends on China's northeast | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

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China's first tourism law comes into effect, tourists issued manners guides

China's first tourism law comes into effect, tourists issued manners guides | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Travel operators in China have a huge new set of rules to follow now that the country's first tourism law is in place.

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In China, one-child policy compounds loss of child for parents

In China, one-child policy compounds loss of child for parents | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
One-child policy leaves some parents childless, hopeless and facing financial ruin in old age.

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Antonio Martinez's comment, September 12, 2013 12:36 PM
I can understand why this law is enforced. The obvious reason is that China has an unusually high population compared to other countries. Although, this law definitely has it's downsides. One being that if your child dies such as in the car accident in the beginning of the article, then you will be childless for the rest of your life.
jacob benner's comment, September 14, 2013 2:11 PM
China is overpopulated and it its becoming a problem, but by forcing parents to only have one child is leading to other problems. The childless parents describe there life to be empty and full of depression and without their child they are running into financial issues. Most of the time it is to late for the parents to have another child.
Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 15, 2:43 PM

I understand the issues China is having with their large population but the one-child policy hurts the average family. Problems occur when a family can only have one child. If anything were to happen to that child, whether he/she dies young, runs away or gets thrown in prison. That can leave the parents vulnerable later in life. When the parents become elderly they may not have a child to take care of them. China must find another way to control their population. 

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China's reliance on coal reduces life expectancy by 5.5 years, says study

China's reliance on coal reduces life expectancy by 5.5 years, says study | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

........"Linking the Chinese pollution data to mortality statistics from 1991 to 2000, the researchers found a sharp difference in mortality rates on either side of the border formed by the Huai River. They also found the variation to be attributable to cardiorespiratory illness, and not to other causes of death."

 

High levels of air pollution in northern China – much of it caused by an over-reliance on burning coal for heat – will cause 500 million people to lose an aggregate 2.5 billion years from their lives, the authors predict in the study, published in the journal the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.


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Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, November 29, 2013 6:44 PM

We talked in class about how certain poor working conditions or pollution emissions are permissible in countries whose laws allow for such situations, and how countries like the US arrange for certain work to be done in those countries.  This 'work' stuff all centers around an ever-necessary "profit" that exists as a carrot being dangled in front of a horse as it runs all of its life, blinded to everything else.  It is almost cartoonish, that for a percentage increase in profit due to minimalized expenses, a moral businessman might yield and give in to the temptation of exposing workers to dangerous conditions... or that all businesses might do the same thing... It is socially dangerous; a hazard like bullying, or cheating, using others as human shields to collect the damage while someone else collects the benefits.  I don't think that any life form should be exposed to such unfairness, because it just does not resonate with my philosophical consciousness that any individual should have a better life than another (or worse).  And why make it worse for someone?  Why pollute their areas?  Why steal their natural resources?  Why... Capitalism at all?  I do not think greed is innate to human nature, because selflessness does occur, and is often leaned towards in conventional modern morality/ethics.  I think that the vicious cycle that capitalism puts us in causes us to self-servingly run around like angry rats trying to feed ourselves, which causes us to take out risks on other people, and polluting other people's living space.  It really is sad, because this planet is alive... there is so much life on this planet, assumedly and debateably from this planet, this planet that we consider our home.  To be killing ourselves by not keeping our home clean and healthy is like a very bad habit- it's like smoking.  And it is taking a toll on the planet, as well as its inhabitants

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, April 12, 8:20 AM

This article and the accompanying resources describe the damage the pollution problem China has in its cities. China's economic desire to do things as cheaply as possible for the best profit margins has done significant damage to the air and now to its own people. By burning cheap coal to meet energy needs China has created a fairly toxic atmosphere in its Northern cities. The pollution is causing high rates of cardiorespiratory illness and even the government-controlled news can't keep quiet about the issue.

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 15, 2:28 PM

This article explains how China is burning an abundance of coal for heating. The Chinese population is over 1 billion; image the amount of coal that must be burned in order to supply heat for the people of northern China. Unfortunately, the burning coal is polluting the air and causing the Chinese to have lower life expectancies. China, along with other countries should start to find other ways to heat their homes. 

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This little piggy is going to China

This little piggy is going to China | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

This photoblog will also link you to a full article and video that explains how the American pork industry is supplying China's demand for protein as globalization forces (among others) has led the Chinese consumers to eat 10% more meat than they did just 5 years ago.  WHat impact will this have on American agriculture?  How to we explain fo the rise in meat demand in China?    


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Adrian Bahan (MNPS)'s curator insight, March 7, 2013 5:28 PM

Read the linked article. How is China dealing with its increasing appitite for meat?

Paige McClatchy's curator insight, December 14, 2013 2:30 PM

Chinese farmers cannot keep with with Chinese demand from pork, so America is stepping in to fill the gap. The globalization of American pork seems like it would benefit American farmers and Chinese consumers, but the environmental cost of raising so many extra pigs on American land must be considered, as well as transportation costs to ship it to China.

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China's one-child policy creates massive gender imbalance

The Chinese government says its so-called "one-child policy" has succeeded in reining in its population. But more than three decades after the policy's imple...

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Christina Dadaian's comment, July 5, 2013 1:13 PM
They'll have to balance out eventually. Either that or have the entire population suffer. It may take time but I imagine that things will correct themselves before it's too late.
Brooklyn McKenzie's comment, August 2, 2013 9:14 AM
It's kind of sad. I hope that those four brothers will some day find the love of their life. It must be pretty sad to see happy couples when you're single. Maybe one day things will even out.
Shelby Porter's curator insight, September 21, 2013 2:28 PM

This video gives a summary of the extreme consequences the "one-child policy" China has set in place. There are so many more men than women now, many are left to be bachelors for life. Many Chinese women are moving into the city looking for a rich and powerful man, and they succeed because there men are eager to marry. The Chinese have always had a preference for male children over female children. Now that the difference in population in so high, the government has made it illegal for doctors to tell parents the sex of their child before birth. This is a great example of the different kinds of culture that exist on the other side of the world. 

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Technology and Tradition Collide: From Gender Bias to Sex Selection

Technology and Tradition Collide:  From Gender Bias to Sex Selection | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"Every year, as a result of prenatal sex selection, 1.5 million girls around the world are missing at birth.  How do we know these girls are missing if they were never born? Under normal circumstances, about 102 to 107 male babies are born for every 100 female babies born. This is called the sex ratio at birth, or SRB."

 


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 25, 2013 12:23 PM

How do local cultures create these demographic statistics?  How do these demographic statistics impact local cultures? 


Tags: gender, technologyfolk culture, statistics, China, population.