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100 African Cities Destroyed By Europeans

100 African Cities Destroyed By Europeans | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"When tourists visit sub-Saharan Africa, they often wonder 'Why there are no historical buildings or monuments?'  The reason is simple. Europeans destroyed most of them. We only have a few drawings and descriptions by travelers who visited the places before their destruction. In some places, ruins are still visible. Many cities were abandoned when Europeans brought exotic diseases (smallpox and influenza) which started spreading and killing people. Most of those cities lie hidden. In fact the biggest part of Africa history is still under the ground."


Via Seth Dixon
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Sally Egan's curator insight, June 23, 6:52 PM

A great article looking at teh impacts of tourism on traditional cultures.

Hamdou Wane's curator insight, June 29, 7:53 AM

And so were the libraries and schools ...

wereldvak's curator insight, July 3, 9:24 AM

Wat er nu door IS en andere extremisten (helaas) wordt gedaan is min of meer ook door Europa gedaan ten tijde van het kolonisatieproces. Vernietiging, maar ook uitroeien van de volken door ziekten heeft voor dit verdwijnen gezorgd. Er ligt nog wel heel veel onder de grond, overwoekerd door de natuur.

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Egypt, Ethiopia and Sudan sign deal to end Nile dispute

Egypt, Ethiopia and Sudan sign deal to end Nile dispute | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Three African leaders sign an initial deal to end a long-running dispute over the sharing of Nile waters and the building of Africa's biggest hydroelectric dam.

Via Seth Dixon
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Lena Minassian's curator insight, April 8, 12:45 PM

This was an interesting read because I was not too familiar with this dispute. Three leaders have officially signed a deal to end a long dispute over sharing the Nile waters and beginning to build Africa's largest hydroelectric dam in Ethiopia. The three leaders are from Sudan, Ethiopia, and Egypt and signed the agreement in Sudan's capital city. Many feared that previous Dam's would worsen the water supply but this new Dam will give a more fairer share for everyone. These leaders assured that this new Dam will not cause any harm to the downstream countries but this project is still a ooncern for Egypt. The nile is the only source of water for some. Ethiopia has stated the the river will be diverted a little but will still follow it's natural course. Ethiopia is being backed up by many other countries as well.

David Lizotte's curator insight, April 10, 3:29 PM

The key of this article is that there has been an initial treaty signed. This agreement overturns a colonial era treaty which stated any countries upstream (south of Egypt) essentially had no right to touch the Nile in any way that would effect Egypt. They had veto power over everything. 

The reason behind this is that Ethiopia had overthrown there colonial power-Italy, in the 1890's-and was henceforth its own country. Another attempt to seize Ethiopia took place in the 1930's under Benito Mussolini's rule. Him being a fascist and wanting to be like Hitler and take everything certainly contributed to Mussolini wanting to take Ethiopia. Another contributing factor is the fact that Italy tried and failed in claiming/colonizing Ethiopia. They had lost in the battle field. Mussolini wanted to improve and prove Eastern Italian Africa's dominance. Ethiopia would be freed of Italy's rule during WWII and become its own country once again. In any case the article states the treaty designed by the British was set forth in 1929. Ethiopia was not part of British Africa, or a protectorate (in regards to what Egypt would become in relation to the UK), so Britain would not care about the Nile in Ethiopia, rather the Nile in Sudan and especially in Egypt. Any country upstream is to not obstruct or deter the natural flow of the Nile-a pivotal source for Egyptian civilization. 90 percent of Egyptians live within 20km of the Nile while a little over 50 percent live within 1km. It is clear Egypt needs the Nile in order to function.

Ethiopia is able to create jobs through the building of the dam and will also be able to employ people through dam maintenance, inspections, etc... for years to come (if the dam is built). The dam will also provide an immense amount of power/energy, truly benefiting the country. The article states Ethiopia just wants to take a more fair share of the Nile. Everybody feels entitled to the Nile. This concept I understand. With that being said I also understand the concept of Egypt being concerned. There country functions though the Nile and its existing. 

I would like to see more of Ethiopia's plans and the statistics they've gathered throughout the duration of this project. I'm sure they have comprised some projected statistics, not just focusing on the positive aspects (for them) but also the negative aspects for Sudan and Egypt. The article states Sudan is on board but Egypt-although taking part in the new agreement thus putting aside the colonial era treaty- is very hesitant when discussing the existence of the dam. Obviously there are fair reasons for the concern...but then again exactly what are the reasons? How would the Nile be affected by the dam and also how would countries downstream (Egypt, Sudan) be affected? 

Its a concern amongst African countries but is it also a concern amongst the world? Will professionals from other countries "put their two cents in?" 

With all this being said, I suppose it does not matter...to Ethiopia. They have already begun the process of building and are about 30% completed. As stated in this bbc article: http://www.bbc.com/news/world-africa-26679225 Another interesting factor is how other sub Saharan countries are in favor of the dam. Why? Being in favor means they probably benefit from the dam as well, however this is something that may come to my light at the dam progresses. Until the dams construction is arrested, the dam is certainly being built. Ethiopia is making ground, excuse me energy, to better its country as a whole.  

Kevin Cournoyer's curator insight, May 6, 7:22 PM

This article discusses the dispute between Egypt and Ethiopia over the construction of a dam that would provide Ethiopia with a larger share of the Nile's water. Egypt is wholly opposed to this dam because it would mean less water for the country, which so desperately needs it. With 95% of the population of Egypt living within 20km of the Nile River, a reduction in the amount of water supplied to these tens of millions could potentially spell slow disaster. At the same time, however, Ethiopia desperately needs water from the Nile in order to provide sustainable energy for its citizens. 

 

The Nile has been a source of life and energy for thousands of years in an oppressively hot, dry place. The ancient Egyptians counted on the Nile to flood every year so that they would have arable land and used the large river to irrigate their farmland. It is almost ironic, therefore, that Egyptians are once again counting on the water of the Nile to help them survive in such a harsh climate. It seems that the Nile is one of those natural geographic features that is pivotal to political, economic, and social wellbeing. It represents the nexus between natural landforms and the political and economic goals of human beings and nations. Dispute over use of the Nile as a natural and life-giving resource is not the first instance of human debate over possession or use of natural geography and it likely won't be the last. 

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Africa, Uncolonized: A Detailed Look at an Alternate Continent

Africa, Uncolonized: A Detailed Look at an Alternate Continent | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
What if the Black Plague had killed off almost all Europeans? Then the Reconquista never happens. Spain and Portugal don't kickstart Europe's colonization of other continents. And this is what Africa might have looked like.

 

Tags: Africa, colonialism, borders, historical, map.


Via Seth Dixon
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Alec Castagno's curator insight, December 17, 2014 10:37 AM

It is fascinating to see how different the political borders of Africa would have been without European colonial influence. One thing this map predicts is that if the Europeans would not have pushed into Africa, Arab and Islamic influences would have filled the void. The huge number of independent states or regions on this map show how large the continent is and how many different ethnic and religious groups there are.

Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, December 17, 2014 5:59 PM

I sometimes do question, what would Africa look like today if it weren't colonized by the Europeans. Before the discovery of Africa, Africa was a land that was dominated by wealthy kingdoms that spent most of its time conquering other countries. With the ideology that Africa was a land flowing with milk and honey inhabited by uncivilized human beings, conquering Africa seemed like the ideal thing for European super powers to do in order to exploit the lands natural resource at no cost. If Africa was not colonized by Europeans, Africans would have more access to their own natural resources, and the instability that most of African countries face today would most likely not be in existence.

Bob Beaven's curator insight, March 26, 2:26 PM

An interesting fact for a geographer/historian to look at is how different events happening in history can affect a map.  This is very fascinating, because Africa or should I say Alkebu-Lan has very strong looking kingdoms without the Influence of Europe.  Another interesting element of the map is how it is not Euro-centric, Africa is shown as the top of the world.  I guess in this history, Northern Europe instead of being a powerhouse of the world, would be classified as the dark region (like the Congo was in our own world).  It is also interesting how the map is not Euro-centric, but the fact to keep in mind there is the old saying, history is written by the winner.  In this case, the map of the world was drawn by the winning Europeans as well, and this map completely reverses that.  Another interesting fact, is that the Iberian is part of an Islamic Empire.  It looks, as if in this history, Portugal was overcome by the "Arabes" and Spain never even attempted to launch the Reconquista.  History and Geography, especially Political Geography are very closely linked with one another.  

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8 Maps That Will Change the Way You Look at Africa

8 Maps That Will Change the Way You Look at Africa | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Expansion of population and investment on the continent represent both enormous opportunity and potential for crises and injustice.

Via Nancy Watson
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Nancy Watson's curator insight, November 9, 2014 1:13 PM

Africa, a geography lesson. It is a continent, not a country.  Larger than many expect and full of diversity.

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The long and ugly tradition of treating Africa as a dirty, diseased place

The long and ugly tradition of treating Africa as a dirty, diseased place | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
How alarmist, racist coverage of Ebola makes things worse. A dressing down of the latest #NewsweekFail.

Via Seth Dixon, LEONARDO WILD
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Danielle Lip's curator insight, March 15, 2:21 PM

Today these are still people who are racist in a way towards people of color, a sentence in this article states "people of color — were inherently less intelligent than northern Europeans with light-colored skin." Thinking that someone is less intelligent because of the skin color is very rude and unintelligent in a way. 

This article is describing how Africa is believed to be dirty, so that is how the Ebola virus was brought to the United States. A group of scientists proved that this is invalid. Ebola is caused by bushmeat and there is no chance of bush meat smuggling could bring Ebola to America. The whole Ebola case goes to show that Africa is still seen as dirty and unsanitary. This article is not focused primarily on Ebola but how the case showed how Africa is viewed in others eyes.

Brian Wilk's curator insight, March 28, 9:12 AM

It's time to change our views on the "Dark Continent" known as Africa. Time to slow down the knee jerk reaction to newsworthy stories emanating from this geographical area. This is overt racism at its core. Africa as we learned in class last week has five of the top ten growing economies in the world. How can we help this continent thrive economically if we have so many preconceived notions of what this place is all about? 

"Bushmeat" is just another acronym that is contextually manipulated to give inaccurate information and to sell print. As the author states, just call it game as most of the free world acknowledges it. Africa is a rich country with multiple heritages albeit with a long history of repression and fractured civilizations. It's time we pay them back with financial support via The World Bank, and start to change our distorted views of this area. It's abundant natural resources are just waiting to be harvested, which when allocated morally correctly will bring this impoverished continent out of the Third World and into sustainability for its peoples.

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, April 9, 2:21 PM

Before I even read the article, my first thought went to the Linneaus classification.  That really damaged history with this one chart.  I think people still think of Africans and blacks(very dark blacks) as dirty or unintelligent.  Which is horrible and couldn't be further from the truth.  Misinforming the public is criminal.  News media and social media need to be careful and educate properly.  I've been asked from a customs offical, "Have you been to Africa in the past 6 months?"  Which is a very blanket question because Africa is a continent.  There were areas that were not hit with Ebola.  

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How Ebola sped out of control

How Ebola sped out of control | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
The story behind the failure of the world's health organizations to stop the Ebola disaster.

Via Seth Dixon
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Bella The Non-Vampire's curator insight, January 12, 10:18 AM

The development between MDCs and LDCs are very different in a lot of ways. The Ebola epidemic is handled in two different ways because of the levels of development in countries. in MDCs there is more of a health indutry and can cure sicknesses much faster than those countries of less development. 

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Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, April 9, 2:29 PM

It was sad that it took over 4 months for there to be declared an epidemic.  I think if this hit in the US or Europe then things would have been taken care of a lot faster.  Out of sight, out of mind till one trickled in then another.  Then we got scared.  But Africa needs to get it together and create a better continent with healthcare systems that work.  The doctors over there said it looked medieval.  I believe that and can't even fathom how horrible it was.  

Molly McComb's curator insight, May 27, 11:11 AM

Talking about the failure of WHO to stop the Ebola outbreak and how the low developed countries were so quickly affected by the disease. 

 

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Do you know Africa?

Do you know Africa? | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

Many of Africa’s leaders will be in town next week attending a White House summit. The continent’s land is shared among 49 countries — many of which rarely make U.S. headlines. How familiar are you with Africa’s geography?


Via Seth Dixon, FCHSAPGEO
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Jason Schneider's curator insight, March 9, 3:41 PM

http://lizardpoint.com/geography/africa-quiz.php

This is easier because it shows you the shape of the countries. As for this quiz, I can locate any African country but some of them, not precisely. I'm able to locate Ethiopia, Libya and Angola obviously because they're bigger but not Togo, Eritrea and Rwanda. However, I can closely locate the smaller countries but not precisely.

Jared Medeiros's curator insight, March 29, 5:21 PM

I love interactive maps like this.  These are the best way to learn where things are in the world geographically.  Africa is the toughest, for myself, continent in the world to be able to locate and identify where certain countries are.  This is in part because Africa has so many countries and also Africa is a part of the world that is not often taught in school, therefore you have limited thoughts and ideas about these types of areas.

David Lizotte's curator insight, April 22, 1:54 PM

I have always been fascinated with Africa and its history. Through its history one can understand why Africa is the way it is today. Its a shame that Africa does not have more of a focus in the Public School Curriculum. Its played a huge part in developing western civilization, whether it be in ancient Alexandria providing grain for the Roman Republic or the coltan extracted through inhumane means in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Africa is a continent that has been raped and torn in a repetitive manor under a variety of foul experiences brought upon by western countries. These are the same western countries that are held of high interest and regards in subject manor instituted in the Public School System. Africa has also been apart of amazing developments of human civilization, for example the Trans Saharan Trade Route which linked Kingdoms such as Ancient Ghana to dynasties far in the Middle East. It is also the birthplace of man (no big deal). In either case there needs to be a stronger push on teaching/molding "Africa" (yes, I know... broad) into the curriculum. It is important in both understanding the history of the world, specifically western civilization and how it coined itself  “civilized.” Through introducing basic aspects, history, and dilemmas (both old and modern) it could inspire more interest and an expansion of knowledge from student to student. School is and will most likely continue to be Euro-centric and have large flares of Americana and other “themes” of North America. 

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Africans Open Fuller Wallets to the Future

Africans Open Fuller Wallets to the Future | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Across sub-Saharan Africa, consumer demand is fueling the continent’s economies in new ways, driving hopes that Africa will emerge as a success story.

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Nancy Watson's curator insight, July 21, 2014 7:31 PM

Core countries "mass consumption" and desire for cheap goods may help pull Africa forward.

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African borders

African borders | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"About the history of the creation of Africa borders and debates about African borders."


Via Seth Dixon, Aki Puustinen, Dean J. Fusto, Suvi Salo
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MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 7:50 PM

APHG-U4

David Lizotte's curator insight, April 14, 9:45 PM

In all honesty, the history of Africa intrigues me. I've always tried to expand my knowledge on the subject as well as stay current with its modern affairs (as best as possible). I have had the pleasure of studying abroad in South Africa for a semester as well as taking courses focusing on the vast continent throughout my career as a RIC student. 

Ancient Africa is a topic I know more about than the average person. It's slavery and the effects it had on the realm, followed by Colonialism/Post Colonialism that I like to take pride in knowing best. I've taken different courses focusing on the matter and have done my fair share of research for pleasure. However, I still have a lot more research to do because I have so many thoughts, questions, and comments  (before making a comment on a particular subject I like to research it in depth) to make. 

I have the desire to pursue an education focusing on "Africa" and its colonial aspects. I feel like I would pursue a solid topic of high interest-perhaps even importance- to me and research the dickens out of it. I would prefer it to be an original piece though. Not a blunt history of colonial rule in Africa, whether it be specific or broad. I do not want to reiterate what others have already side. I want to create my own theories on Africa. 

Currently I am quite interested in "Post-Colonial" Africa and the fact that I find this term to be exotic, foreign, and even a facade. There are colonial aspects of Africa that have existed for decades and will continue to do so as long as Western and Eastern (China) "business" is "functioning." "Business" is broad yet it is being used here to describe the basic global economy, producers and consumers thus a subsequent supply and demand. Now, what does the term "functioning" mean? Well, to simply put it, business functions through Africa's exponential amount of natural resources, cheap labor, and corrupt officials. Most of the civilized world benefits from Africa's numerable resources yet the vast majority of African's themselves do not enjoy such pleasures. This is a trend that has existed since the Portuguese appraised the Western Coast of the continent in the early fifteenth century. 

I understand that this basic premise may not be the first of its kind, in general. However, there are specific situations/conflicts that can be researched further towards developing a more unique body of work. If I do pursue a higher education in this area I plan on succeeding in producing a sound body of work that I am proud to put my name on. It would be neat to teach the significance of the three maps displayed in this scoop.it article. 

Emily Coats's curator insight, May 27, 10:20 AM

UNIT 4 POLITICAL 

This article shows many maps depicting the history and creation of African borders, as well as the impact of colonialism on Africa. This shows where different groups resided, and how borders were not properly made to fit one single nation, but mixed together many nations in one region.These maps are extremely useful when trying to learn more about Africa and its history, specifically its boundaries. 

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China Turns To Africa For Resources, Jobs And Future Customers

China Turns To Africa For Resources, Jobs And Future Customers | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
In China's Second Continent, Howard French explores the Chinese presence in 15 African countries. The relationship goes beyond economics: more than a million Chinese citizens have migrated to Africa.

 

He says there's a debate about the long-term consequences of China's push into the African continent: Will it create development and prosperity, or will it lead to exploitation reminiscent of 19th-century European colonialism?

 

Tags: Africa, development, China, industry, economic, podcast.


Via Seth Dixon
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Edelin Espino's curator insight, December 5, 2014 10:40 AM

Is good that China decided to make business outside of its territories. With this plan, they are helping they own economic, but also improving other people lives with the airport and highway.

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 12, 2014 4:05 PM

Though the age of European Imperialism has long since ended, China is beginning to realize the benefits involved with economic expansion into other countries. "More than a million Chinese citizens have permanently moved to Africa, buying land, starting businesses and settling among local populations." Many are worried that this push into Africa could lead to extreme exploitation and disparity among native Africans while China solely benefits. If you compare this scenario with what is occurring in Myanmar and other parts of Southeast Asia, it would seem that China is there specifically for its own benefit. 

David Lizotte's curator insight, April 5, 1:47 PM

Only the Chinese would see a potential market in Africa...

However, in all seriousness I too see the potential market. The continent is huge. The population is ridiculous and it is only going to keep growing. A population of this magnitude needs goods to live. In turn, China will provide for this demand. However it is blatant that the market (African people) will be exploited at whatever cost. The manufacturing, selling, etc. is being done, according to this article, by Chinese people. These people left China in search of money and perhaps even a place to settle down. China is expanding to Africa so a lot of Chinese people are going to move to Africa for employment. China wins by increasing its economic output and losing its dead weight. By dead weight I mean the chinese citizens whom stem from lower middle class. These people were struggling in China. China could not produce jobs for them. These people then follow the money to Africa and once there "job" is done decide to stay and live in Africa. As stated by the article this is an independent decision being made. I understand that and I recognize it as not being an immediate concern.

What concerns me is the exploitation of natural resources as well as the exploitation of the African market. China will produce goods that they know will be sold in Africa- they will design everything to meet Africa's wants and needs, thus taking there money. An African business will not benefit from this commerce rather a Chinese firm, with Chinese workers. One can argue its business and I suppose it truly  is. China see's a continent that they can invest in. There country will benefit from it as well as its people, whom are finding jobs abroad and continue to work abroad due to the affluent economy. The Chinese see African people as "demand" and they want to "supply" for that never ending demand. 

The article mentions/compares this situation to colonialism. It certainly does seem like a form of exploitation in which the foreign investors make money off of the African people and the regions resources however it is being done in a business like fashion. This could be seen as the more modern form of colonialism. It's not a direct rule over a territory and people rather its a business venture. But couldn't the business venture be seen as a front? 

What's interesting is how China is very much taking a hands off approach in the local politics. They aren't getting immersed in the government rather they see themselves as business people operating in another country...for China's benefit. They aren't there to provide goods for the African people out of the goodness of there heart rather they just want to sell the goods that they know will sell to the massive population. China is setting up shop in a non-democratic way, in which they don't care about the society rather they just care about the financial benefit. The political standing of the country does not bother China. Also, this could be seen as China thinking long term. Instead of thinking democratically and "more fair like" China can focus more on its own business and people and not have to worry about crisis in the country as a whole. 

More than a million Chinese have emigrated to the continent of Africa to start business'. More Chinese will travel to Africa...chain migration... they will develop and make money off of the African market. Chinese will elevate there status in Africa off of the backs of natural resources (in Africa) as well as make money from the African market. A market that will be exploited-whether good or bad- exploited non the less. 

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Business Languages In Africa

Business Languages In Africa | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"The Main Languages of Business in Africa."


Via Seth Dixon, Nancy Watson, Malmci@Spatialzone
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Alec Castagno's curator insight, December 17, 2014 11:38 AM

The continued influence of colonization can be seen when this map is compared with maps of colonial Africa. The dominant business language match up almost exactly with the country that used to dominate the area. The fact that these languages are used for business shows how the deep impacts the European settlers had across the continent. Even the northern portion of the continent shows the strong influence and ties the region has with the Arabic world. 

Jason Schneider's curator insight, March 9, 3:48 PM

The English language seems to be spread out mostly throughout central and southern Africa. But I never though of the language of french being taken up by 30% of Africa. When I look at this map, I try to think about how close these languages are to their respective countries. For instance, I would imagine Arabic being closer to the eastern part of Africa since the middle east is closer to Eritrea, Djibouti and Somalia. Also, I would think that the french and spanish languages would be closer to the northern part of Africa since France and Spain are north of Africa.

Kevin Cournoyer's curator insight, May 6, 10:46 PM

This map is a simple but powerful one. Africa is the continent that contains the most nations (53), yet it uses only six languages for business. Not surprisingly, all of the languages (with the exception of Arabic) are European in origin. Clearly, the effects of colonialism are still felt around the world in former colonies. The languages that were forced upon various African countries by their colonizers have endured and become the main languages of business in their respective countries. What is just as unfortunate as the roots of colonialism holding fast, if not more so, is the absence of any indigenous languages being used as the language of business in any of the countries of Africa. While using a business language that is spoken by much of the world is surely a matter of practicality and logistics, it is still robbing African countries of their heritage and culture to some degree.

 

This brings up the issue of globalization and how it is constantly at odds with the preservation of culture and tradition. In order for Africa (or any continent or region or country) to function in the modern world, it must be capable of conducting business in a language that is spoken by its business partners. The ability to do business with virtually any person, company, or country in the world is an obviously invaluable one. At the same time, however, it allows for the subtle and gradual erasure of unique culture and traditions. So while it would be ideal for cultural preservation for countries to conduct business in their indigenous languages, it seems to be a necessary evil for smaller and less influential countries to adopt the languages of their more powerful and influential business partners if they wish to survive in today's world. 

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A short, recent history of Congo

Mapping the war in Congo: mineral wealth, militias and an epic march

Via Seth Dixon, Michael Miller
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Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 5, 2014 3:04 PM

A very comprehensive coverage of the past 20 years. I did not realize just how much Rwanda influenced the major problems in the Congo. Having the capital city of Kinshasa so geographically far away from its "trouble border" is probably making it more difficult to control.

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, March 31, 4:10 PM

This video is tough to follow at times due to the amount of information that is given in less than five minutes, but it gives a brief and thorough account of the dynamics that have taken place in the Rwanda/Congo region.  This genocide is a very popular one in historical scholarship but I have not had an opportunity to spend any time researching it.  This video definitely provided me with a strong understanding of what happened.  It also shows how countries can support certain individuals or entities that, many times, ends up backfiring on them.

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, April 9, 2:39 PM

This is another sad story.  There is fast wealth in this area.  More than enough to get this economy off the ground and be a booming source of wealth for the countries.  Ever since the British, Belgiums, and foreigners created conflict in the area there has been so much unrest. They need to get out of their own ways and elect someone who won't steal millions.  They could get back to the golden days, but not until they have some peace which would then lead to prosperity.  

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Mexico: African Migrants

United Nations, New York, May 2012 - Mexico has long been a haven for poor migrants from Latin America. But this is a story about an unexpected group of peop...

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Egypt, Ethiopia and Sudan sign deal to end Nile dispute

Egypt, Ethiopia and Sudan sign deal to end Nile dispute | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Three African leaders sign an initial deal to end a long-running dispute over the sharing of Nile waters and the building of Africa's biggest hydroelectric dam.

Via Seth Dixon, David Lizotte, Luke Gray
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Lena Minassian's curator insight, April 8, 12:45 PM

This was an interesting read because I was not too familiar with this dispute. Three leaders have officially signed a deal to end a long dispute over sharing the Nile waters and beginning to build Africa's largest hydroelectric dam in Ethiopia. The three leaders are from Sudan, Ethiopia, and Egypt and signed the agreement in Sudan's capital city. Many feared that previous Dam's would worsen the water supply but this new Dam will give a more fairer share for everyone. These leaders assured that this new Dam will not cause any harm to the downstream countries but this project is still a ooncern for Egypt. The nile is the only source of water for some. Ethiopia has stated the the river will be diverted a little but will still follow it's natural course. Ethiopia is being backed up by many other countries as well.

David Lizotte's curator insight, April 10, 3:29 PM

The key of this article is that there has been an initial treaty signed. This agreement overturns a colonial era treaty which stated any countries upstream (south of Egypt) essentially had no right to touch the Nile in any way that would effect Egypt. They had veto power over everything. 

The reason behind this is that Ethiopia had overthrown there colonial power-Italy, in the 1890's-and was henceforth its own country. Another attempt to seize Ethiopia took place in the 1930's under Benito Mussolini's rule. Him being a fascist and wanting to be like Hitler and take everything certainly contributed to Mussolini wanting to take Ethiopia. Another contributing factor is the fact that Italy tried and failed in claiming/colonizing Ethiopia. They had lost in the battle field. Mussolini wanted to improve and prove Eastern Italian Africa's dominance. Ethiopia would be freed of Italy's rule during WWII and become its own country once again. In any case the article states the treaty designed by the British was set forth in 1929. Ethiopia was not part of British Africa, or a protectorate (in regards to what Egypt would become in relation to the UK), so Britain would not care about the Nile in Ethiopia, rather the Nile in Sudan and especially in Egypt. Any country upstream is to not obstruct or deter the natural flow of the Nile-a pivotal source for Egyptian civilization. 90 percent of Egyptians live within 20km of the Nile while a little over 50 percent live within 1km. It is clear Egypt needs the Nile in order to function.

Ethiopia is able to create jobs through the building of the dam and will also be able to employ people through dam maintenance, inspections, etc... for years to come (if the dam is built). The dam will also provide an immense amount of power/energy, truly benefiting the country. The article states Ethiopia just wants to take a more fair share of the Nile. Everybody feels entitled to the Nile. This concept I understand. With that being said I also understand the concept of Egypt being concerned. There country functions though the Nile and its existing. 

I would like to see more of Ethiopia's plans and the statistics they've gathered throughout the duration of this project. I'm sure they have comprised some projected statistics, not just focusing on the positive aspects (for them) but also the negative aspects for Sudan and Egypt. The article states Sudan is on board but Egypt-although taking part in the new agreement thus putting aside the colonial era treaty- is very hesitant when discussing the existence of the dam. Obviously there are fair reasons for the concern...but then again exactly what are the reasons? How would the Nile be affected by the dam and also how would countries downstream (Egypt, Sudan) be affected? 

Its a concern amongst African countries but is it also a concern amongst the world? Will professionals from other countries "put their two cents in?" 

With all this being said, I suppose it does not matter...to Ethiopia. They have already begun the process of building and are about 30% completed. As stated in this bbc article: http://www.bbc.com/news/world-africa-26679225 Another interesting factor is how other sub Saharan countries are in favor of the dam. Why? Being in favor means they probably benefit from the dam as well, however this is something that may come to my light at the dam progresses. Until the dams construction is arrested, the dam is certainly being built. Ethiopia is making ground, excuse me energy, to better its country as a whole.  

Kevin Cournoyer's curator insight, May 6, 7:22 PM

This article discusses the dispute between Egypt and Ethiopia over the construction of a dam that would provide Ethiopia with a larger share of the Nile's water. Egypt is wholly opposed to this dam because it would mean less water for the country, which so desperately needs it. With 95% of the population of Egypt living within 20km of the Nile River, a reduction in the amount of water supplied to these tens of millions could potentially spell slow disaster. At the same time, however, Ethiopia desperately needs water from the Nile in order to provide sustainable energy for its citizens. 

 

The Nile has been a source of life and energy for thousands of years in an oppressively hot, dry place. The ancient Egyptians counted on the Nile to flood every year so that they would have arable land and used the large river to irrigate their farmland. It is almost ironic, therefore, that Egyptians are once again counting on the water of the Nile to help them survive in such a harsh climate. It seems that the Nile is one of those natural geographic features that is pivotal to political, economic, and social wellbeing. It represents the nexus between natural landforms and the political and economic goals of human beings and nations. Dispute over use of the Nile as a natural and life-giving resource is not the first instance of human debate over possession or use of natural geography and it likely won't be the last. 

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These Amazing Maps Show the True Diversity of Africa

These Amazing Maps Show the True Diversity of Africa | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"African countries are also quite diverse from an ethnic standpoint. As the Washington Post's Max Fisher noted back in 2013, the world's 20 most ethnically diverse countries are all African, partially because European colonial powers divvied up sections of the continent with little regard for how the residents would have organized the land themselves. This map above shows Africa's ethnographic regions as identified by George Murdock in his 1959 ethnography of the continent."

 

Tags: Africa, colonialism, borders, political, language, ethnicity.


Via Seth Dixon
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Raychel Johnson's curator insight, May 25, 2:42 PM

Summary: This articles purpose is to show how diverse Africa is, and it does so with three maps. The first shows the language diversity, where the top 50 languages are spoken, as well as sub categories for these languages. The next shows the ethnic diversity of Africa, mostly due to the European colonialism dividing the continent, mixed with the already in place African ethnic diversity. The third map was based off of population, showing that it was mostly based around water sources. 

 

Insight: The second map, which focused on the ethnic diversity of Africa, and this is a great example that shows ethnicity compared to continent and country divides. This really shows the division of culture, partnered with language, and how it affects how society functions together and apart. 

Cody Price's curator insight, May 26, 11:31 PM

This article talks about the borders of Africa and how most were made from the colonization of Africa by European countries. But in reality this map shows each ethnic group and how it should be divided by groups and beliefs. In reality colonization hurt the continent of Africa and has created conflict for years.  

 

This article relates to the topic in unit 4 of  colonization. Colonization is when a more powerful country comes ion a takes over and runs a less developed country claiming it for itself to use it for resources and to govern it.      

Shane C Cook's curator insight, May 27, 8:54 AM

Africa is a very diverse and complicated continent due o mistakes made in the Berlin Conference. The strange boundaries drawn restrict these African nations to be one with their own people not with their enemies.

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How was the AIDS epidemic reversed?

How was the AIDS epidemic reversed? | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"If ever there was a demonstration of the power of science, it is the course of the fight billed 'Mankind v AIDS'. Until 1981 the disease (though already established in parts of Africa) was unknown to science. Within a decade it passed from being seen as primarily a threat to gay men, and then to promiscuous heterosexuals, to being a plague that might do to some parts of Africa what the Black Death did to medieval Europe. But now, though 1.6m people a year still die of it, that number is on a downward trajectory­, and AIDS rarely makes the headlines any more. How was this achieved?  The answer has two parts: sound science and international co-operation."


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Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, December 18, 2014 10:16 AM

Western broadcasting television has done a great job at Demonizing the African Continent. Not only do they portray the Continent as one country sharing the same cultural experience, they have also done a great job as portraying the continent as one that is ridding with diseases, and poverty. One thing they often neglect to do is highlight the great strides African countries are making to combat these diseases. The country would be able to conquer more infectious diseases such as malaria and cholera if they had the proper medical equipment to do so. 

Lora Tortolani's curator insight, March 18, 9:27 PM

I think it's a tremendous gift we have, the gift of resource and money.  This disease proves that with the right amount of money and power, anything is possible.  30 years ago people were deathly afraid of the AIDS virus, thanks to technology and amazing science we seem to be a little more confident in our health system to beat it, or at least be able to live with it. 

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, April 8, 10:09 AM

Its taken very dedicated advocates, scientists, doctors, and nurses to turn the AIDs epidemic around.  When the AIDs epidemic emerged there was a lot of speculation about how you could contract the disease.  Again through science people became educated.  This is a monumental fete that the AIDs virus is on a downward trajectory.  Thank goodness for advances in science and international co-operation.  

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Too rich for its own good

Too rich for its own good | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
The Democratic Republic of Congo is potentially one of the richest countries on earth, but colonialism, slavery and corruption have turned it into one of the poorest

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Bob Beaven's curator insight, March 26, 3:16 PM

It is sad that the Congo is in the current state it is in, the country is very rich in material resources but remains strikingly poor.  The country has been subjugated by poor treatment from the powers of Europe for centuries.  The Portuguese, English, and Belgians all destroyed the country over the years.  The Portuguese were the first to do so, as they wanted the man power to work in the new world, and this also helped the English who had their own new world colonies, the two European groups worked well with each other to plunder the country, which was once a thriving kingdom of manpower.  Things really started going bad for the Congo once the Belgians stepped in and made it their own colony during the African Land Grab.  As the article explains, all its goods were used by the West for years to come (for bullets in WWI, for components of the Atom Bomb in WWII, and even for Cell Phone Components).  Even once the Belgians left, the country was no better off, due to the fact that the indigenous people did not know how to run their own country, how could they after years of domination.  So what happened logically, is that a strong man took over and ran the country as a dictatorship.  Even today, the country remains unstable because after he was thrown out of power the country destabilized and fought Civil Wars in which its neighbors would pick sides.  This article shows that resources can be a dangerous thing for countries to have, outsiders will invade and destabilize them in order to advance their own agendas.  Europe has certainly left a great deal of scars across Africa.

 

Jared Medeiros's curator insight, March 29, 5:02 PM

It is a shame and extremely sad that the people of the Congo can not capitalize on their natural resources to make better lives for themselves.  This country has been ravaged and taken advantage of by outsiders for hundreds of years.  During this time these countries have gotten rich while these people live in poverty.  

Jacob Conklin's curator insight, May 6, 1:04 PM

Geography talks a lot about the impact of globalization and imperialism. One of the best examples of this is found in The Democratic Republic of Congo. For its entire history, imperialist nations have sought out this country's resources and were not hesitant to exploit the population to accomplish this end. On of the great ironies in globalization is that the countries richest in resources are the most exploited. Take to the extreme as in Congo, the economy is so crushed that there is no way for the country to recover. 

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Let’s Talk About Geography and Ebola

Let’s Talk About Geography and Ebola | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Why knowing where countries are in Africa matters for how the rest of the world thinks about Ebola.

 

Cultural and media norms that often refer to Africa as one entity rather than an 11.7 million-square-mile land mass comprised of 54 countries and over 1.1 billion people who speak over 2,000 different languages.  This cultural confusion means that, when a dangerous virus like Ebola breaks out, Americans who are used to referring to “Africa” as one entity may make mistakes in understanding just how big of a threat Ebola actually is, who might have been exposed to it, and what the likelihood of an individual contracting it might be.  This Ebola outbreak is wreaking havoc on African economies beyond the three most heavily affected by Ebola, and that damage is completely avoidable. The East and Southern African safari industry provides a good example. Bookings for safaris there — including for the famed Great Migration in Kenya and Tanzania — have plummeted due to the Ebola outbreak. These actions are based in fear, not reality.

 

Tags: Ebola, medical, diffusion, Africa, regions, perspective.


Via Seth Dixon, Bonnie Bracey Sutton
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Giselle Figueroa's curator insight, November 4, 2014 4:24 PM

I completely agree with this article. Most of people see Africa as one entity, which is not true. I include myself in that group of people because I used to think the same thing. After analyzing this issue in one of my class, I could realized that is not true. There is a lot of people who think that especially when the Ebola issue.

Lora Tortolani's curator insight, March 18, 9:36 PM

It doesn't surprise me that the average person doesn't know his geography.  It shocks the hell out of me that a college would put themselves in a situation to look that stupid!  Do your research people.

Jared Medeiros's curator insight, March 29, 5:08 PM

This is another example of stereotyping taking its course through Africa.  Even though I am aware of the size and diversity of Africa, I was guilty of associating Ebola with the whole continent and not just the affected areas.  Same thing goes with the AIDS virus and other things, such as poverty.  Articles are great for people in other parts of the world to read to better educate them on the size and diversity of Africa and that there are many different ways of life in its 54 countries.

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Why this Ebola outbreak became the worst we've ever seen

"The 2014 Ebola outbreak in West Africa has killed more people than sum total of all the previous outbreaks since the virus was first identified in 1976. This video explains how it got so bad."  


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Brittany Ortiz's curator insight, October 6, 2014 3:08 PM

It is very sad watching knowing how it took to so long to get Ebola out to the public and make it known of the very spreadable virus. It’s obvious how since the US can be at risk of getting the virus in our country they now want to make it very known and for people to be cautious of the idea that Ebola can eventually be in the US and spread. We should have been cautious of the virus many years ago, but the rate of the virus spreading, sky rocketed just this year. It’s obvious why it took so many years for the Ebola virus to be known, since it was just known for it to have been in a particular Sierra Leon and Liberia. Since it has spread from there to the border of Guinea and now potentially going to different parts of the world there is no question why there is a health scare in many countries.

John Nieuwendyk's curator insight, October 28, 2014 10:20 PM

In just a few months the Ebola virus has cumulated out of control. More people became affected and died in the last five months than all of the combined deaths that have occurred since Ebola was first discovered in 1976. Ebola began to spread from rural areas to a border region in West Africa when ill people traveled to the city to work or go to the market, making international spread likely. Mounting a campaign to increase awareness of the risks and to contain the virus was nearly impossible due to the low illiteracy rates. Consequently, health workers were taking ill people away from family and their homes to contaminate centers. This caused much fear and mistrust and was not successful. More people became infected and the snowball effect ensued. When people did show up at ill-equipped hospitals, there were not enough beds or free space and most were turned away. Some health workers walked off the job fearing being infected because of the poor conditions. No gloves, masks or gowns were provided and workers feared for their own health. The ill patients went back into the community and Ebola continued to spread. The response of the global community was not fast enough, and help did not arrive in time before the spread of Ebola became an epidemic. It is clear that in a world that is so closely connected, we must have a global heath system that works.  

Giselle Figueroa's curator insight, November 4, 2014 5:32 PM

Ebola is getting worst every day. one of the things that has caused the spread of this virus is the fact that many working people cross the border to other regions to work or to go to market. Back in days, you used to see this Ebola issue in very rural areas, but now is getting worst. In these areas were the Ebola is getting worst, they do not count with a good health system. Sometimes there are day when they do not have gloves, gowns and mask, and because of that, there have been health care workers who have just walked away from their jobs because they do not want to put in risk their life. This  is a very sad situation, which I hope it get better.

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First taste of chocolate

"To be honest I do not know what they make of my beans," says farmer N'Da Alphonse. "I've heard they're used as flavoring in cooking, but I've never seen it. I do not even know if it's true." Watch how the Dutch respond to a cocoa bean in return or you can watch our entire episode on chocolate here.


Via Seth Dixon
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Kendra King's curator insight, March 15, 6:30 PM

This is a reminder of how well off the past colonizers really are in comparison to the once colonized lands. When describing the chocolate some of the African workers called it “a precious gift” and a “privilege to taste.” Yet even I, a huge chocoholic, think both of those descriptions are extreme. My reaction to this stems solely from that fact that I am lucky enough to have what I think is a simple commodity in the United States. Really, the descriptions from the farmers probably isn’t that far off since they never ate it before. Hearing their reactions though was just a bit it is actually a bit sad. They handle a part of the produce every day, but never knew what it was like. Now that the farmers know it is going to be bitter sweet as well. On the one hand, they had the pleasure of knowing. However, they probably won’t have an opportunity to eat the chocolate ever again give how expensive and rare it is in their country. I wonder of many years from now, the Ivory Coast will ever be able to raise the standard of living within the country enough so that chocolate will one day be seen as common place? 

Brian Wilk's curator insight, March 28, 9:24 AM

It is inconceivable that these farmers did not know what the end product was. A little suspicious of the lack of knowledge given the relative ease of access to the internet. the point is still valid as the real factor here is the inputs of labor being so inexpensive. In class last week, we learned that Africa is by far the youngest continent in the world and thus is ripe for exploitation of young and plentiful labor. Seems Africa can't win when it comes to slavery; from the exportation of slaves to the Americas and Europe in the late 1700's to mid 1800's to colonization efforts by Britain and other nations they can't catch a break. I love my chocolate and will not stop purchasing it. That is not the issue. The issue is slave labor and corrupt governments that support this problem. The Ivory Coast is aptly named; white supremacy at it's core....

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 21, 4:06 PM

unit 6 key concepts development, poverty, globalization, industry, labor

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The World's Biggest Cities Will Be in Asia and Africa by 2030

The World's Biggest Cities Will Be in Asia and Africa by 2030 | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
New York, Osaka, and Sao Paulo won't even make the top 10.

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Nancy Watson's curator insight, July 11, 2014 1:15 PM

Good article for the Urban Unit. Mega cities of the world are growing in Asia and Africa as some MDC are seeing a decline in population and more slowly growing cities.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, July 16, 2014 9:53 AM

units 2 and 7!

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Ten Days in Kenya With No Cash, Only a Phone - Businessweek

Ten Days in Kenya With No Cash, Only a Phone - Businessweek | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

It’s often the first thing a visitor to a foreign country hears, an offer of services before he’s found his feet. It always feels like an invitation to get ripped off, and it frequently is. There’s almost no helping it.


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Will Ethiopian dam dry up the Nile?

Will Ethiopian dam dry up the Nile? | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"Construction of the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam (known as Gerd) is now about 30% complete.  Once completed, in three years, it will be Africa's largest hydropower dam, standing some 170m (558ft) tall."


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Albert Jordan's curator insight, April 1, 2014 3:06 PM

In an area fraught with political instability, non state actors, and rebel groups all too willing to fight for power and the wealth that comes from it - it will be interesting to see how the conflicts shift over time as this dam gets closer to completion. Will Egypt attempt to sabotage it or will they take a more diplomatic approach and try to work with the Ethiopian government diplomatically again?  Perhaps Egypt will whisper in to the ear of Sudan or the various "rebel" groups in the region, considering diplomatic means have apparently failed so far. With Sudan's use of the Blue River also going to be affected by Ethiopia's damming, it will be interesting to see if a cooperation between Egypt and Sudan occurs. Perhaps Ethiopia would like to see a deeper conflict between Sudan and South Sudan, keeping their affected neighbor off balance.

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, April 16, 2014 6:47 PM

It is extremely difficult to divide a river. The Ethiopians will benefit immensely from this project but the Egyptians could lose everything if the Nile dries up. This is going to be a difficult problem to solve.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 3:45 PM

There is no way the whole Nile river is going to be dried up because of this damn. Ethiopia won't let that happen. To say that the river is going to have the same amount of water in it, thats not going to happen. Obviously the Gerd is going to have a huge impact on the water supply of the Nile but it definitely isn't going to dry up the whole thing!

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Oil Pirates and the Mystery Ship

Oil Pirates and the Mystery Ship | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"Forget Somalia, the world's new epicenter of piracy is on the other side of Africa."

 

Some experts believe that the uptick in the number and geographical reach of pirate attacks is due in part precisely to the 2009 government amnesty for the Nigerian militants in the Niger Delta who had justified their attacks on oil infrastructure and their widespread theft of crude oil as a political protest. "With the political pretense lost, there is no longer any need for oil thieves to limit themselves to targets in the Delta," a United Nations study said.


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Shiva Prakash's curator insight, February 3, 2014 11:20 PM

Technology is changing the shopping habits of buyers. Compete recently conducted a survey that reported a rapid increase in the number of people using their mobile devices for shopping Online shopping which u can buy from home easily with lots of designs of cloths and new technology mobile phones without going out for shopping just click here to go eaZy http://shopdeer.blogspot.in/

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, March 19, 2014 10:08 AM

This article points to the little known problem of piracy off the western coast of Africa.  When one thinks of African piracy, one thinks of the Somali pirates it is important to know that piracy is not just limited to eastern Africa.

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South Sudan factional fighting leaves hundreds feared dead

South Sudan factional fighting leaves hundreds feared dead | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"Two days of street battles between rival factions in South Sudan's army left parts of the capital in ruins and prompted fears of a bloodbath in the world's youngest country.

UN officials in New York said they had received reports from local sources indicating that between 400 and 500 people had been killed and up to 800 wounded. More than 16,000 people were seeking refuge at UN facilities. What began on Sunday night as an alleged coup attempt now threatens to widen deep ethnic divisions in a country awash with weapons and still recovering from a devastating war that led to its secession from the north in 2011."


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Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, March 24, 2014 9:51 PM

The newest nation in the world still faces hardships today in 2014. In 2013 the country was almost involved with a civil war between the government and rebel forces. One of the reasons for violence occurring was some people who were supportive of the vice president felt the president was acting like a dictator. However, in 2014 a cease-fire was signed between the government and rebel forces, but violence still occurs between those groups of people and over natural resources such as oil.

It is very difficult for the newest country in the world to be successful, as it is politically unstable. 

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 4, 2014 2:37 PM

Wow they just got their own country and now they are fighting amongst themselves. The government said it was a misunderstanding. Sad that 500 people died due to a misunderstanding.

Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, November 1, 2014 10:59 PM

Two and a half years as a country and they are already fighting?  With all the instability already in Sudan before South Sudan was created it doesn't help that there are differences between the people of South Sudan to add to the mix.  The people don't even trust their own government as they are flocking in masses to the UN refugee centers instead of listening to the government when they have been assured security.  With any hope South Sudan can get it together, stop killing their own people, and become an example for other countries around them to follow.