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AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO
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Who Owns The North Pole?

"Though uninhabited and full of melting ice caps, the Arctic is surprisingly an appealing piece of real estate. Many countries have already claimed parts of the region. So who technically owns the North Pole? And why do these nations want it so bad?"


Via Seth Dixon, FCHSAPGEO
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 5, 2014 4:20 PM

Denmark is now being more assertive in their claimsWhy is this happening now?  As climate change threatens polar ice caps, some see the receding ice as an economic and political opportunity.  Canada, Russia, Denmark (Greenland) and the U.S. are all seeking to expand their maritime claims in the Arctic.  When trapped under ice, extracting resources is cost prohibitive, but the melting sea ice will make the Arctic's resources all the more valuable (including the expanded shipping lanes).  Even a global disaster like climate change can make countries behave like jackals, ready to feast on a dead carcass.  For more, read this National Geographic blogpost.  


TagsArctic, economic, environment, political, resources, water, sovereignty, coastal, environment depend, territoriality, unit 4 politicalclimate change, political ecology.

Rich Schultz's curator insight, January 2, 5:52 PM

Great question!  I think we all know the answer...Santa Claus!! ;)

Sammy Shershevsky's curator insight, January 17, 4:57 PM

The video discusses a big topic in discussion today - Who really owns the North Pole? Although the North Pole is uninhabited, many countries have claimed to take ownership of the vast majority of land (or, ice). Canada has already claimed that the North Pole is part of its nation. Russia has put up Russian flags on the North Pole (such as underwater) but does that really make North Pole a Russian territory? The media plays a role in this by offering different opinions on who should and who deserves the right to own the North Pole. You might read a Canadian article that lists all the outright reasons why the North Pole is or deserves to be a Canadian territory. 

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This Pulsing Earth

This Pulsing Earth | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Spring comes, then summer, fall and winter and if you are off the planet with a camera looking down at Earth, the seasons seem like breaths. Speed up the imagery, and the planet seems to pulse, like a living thing.

Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 15, 2013 11:00 AM

I'm sorry that this site cannot display the animated GIF version, but just follow the link to see how the seasonal rthymns of the climate and biomass pulsate (at a much slower rate than our bodies, but still a system with it's ebbs and flows).  


Tags: physical, remote sensing, geospatial, biogeography, weather and climate, Arctic.

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The 10 Stories You Missed in 2012

The 10 Stories You Missed in 2012 | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
2012 has had many stories around the globe have grabbed the headlines with their shocking tales.  Some of the most important shifts in the world however are incremental processes that happen slowly...

 

This article from Foreign Policy shares some great global stories that may end up impacting the coming years as well:  

 

1) India and Pakistan start trading more

2) Brazil becomes an immigration destination

3) Inuits strike it rich

4) A tropical disease nearly eradicated

5) The copyright wars go 3-D

6) The end of the Indian call center (Philippines)

7) Hong Kong fights back

8) Moscow on the Med (Cyprus)

9) Oil discoveries in Central Africa

10) Island dispute between Iran and UAE


Via Seth Dixon
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Kristen McDaniel's curator insight, January 4, 2013 9:57 AM

What was missed in the news?  Take a look at some of the stories from around the world!

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Dramatic Greenland Ice Melt

Scientists capture dramatic footage of Arctic glaciers melting in hours Scientists have captured dramatic footage of massive lakes in the Arctic melting away...

 

An amazingly extreme place that is far removed from inhabited regions of our planet, but still heavily impacted by people nonetheless.  


Via Seth Dixon
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Josue Maroquin's comment, August 12, 2013 10:10 PM
It shows us how humanity impacts the planet wherever we are
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Frozen Planet - An Interactive Exploration of the Poles

Frozen Planet - An Interactive Exploration of the Poles | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

Very cool way to explore the colder realms of our planet.  This web-based "Google Earth-like" resource comes preloaded with layers  (ice extent, temperature, permafrost, biogeography, etc.) that would make for a great interactive lesson for many grade levels. 


Via Carla Saunders, Seth Dixon
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What’s the deal with Antarctica and the Arctic?

What’s the deal with Antarctica and the Arctic? | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"Perhaps the biggest misunderstanding is that the Arctic and Antarctic are similar. One’s in the north and the other is in the south; but other than that, they’re the same, right? No, this couldn’t be more wrong. These polar opposites are literally polar opposites.
For starters, the Arctic is a small, shallow ocean surrounded by land: Eurasia, Greenland, Canada and the United States. It’s only about 5 ½ million square miles, which is five times smaller than the Atlantic and 11 times smaller than the Pacific. Antarctica, on the other hand, is a continent surrounded by the entire Southern Ocean.

This may seem like no big deal, but it makes all the difference in the world. It takes a lot of energy to change water temperature compared to what it takes to change land temperature, which means Arctic seawater isn’t as cold as the continental ice sheet covering Antarctica. So, the Arctic sea ice (frozen sea water) is about 10 feet thick, whereas the Antarctic ice sheet (compacted freshwater ice) is over a mile thick."

 

Tags: physical, weather and climate, Arctic, Antarctica.


Via Seth Dixon, Dustin Fowler
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Ruth Reynolds's curator insight, November 12, 2014 9:05 PM

It would be nice to keep both

Javier Antonio Bellina's curator insight, November 17, 2014 2:51 PM

If we are

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Out in the Great Alone

Out in the Great Alone | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
The Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race pushes participants to the brink on an unforgiving trek to the end of the world. And, as one writer who tracked the race by air discovers, that is exactly the point.

Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 25, 2013 2:06 PM

The Iditarod is as much about conquering the physical environment and harsh climates as any sporting event in the world.  This article about this famous Alaskan race also has a unique geo-visualization component to it that is worth exploring--it has a map showing where the action takes place in the article and as the reader scrolls through the article, the map changes and it highlights the progression along the trail.   


Tags: physical, weather and climatesport, Arctic, visualization.

chris tobin's comment, April 26, 2013 6:18 PM
very good story describing the long and dangerous trek. Its pretty amazing. I appreciated the video commentary and pictures of scenery and animals of the areas.
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The 10 Stories You Missed in 2012

The 10 Stories You Missed in 2012 | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
2012 has had many stories around the globe have grabbed the headlines with their shocking tales.  Some of the most important shifts in the world however are incremental processes that happen slowly...

 

This article from Foreign Policy shares some great global stories that may end up impacting the coming years as well:  

 

1) India and Pakistan start trading more

2) Brazil becomes an immigration destination

3) Inuits strike it rich

4) A tropical disease nearly eradicated

5) The copyright wars go 3-D

6) The end of the Indian call center (Philippines)

7) Hong Kong fights back

8) Moscow on the Med (Cyprus)

9) Oil discoveries in Central Africa

10) Island dispute between Iran and UAE


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Kristen McDaniel's curator insight, January 4, 2013 9:57 AM

What was missed in the news?  Take a look at some of the stories from around the world!

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Satellites Reveal Sudden Greenland Ice Melt

Satellites Reveal Sudden Greenland Ice Melt | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
NASA researchers are expressing concern about something they've never seen before: the melting of ice across nearly the entire surface of Greenland earlier this month.

 

Climate changes are afoot in the Arctic and the Greenland ice sheet.  For more on the Arctic. In related news, Texas and Louisiana have introduced education standards that require educators to teach climate change denial as a valid scientific position. South Dakota and Utah passed resolutions denying climate change. Tennessee and Oklahoma also have introduced legislation to give climate change skeptics a place in the classroom.


Via Seth Dixon
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Sarah Curtis's comment, September 3, 2012 3:33 PM
I didn't know how bad global warming was until I read this article and I don't think many people realize it either. We need to start changing our ways if we want to live in a safe and healthy environment. I think more people need to see images and read articles like this so they have a better knowledge on how little time we have.
Morgan Halsey's comment, September 10, 2012 11:30 PM
Some people still don't believe in global warming, but now with new technology, there is great evidence. New technology has allowed us to explore our world in ways that we have not been able to before. We are now able see things about our world and fix problems before they become worse.
Michael Grant's comment, September 12, 2012 4:12 PM
I am surprised about how the polar ice caps are melting and that global warming is very real, but on the other hand it's just part of the Earth maturing